A YEAR FOR STRATEGIC FINESSE

Navy depends on offense, Army on defense, but Penn State has enough of both to be the best in the East
September 23, 1962

Just across from the Naval Academy's field house there is an A3D-1 Skywarrior on display. A carrier-based aircraft, the Skywarrior is designed "to penetrate deeply into enemy territory." The plane wasn't placed there as a symbol, but it might have been, for going overhead and deep is exactly what Navy Coach Wayne Hardin (above), an intense young redhead, has in mind for the football field this fall. Hardin's battle plan, like that of most coaches, is coolly calculated. This year all five major independents—Navy, Penn State, Army, Pitt and Syracuse—play each other for the first time. Hardin, reasonably enough, assumes that the most daring team will have the best chance of winning the nonexistent but much-prized eastern championship.

The emphasis on passing hardly represents a new departure for Navy, at least not since Hardin became head coach in 1959. Hardin is a coach who firmly believes that outscoring opponents rather than waiting them out with a patient defense is the only way to play football. After three winning seasons and, more important to the Navy brass, three victories in a row over Army, he has a point.

A perfectionist, Hardin revels in the academy discipline and tradition, and indeed, he gives much credit for Navy's success to the tremendous built-in spirit, which he fosters to a loud fare-thee-well. Where some teams might straggle onto the field for practice sessions, Navy comes on with a tremoring roar. It is more like the beginning of the Army game than an ordinary practice.

"Navy likes wide-open football," says Hardin. "We think the kids and the public like it, too, and that you can give them what they like and still win. We keep thinking, trying to come up with something interesting to us and confusing to others."

This year Hardin has the players who can create both interest and confusion. Ron Klemick, a lanky, whip-armed quarterback who threw the ball with amazing effectiveness last season, completing 84 of his 183 passes, is back with a handsome complement of experienced assistants.

Navy's problems, outside of Boston College and the other eastern independents, are three: Notre Dame, Southern California and Minnesota. "We could play better this year," says Hardin, "and lose more." He is dead right. If these teams aren't rugged enough, there is the "Beat Navy" movement brewing at West Point, where Coach Paul Dietzel, lured away from LSU to restore Army's flagging football prestige, has the Cadets hopping. Unlike Navy, Dietzel's system is predicated on tough defense and a somber, almost Spartan running game that uses the pass merely as an adjunct. Like Navy, however, Dietzel also has a battle plan, and it includes a replica of his three-platooning Chinese Bandits who proved so effective in Baton Rouge.

While Navy and Army plot each other's downfall. Penn State's Rip Engle, a master at melding a sleek offense with a stout defense, is quietly building another giant in the foothills of Mount Nittany. With some uncertainty at quarterback, Engle has added the open end and man in motion to his multiple T offense to take full advantage of the best efforts of Dave Robinson, a tierce blocker and tackier who is the best end in the East, and Roger Kochman, a fast All-America halfback candidate.

Pitt, too, is stronger than it has been in several years. Coach John Michelosen has juggled his backfield to get some dash into his usually stodgy offense. With some truly bright sophomores, a phenomenon being enjoyed by many teams around the country, Syracuse is likely to be harder to beat as the season progresses. Holy Cross, with two of the finest backs anywhere in Quarterback Pat McCarthy and Halfback Tom Hennessy; Villanova, a pleasant surprise last year; and Boston College, under new Coach Jim Miller, will win much more often than they lose.

Not all the good football in the East will be played by the independents. In the Ivy League, where Columbia and Harvard, the defending co-champions, have suffered heavy losses, the competition to succeed them will be as lively as ever. Yale, unhappily, has lost too many fine backs, but Cornell and Penn both have enough returning players to rank as serious challengers. However, Princeton, with an impressive array of backfield talent, and Dartmouth, led by a superb quarterback in Bill King, will most likely decide the championship when they meet November 24 at Princeton.

Tactics in the East are turning a corner. Syracuse's Ben Schwartzwalder says, "We've reached the end of the wide stuff and now the thinking is that we have to move some folks out of the way in the line in order to move the ball. The success of the Green Bay Packers has clearly demonstrated that this is still the way to play the game. And we're going to see more action passes these next few years. The drop-back pass writes the defense too long a letter too soon."

