BASEBALL'S WEEK

August 19, 1962

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Baseball is getting dull? Not the way they went at it in Baltimore's Memorial Stadium, where there were 22,700 casualties from cannon and rifle fire. It was a pregame reenactment of the battle of Antietam. The North won on a home run in the ninth. A mystery "casualty" was Jackie Brandt, Oriole center fielder. He seemed so entranced by the flight of a ball to left center that he stood in awe as it flew past for a triple. His explanation: "I pulled a muscle standing in the outfield about two seconds before the ball was hit." Catcher Bob Tillman of Boston also stood up for what he thought to be right. It turned out to be wrong, for as he stood examining the stitches on a baseball a runner stole home. But three alert Red Sox pitchers, Gene Conley, Bill Monbouquette and Ike Delock, threw consecutive shutouts. During one six-game stretch Kansas City pitchers had a 1.50 ERA. For the next three games it rose a trifle, to 8.66. George Alusik homered in five straight games. Washington pitching during a five-game span left little to be desired by opposing batters, who got 53 hits and 37 runs. Rookie Jim Hannan, though, ran his relief streak to 14 appearances and 20‚Öì innings without a run. And the Senators did manage to take over the league lead in one department—stolen bases. Conversely, New York, which was tied for the fewest steals (21) in the majors, was first in the standings. Second-place Los Angeles had only one homer, needed four pitchers in one inning, had to do without injured Pitchers Art Fowler and Ken McBride but still won six of eight. Chicago matched that, largely because of fine pitching by Eddie Fisher (he likes to imitate Donald Duck), Early Wynn (he prefers to emulate Walter Johnson) and Ray Herbert. Howie Koplitz of Detroit won twice and Rocky Colavito and Steve Boros each hit four homers. When the going got tough, Dick Stigman of Minnesota talked to himself, liked what he heard and beat the Yankees. Speaking out loud, General Manager Gabe Paul said of sixth-place Cleveland, "I've never seen a whole team collapse all at once like this." Help was coming, however. Enrique Hernandez, a 17-year-old pitcher from Cuba, invaded the U.S. in a 16-foot boat for a tryout with the Indians.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pittsburgh endured such troubles as a Forbes Field fire that delayed a game 27 minutes, another injury to Don Hoak (he has had the flu, an infected tooth, injuries to wrist, thumb and ribs and now his eyes) and 14 losses in 17 tries. Milwaukee's Warren Spahn fell down the stairs a few hours before game time and banged his precious left elbow. Then he won his 321st game. What happened to John Callison of Philadelphia was tragicomic. After an all-out effort to knock down the right-field wall with his head, Callison, his nose bleeding profusely, was driven in a motorcycle to the safety of the dugout. Mel Roach made two errors, then had to look in the clubhouse icebox to find his glove. Dallas Green had started only four games all year, suddenly got the call twice in three days. Result: two losses and exile to the bullpen again. Charlie James of St. Louis was content to play only on Friday nights. He had a .488 BA in Friday night games, .290 for the season as a whole. Cincinnati's Frank Robinson hit six homers on five different days. Houston, shut out three times in a row by the Reds, did not score for 38 innings and lost seven of eight. Without George Altman's four homers Chicago would not have advanced to eighth. It was the saddest of weeks for New York's Casey Stengel. His Mets were eliminated from the pennant race and, worst of all, Mrs. Stengel was hit, as one paper put it, "on her right jaw" by a broken bat. Don Drysdale (see page 24) of Los Angeles lost his fifth game and walked his first man in 53 innings. The week's most damaging "hit" was one by Willie Mays of San Francisco, which went six inches behind the plate. Mays, at bat after his foul tip on a third strike had been dropped, started a rally to beat the Dodgers.

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TWO PHOTOSTURNABOUTS in new leagues were Colt .45s' Russ Kemmerer (ex-White Sox) and Twins' Frank Sullivan (ex-Phillie). Both won in relief.

RUNS PRODUCED

Runs Scored

Teammates Batted In*

Total Runs Produced

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Siebern, KC (.300)

79

66

145

Rollins, Minn (.308)

68

65

133

Robinson, Chi (.312)

63

68

131

Wagner, LA (.271)

75

51

126

Pearson, LA (.274)

90

33

123

NATIONAL LEAGUE

T. Davis, LA (.345)

87

99

186

Robinson, Cin (.341)

95

70

165

Mays, SF(.308)

94

67

161

H. Aaron, Mil (.336)

93

67

160

Cepeda, SF(.317)

77

60

137

*Derived by subtracting HRs from RBIs.

Boxed statistics through Saturday, August 11

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)