BASEBALL'S WEEK

August 12, 1962

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Vic Power of Minnesota came out to hit in a dirty uniform and Plate Umpire Sam Carragan made him go back and slip into something fresher. Returning cleanly attired five minutes later, Power got a bunt single. Pitcher Dave Stenhouse also learned a lesson about sanitation—that if you must be unclean, at least be tight-lipped about it. At the All-Star Game, in the spirit of temporary camaraderie, Washington's Stenhouse had told Manager Ralph Houk that he used pine tar, a sort of sticky spit, on his hands. Two days later, Stenhouse was facing Houk's regular team, and right away the Yankee manager squealed to the umps, who promptly made Stenhouse go wash his hands. New York drew the biggest professional sports crowd ever to assemble in the District of Columbia, and so many kids took to running onto the field that the Senators almost lost by forfeit. Then they lost anyway. Earlier in the week, in Yankee Stadium, Roger Maris had thrown a golf ball back into the friendly right-field stands whence it had come. Such a lack of golfing etiquette may be excused, however, because, unlike Arnold Palmer's, Maris' army is against him. Mickey Mantle's knee acted up again, but Hector Lopez continued to pick up the slack (.429), providing Houk with the ahh-gee-whiz problem of having Tony Kubek back from the Army with no place to play him. Mel McGaha of Cleveland should have such worries. With five more losses, his team was down to .500 after a 6-19 swoon since that day a mere month ago when it led the league. Dick Donovan picked up two of the three Indian wins, and somebody else broke into the clubhouse and picked up a bunch of gloves, three of them Shortstop Woodie Held's. The cops are out looking for a budding infielder. Baltimore sleuths were faced with the tougher job of tracking down a virus that felled a few of the players and, worse yet, the team trainer too. A healthy .458 week by Brooks Robinson was about all that kept Ben Casey off the Oriole payroll. Los Angeles (4-4) dropped to third as Ken McBride lost his bid for his 11th straight. Forty-year-old Art Fowler won one and helped save three others in relief. For Chicago Juan Pizarro split a doubleheader all by himself with the Yanks. You never knew how Detroit would go, either. The Tigers won one game with three runs in the ninth after two were out and nobody on. They lost another when a sure double hit an umpire and turned into an out. Kansas City—its injury total at 68 for the year now—split six with better pitching. But in one double-header the staff gave up almost half a mile in walks, hits and subsequent further movement around the bases. And then there's Boston. Eighth place or not, the Red Sox certainly have had their moments. After 28 starts by the pitching staff without a complete game, Bill Monbouquette no-hit the White Sox, giving but a lone walk, thus adequately satisfying Manager Mike Higgins' humble pre-game wish: "I hope he can finish what he starts."

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Though they may well be "the worst team ever to play baseball," the Mets (see page 22) won a doubleheader. A twin bill. The Mets. Won. Of course, they had to do it in their own fashion, which was to take 23 innings and more than seven hours, but then, all week New York did things its own special way. In the three games before The Doubleheader the team scored 19 runs—15 in a row on homers—and lost them all. Completely wasted was Frank Thomas' record-tying two HRs in each of three straight games. The team that lost to the Mets was nobody but the NL champions from Cincinnati, who look only like champion homebodies this year. At Crosley Field the Reds are 40-15; everywhere else 23-30. Things were hardly better with second-place San Francisco. A 2-3 week dropped the Giants five games back, and when lowly Chicago beat them, a sarcastic local headline read: "Giants Nearly Beat Cubs." Chicago was paced by the .409 hitting of Billy Williams and by the continued spotless fielding of Ken Hubbs, who has now gone 47 games without an error. Eleven more and he breaks Red Schoendienst's NL record for second basemen. With a 2-3 week Pittsburgh hardly ended its collapse. The majors' leading hitter, Smokey Burgess, led the losing way with .476 and two HRs, receiving some help from subs Howie Goss (.333, 4 RBIs) and Jim Marshall (5 for 8) when they got a chance. Milwaukee cooled off to 3-3, and, unbelievably, Warren Spahn came down with the first sore arm of his career. Houston was an improved 3-3, and still changing its roster. Among the latest additions is a young outfielder named Ron Davis, who is valued so highly by the Colts that they had put a minor league franchise in Durham, N.C.—where he was attending Duke—just to accommodate him. There hasn't been an NL no-hitter in St. Louis since 1924, and Ray Washburn lost his try for one in the seventh inning. Still, he held on for a four-hit shutout, his second win of the week, as Minnie Minoso came back to the starting lineup and the Cards posted a 4-2 mark. Philadelphia was 3-2 in the National League, but 0-1 against Class A opposition. Their Williamsport farm beat them 5-1. Not only that, but pitching ace Art Mahaffey was bombed in his All-Star appearance. On his next regular turn he came back to win his 15th and hit a grand slam home run. Los Angeles kept rolling, doing various interesting things in the process. Don Drysdale won his 20th, and Maury Wills stole his 54th—stealing home for the first time in his major league career. They gave Leo Durocher a rubber mat so he wouldn't erase the chalk third-base coaching lines, as is his custom, and the fans were queuing up for seats way out in right field just to be near darling Frank Howard. Johnny Podres, attired in Sandy Koufax' sweatshirt, won his fourth straight game, and vowed the injured Koufax would not get his sweatshirt back. The way the rest of the Dodgers were going, a sweatshirt was all of Sandy Koufax that they needed.

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TWO PHOTOSCHICAGO'S WEEK saw Cubs' George Altman beat Giants with a home run and Sox' Charley Maxwell hit three more homers on Sunday.

PITCHING—BEST & WORST

Most Wins

Pct. Club Wins

Most Losses

Pct. Club Losses

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NY

Terry

15

23%

Terry

9

23%

Minn

Pascual

15

25%

Kaat

9

19%

LA

McBride

11

18%

Duren

8

17%

Balt

Pappas

10

18%

Estrada

12

23%

Clev

Donovan

15

28%

Perry

9

17%

Chi

2 with

10

19%

Pizarro

11

20%

Det

Bunning

11

22%

Mossi

11

20%

Bos

2 with

9

19%

Schwall

11

19%

KC

4 with

8

17%

Rakow

12

19%

Wash

Stenhouse

10

24%

Daniels

12

19%

NATIONAL LEAGUE

LA

Drysdale

20

27%

2 with

7

19%

SF

Sanford

14

20%

O'Dell

10

24%

Cin

2 with

16

25%

O'Toole

11

24%

Pitt

Friend

12

19%

Friend

10

22%

StL

Gibson

13

21%

Jackson

9

18%

Mil

Shaw

12

21%

Spahn

11

21%

Phil

Mahaffey

15

29%

2 with

9

15%

Hous

Farrell

8

21%

Farrell

13

19%

Chi

Koonce

9

23%

Ellsworth

15

22%

NY

Hook

7

25%

Craig

17

22%

Box statistics through Saturday, August 4

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)