Harvard's John Yovicsin goes even further. He sees the T formation, with its power end run and double-teaming in the off-tackle hole, borrowing more and more from the old-fashioned single wing. "We have very few original thinkers in the game today," he points out. "Men like Greasy Neale, with his 5-4 defense, Steve Owen, with his 6-1, and Dick Harlow, with his looping linemen and spinning fullbacks, made important contributions to the game. We just don't have many men like that today."

With or without innovators, football in the East will be as exciting, if not always as formidable, as anywhere in the nation. The battle for eastern supremacy and the Lambert Trophy may be joined as early as the first Saturday of the season—September 22—when Penn State and Navy meet at Beaver Stadium. State should win. The top five: 1) Penn State, 2) Navy, 3) Pitt, 4) Army, 5) Syracuse.

Amherst

Last year was a delightful one for Coach Jim Ostendarp—until Williams wrecked his Lord Jeffs in the final game. The loss cost Amherst an unbeaten season and, worst of all, the Little Three title. Although three-quarters of the fine 1961 backfield, including way-out passer Dave Lawrence, is gone, the situation on the eve of the new season isn't quite so bad as it sounds. With Fullback Bob Aplington to supply the blocking, Quarterback Mark Hallam, a daring play-caller and precise short flinger (42 for 79 in 1961), and Halfback Bill Julavits, an agile 5-foot-6 145-pounder, will keep the Amherst wing T moving. And the line has enough seasoned holdovers, headed by Ends John Hayden, a 6-foot-4 fingertip pass grabber, and Carroll Hebbel, Tackle Stu Fobes and Guard Dick Brainard, to give the Jeffs their usual stern defense. The only real problem is at center, where 200-pound Jim Bird is the best of what, charitably, is an inexperienced lot.

CONCLUSION: Amherst has a solid first unit, but there are not enough good reserves around to keep Williams from winning again.

Army

Coach Paul Dietzel, new from LSU, had a busy spring. He retired the lonely end, introduced his Chinese Bandits and still found time to beat the southern bushes for the limber-legged halfbacks he used to lure to Baton Rouge. But they won't help him this year, and Dietzel will have to spread 21 lettermen and some good sophomores over his three units. With typical deference to the defense, he has switched Defensive Halfback Harry McMillan to end to team up with John Ellerson, the best of all the linemen. Tackle Chet Kempinski and Center Marty Ryan become guards, and Lee Grasfeder moves ahead of Mike Miller at center. Dietzel will depend upon Halfbacks Ken Waldrop and Paul Stanley, who get to the line fast enough for the inside shots, and Ray Paske, a punishing fullback. At quarterback he will choose between Dick Eckert, an accurate passer when he is right, and Joe Blackgrove, who can't throw but can run.

CONCLUSION: Dietzel has changed the old Army game. Urgent on defense, quiet on offense, the Cadets will win more games.

Boston College

Mike Holovak tried and failed, Ernie Hefferle tried and failed and now Jim Miller, recently a success at Detroit, is trying. The new coach, happily, inherited 34 lettermen and 40 incoming sophomores. His starting line, averaging 218 pounds, looks like a spread formation: Ends Art Graham (210) and Bob Smith (220), Tackles Dave O'Brien (230) and Lou Cioci (225), probably the best of the seven, and Guards Dave Yelle (215) and John McGourthy (200) and Center Tom Hall (225). Behind them is another unit just as big and almost as able. Miller, who likes his straight T to flow free and easy, has Quarterback Jack Concannon, a fine passer who can throw to the sticky-handed Graham, Halfbacks John Barrett (a 9.7 sprinter) and Don Moran(a hard-running sophomore) who give the Eagles good outside speed, and "the heavy thump of Harry Crump." Crump is a 210-pound fullback who gained 471 yards last year, running mostly inside.

CONCLUSION: The Eagles are hungry for success but slowness in the line and a hard schedule may postpone the feast.

