19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 02, 1962

BOBBY AND THE BOLSHIES
Sirs:
Bobby Fischer's story (The Russians Have Fixed World Chess, Aug. 20) is most impressive. He should be congratulated for bringing this stunning fact forward. It makes novice players like myself realize that the Russian domination of world chess is not a true measure of their ability.
DOUGLAS W. GREEN
Olean, N.Y.

Sirs:
Although I don't always agree with his viewpoint, I think Fischer's article is straight to the point. For years the Russians have boasted of their many great players. The world's best, they said. Why, then, must they resort to such tricks to win?
DAVID MORPHY
Youngstown, Ohio

Sirs:
Fischer was beaten, not "conned," out of the Candidates' Chess Tournament.
W. MARCUS
New York City

Sirs:
Crybaby Chess Champion Bobby Fischer has grown up. His mother formerly cried for him; now Bawling Bobby cries for himself.

Let's face it, Petrosian and Fischer each won eight games, but Petrosian lost none while Fischer lost seven.
DONALD W. STERN
Southbury, Conn.

BRAVE BONITO
Sirs:
Your fine article on Brave and Brainy Bass (Aug. 20) again brings up the old matter of pound-for-pound fighting qualities. May we once and for all lay this matter to rest—if that is possible—and state that the bonito are the toughest fish on a pound-for-pound basis. Taking bonito on light spinning gear is comparable to the "eyeballs out" strain of working a 500-pound bluefin tuna. This plain out-and-out power a bass just doesn't have.
JOHN W. STANTON
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

FISTICASTS
Sirs:
As the "indulgent dentist" referred to in the article "Mr. Boxing, Himself" (Aug. 6), may I elaborate on the story of the famous fighting fists?

Twenty-five years ago, while engaged in making mouthguards for the men boxing around New York, and being interested in the sport, I decided to use my dental materials to make life casts of the fighting fists of our champions.

At the time we had records, pictures and photographs of the champions from the days of Jim Figg to the present, but no records of what made them famous—their fists. We now have over 100 such records in the form of casts.
WALTER H. JACOBS, D.D.S.
New York City

•See below.—ED.

WHIZZER AND ETHEL
Sirs:
Last Easter Sunday I had a firsthand look at some of that "vim and vigah" practiced and preached by our new frontier (Aug. 13). In the middle of the afternoon, during the annual holiday festivities at the Bobby Kennedys' Hickory Hill mansion in McLean, Va., Bobby gathered some of the most prominent figures in the United States to engage in one of those ever-popular touch football games. Several obscure football stars, better known as Senators, radioracles and such, took part. The distinguished competitors included: Defense Secretary McNamara, Interior Secretary Udall, Television Commentator Dave Brinkley and, of course, the Attorney General. But perhaps the most prestige was supplied by the latest draftee to the Kennedy squad, the newly appointed Supreme Court Justice, Byron (Whizzer) White. As the 18-year-old son of a New York reporter, I somehow mingled in with the active participants.

The original Kennedy style of touch football consists of an unlimited number of passes thrown downfield—regardless if you cross the line of scrimmage or not. A ludicrous score is common, but this wide-open offense keeps the spectators stirring and the players running. Whizzer and Bobby used these fast-moving tactics to their advantage and completely dominated the play. Whizzer even went so far as to baffle opponents, as well as observers, by installing some of the complex maneuvers acquired from the professional ranks. It was obvious, however, that the most remarkable performer was the peppy Ethel Kennedy, wife of the Attorney General. She ran and passed with the same comparative ease and agility as the rest, hardly typical of a mother of seven. Whizzer proved to be the master of the game by craftily and skillfully moving our team up and down the field, running up the score. With Whizzer and Bobby alternating running and passing, I was used sparingly as an end. However, I can proudly claim the distinction of snaring two of Whizzer's bullet passes.

The enthusiastic guests left the playing area panting but happy.
KEVIN HEALY
Chevy Chase, Md.

WILDFOWLING
Sirs:
We try continually to counter the erroneous impression held by some people that the National Audubon Society is "anti-hunting." Therefore it was with regret we saw the Society so described in your article The Troubled Hunter (Aug. 20).

As a conservation organization, the National Audubon Society has never opposed hunting per se, although we have never hesitated to speak up when in our judgment hunting needed to be restricted or eliminated in order to conserve a species of wildlife. This is our policy with respect to all game birds and mammals.

The reason we recommend a moratorium on duck hunting this year is our concern for the resource. It is our firm belief that the safety of the waterfowl population, and even the future of wildfowling, require action now to check the decline of the breeding stock.
CARL W. BUCHHEISTER
New York City

Sirs:
Your excellent article certainly squares with my own views—except that I might go a little further and say that the federal count must be inaccurate.

I have shot over much of the United States, and I know that the duck count is not as bad as that portrayed by the bureaucrats in Washington.
H. G. SCHMIDT
Cleveland

Sirs:
This year the daily bag limit on ducks in Texas is two per day, only one of which may be a mallard, and the season lasts only 25 days. Mexico has set bag limits for a 3-month season at 15 ducks per day, and as I recall there are no restrictions as to the type of duck shot. Perhaps this is a part of the continuation of the good neighbor policy? We pay to raise the ducks so they can have their shooting fun!
R. L. MARQUIS JR.
Denton, Texas

CHANGED DON?
Sirs:
Your article on Don Drysdale (Ex-Bad Boy's Big Year, Aug. 20) was a well-earned tribute to a man who has conquered many problems to become the finest pitcher in baseball today. You presented an unbiased view of Don's recent success as well as his recent dismal past. Thank you for a job well done.
MICHAEL MATTHAY
Los Angeles

Sirs:
We suggest you look at the evidence more closely before closing the case of Don Drysdale's Big Change. At his present rate—22 games won, 7 batters hit—if Drysdale wins 30 games this season he will hit at least 10 batters, a .333 average per game.

In short, Don Drysdale is one of the biggest reasons why nobody likes the Dodgers.
T. AND J. KOEHLER
Cincinnati

PHOTO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)