Boston University

With 19 lettermen gone and with rumors of de-emphasis flying, Coach Steve Sinko spent a thoughtful winter scouting BU's (and his own) football future. The result: a springtime switch from the wing T to the lonely end and wholesale position shifts. This year the Terriers should be more exciting. Long on halfbacks, Sinko moved Dickie Farland to quarterback, Paul Johnson to fullback and Albie Stonkus and Tom Prebola to lonely end, where they will back up Bob Horton, a fast, sure-handed 210-pounder. Halfbacks Hugh O'Flynn, Joe Di Pietro and George Byrd have good outside speed; Fullback Charlie Meadows can carry the inside load; and Quarterback Tom Daubney, a hard passer, will lead the attack. But there are too few linemen. After the first line—Nick Marchese, the tight end, Tackles Paul Kolman and Ned Handy, Guards Bill Lesinski and Bill Budness and Center Don LaTona—there is only mediocrity.

CONCLUSION: BU's de-emphasis hasn't yet reached the schedule-makers. Kansas and West Virginia will be sheer murder.

Brown

Coach John McLaughry has a happy facility for understatement. "We found ourselves at a decided disadvantage last season," he says with barely a wince. The Bruins were mauled fearfully by their Ivy League foes. Eighteen lettermen survived, but they are the same ones who scored only three touchdowns and gave up 245 points last fall. Obviously, the Bruins will have to tidy matters up. The interior line is big enough, although the linebackers are questionable. While Halfbacks Jan Moyer and Bill Lemire and Fullback Jon Meeker make the running game more proficient than it was in 1961, McLaughry must find a quarter back who can throw well enough to stir up his wing T. His choices are somewhat limited: sophomores Don Carcieri, who passes better than he runs, and Jim Dunda, who runs better than he passes, and senior Dennis Hauflaire, who does neither particularly well but is the best signal-caller.

CONCLUSION: A leaky line will keep the fast backs penned up and the Bruins entangled in the lower depths for another year.

Bucknell

An arsenal of long-range aerial bombs and a sticky defense that has led the Mid-Atlantic for two seasons in a row will keep the Bisons near the top of the conference. Coach Bob Odell has three quarterbacks, led by strong-armed southpaw Ron Giordano, who will be aiming his favorite deep passes at four experienced ends. Best of the wingmen is Dick Tyrrell, twice an all-conference selection and now bidding to become the school's alltime receiver. Rene Clements balances the other end nicely, while Center George Rieu and two sizable guards, Tom Boyd and Dick Orlowski, form a stubborn middle. With nearly 100% losses at tackle and halfback, Odell has his problems, but good sophomores are pressing last year's reserves. One of them is Halfback Hal Riley, a breakaway threat, who, along with returning Fullbacks John Barron and Joe Elliott, could provide the running balance so necessary for Bucknell's multiple T.

CONCLUSION: A proven passing attack will keep Bison foes off balance while the running matures. Bucknell should win often.

Buffalo

Convinced by two losing seasons that his Bulls can't win on passing alone, Coach Dick Offenhamer has discarded his pro-type split T for the more versatile wing T. With 23 lettermen back, including a bevy of fast backs and two seasoned lines, the Bulls are well prepared to run. Halfbacks Bob Baker, who specialized in pass catching (he grabbed 23 last year), and Gerry Ratkewicz give them the outside speed they need, while Fullback Jack Valentic, a stubby plunger, is expert at his specialty. Like an only half-reformed chain smoker, Buffalo will sneak in a pass now and then. It should, so long as it has "Long John" Stofa around. He is a lean, 6-foot-3 junior quarterback who completed 64 of 127 passes for 807 yards in 1961. The defense will be sturdier than last year's, especially when Tackles Gerry (King Kong) Philbin and Kevin Brinkworth and Center Jim Wick are in the game. Not particularly big, they nevertheless pack a wallop.

CONCLUSION: Two deep except at guard, the Bulls can't help winning more games than they did in 1961.

Colgate

Colgate men were properly chagrined when Coach Alva Kelley, who had shown signs of putting the raid back into the Red Raiders, unexpectedly retired last February. Now there is new hope. Hal Lahar, an old Chenango Valley favorite, is back after a five-year sabbatical at Houston, and he brings with him a devotion to pure defense. However, Lahar will find more enthusiasm than skill among the 13 returning lettermen, and, except for Tom McManamy, a rugged 217-pound tackle, and End Chris Lomas, his first line will be a crazy quilt of sophomores and last year's second-stringers. There are fewer worries in the backfield. Quarterback Dan Keating tends to splatter his passes but he runs well enough to make the roll-out an effective weapon in Lahar's slot and wing T, and experienced Halfbacks Jim Hellman and Jim Deegan are dependable, if not showy, runners. The big worry is at fullback. There just isn't a good one in sight.

CONCLUSION: Soft in the middle and skimpy in linebacking, the Raiders may win some skirmishes but not too many battles.

Columbia

It took Coach Buff Donelli five long years to build a winner and just a couple of hours to graduate it. Tom Haggerty, Russ Warren and Tom Vasell, who gained more than a mile from scrimmage and accounted for 21 touchdowns, are gone. Only two starters remain—Guard Tony Day and Fullback Tom O'Connor. Donelli will refurbish his backfield with Archie Roberts Jr., a gifted sophomore quarterback, who, they say, passes like a pro, runs like a halfback and booms his punts 60 yards. With O'Connor available to handle the inside slashing, the big job will be to find able halfbacks to complement Roberts' abundant talents in Donelli's tricky wing T. Lackaday, Mike Hassan, a skittery runner, is the only one around with any real experience. Even so, the real worries are in the line, where the pickings are lean indeed. The best bets: End Ron Drotos; Lou Asack, 240-pound "little" brother of all-East Tackle Bob; and Jack Strauch, a sophomore linebacker.

CONCLUSION: The Lions have suffered too many casualties, especially on defense, to avoid a return to mediocrity.

Connecticut

Once the scourge of Yankee rivals, the Huskies were forced to beat a disorderly retreat last year. Connecticut's cloud-of-dust split T disintegrated for lack of a passer, and the team lost seven games. Now, with shiny new sophomore quarterbacks who can throw the ball, Coach Bob Ingalls has gone to a balanced T with multiple flankers. Lou Aceto, who passes well long or short, and Jack Redmond, a long thrower, will lend more variety to the attack, making it easier for a flock of limber-legged halfbacks, led by Tony Magaletta and Dave Korponai, to break away. Another sophomore, Dave Roberts, will be at fullback. Despite some softness at end, where sophomore Joe Hassett should star, the line is big enough to pack a two-way wallop and fast enough to keep up with the new offense. Men like Tackle John Contoulis, a remarkably agile 263-pounder, and bruising Linebacker Tom Doty won't be easily moved.

CONCLUSION: A more airy attack will help the UConns battle Massachusetts for the title. All depends on the sophomores.

Cornell

Coach Tom Harp's first year at Cornell was hardly a joyous one. His best backs turned up sore-legged and his lonely end attack was so lonely it often seemed desolate. Only Quarterback Gary Wood looked good. A slick option runner, he is back to lead the offense. He ran for 449 yards last year and, although he completed only 28 of his 75 passes, they were good for 456 yards and six touchdowns. Unfortunately, the ends, Ed Burnap and John McCarthy (the new lonely one), are merely adequate, and the other backs—Bob Milne, Jim Lampkins and Paul Shank—have more spirit than speed. A solid interior line, headed by Tackles Ed Slisky (225) and Jerry Stremick (215), will need every bit of its heft to hold the holes open long enough for the backs to get through. Of course, there is always Pete Gogolak, the unorthodox place-kicker from Hungary, to boot one off the side of his foot when the situation calls for it.

CONCLUSION: A determined defense and Wood's brilliance will hold off some teams, but not Princeton or Dartmouth.

Dartmouth

In this era of football trickery there are few who possess more ingenuity than Dartmouth Coach Bob Blackman. He delights in jabbing his foes off balance with a seemingly endless variety of stunting defenses and hornswoggles them with the V formation, a multiplicity of split ends, slot and wingbacks and men in motion. His one shortcoming, generally, is material. This year he may have it. The ends, Mike Nyquist and Charlie Greer, are alert defenders, while Center Don McKinnon, a bruising 215-pound line backer, and Tackles Bill Blumenschein and Dale Runge, just as big, lend tautness to the interior line. The hub of the attack is Quarterback Bill King, last year's Ivy League total offense leader, who is equally proficient at throwing the ball or running the roll-out. King will get plenty of help from junior Halfbacks Tom Spangenberg and Dave Lawson, who are hardy enough to slam the line and swift enough to run for long gains.

CONCLUSION: Despite some ifs—at guard and fullback—the Indians will carve enough Ivy scalps to fight Princeton for the title.

Delaware

After two years of enforced servitude in the Mid-Atlantic Conference, things are looking up for the Blue Hens. Coach Dave Nelson, whose imaginative wing T thrives on quick, pony-sized backs and mobile linemen, has gathered together enough of both to make Delaware a favorite for the title. Halfbacks Mike Brown, an elusive 9.7 sprinter, and Joe Slobojan, who dodges and darts like a harried mosquito, will lead opponents a merry outside chase while Quarterback Ted Kempski throws short passes. However, Fullback Tom Michaels is too small for the inside pounding, and that is Nelson's biggest worry. There is some weakness at defensive end, too, but such unrelenting interior linemen as 240-pound Tackle Dick Evers and 230-pound John Scholato, the middle guard, will snuff out attacks in the center. The flanks, once sophomores Ron Bianco and Jack Messina, back after a year's layoff, get the hang of things, will be better.

CONCLUSION: They say Nelson invented the wing T. If he can invent a substitute for interior power, the Hens will finish a top the MAC.

Gettysburg

After three years of Earl Little's precise passing, the Bullets are in for some dull Saturdays. The new quarterback, Vance Johnston, is only a fair thrower. The runners will have to move the ball, meaning Coach Gene Haas must spread his stylish halfbacks around the backfield. Small but powerful Rick Taylor goes to fullback, leaving Phil Parsons, who caught 22 passes last year, Barry Gruber and sophomore Ken Snyder, a cutback sprinter, to handle the outside running. Except for Ends Barry Shaw and Dave Wehr, there are too many low-powered Bullets in the line. Tackle Tom Schreiner uses his 240 pounds to good advantage on defense, but the guards, Dick Wix and Bob Nelson, require more back-stopping than they are likely to get from sophomores. The one bright spot is at center, where Bob Duncan can play offense and defense, freeing Bob Furney, a durable 205-pounder, to help out at guard or tackle.

CONCLUSION: Without Little's passing, the Bullets' split T will be fair game for stacked defenses.

Harvard

Like most Ivy League coaches, Harvard's John Yovicsin can rarely anticipate what fall will bring. But this year he has a fairly good idea and he isn't altogether happy. Graduation tore apart the fine line that helped the Crimson to a share of the Ivy title in 1961. With Tackle Ed Smith the only regular left, Yovicsin will move Guard Brad Stephens to center and fill in the bare spots with reserves Dave Hudepohl (end), Dick Diehl (tackle) and Bill Southmayd (guard). Happily, there is distinction in the backfield and Harvard will have a good offense. Last year's sophomore quarterbacks, Mike Bassett and Bill Humenuk, are both back, along with all-Ivy Fullback Bill Grana, a substantial blocker and plunger, and Right Half Bill Taylor. Better still, Terry Bartolet, the passing leader in 1960, and Hobie Armstrong, a strong runner who relies on speed rather than finesse for his yardage, are back in academic good graces after a year of penance.

CONCLUSION: There will be Saturdays, perhaps one too many, when Yovicsin will yearn for the linemen of yesteryear.

Holy Cross

Dr. Eddie Anderson is by nature a cautious man. Even with the nation's second most prolific ground-gainer, the fourth best pass receiver and a backfield that would make any coach envious, the good doctor is fretting over what he thinks is a slightly spongy middle line—good starters but no depth. Maybe so, but opponents are going to find it difficult containing the likes of End Barry Tyne, who snared five touchdown tosses in 1961; 226-pound Tackle Dennis Golden; and Jon Morris, a 222-pound center-linebacker. Then there is the backfield. Whatever Crusader weaknesses emerge, they will be hardly noticeable once Quarterback Pat McCarthy, the best in the East, gets his hands on the ball. Last year he threw for 1,081 yards (76 for 165) and 11 touchdowns and ran for 512 more yards and eight scores. There are also speedy Halfbacks Tom Hennessy and Al Snyder, who caught 38 passes, to keep the Crusaders on the move.

CONCLUSION: With McCarthy at the helm, Anderson's exciting multiple T will bother even Syracuse and Penn State.

Lafayette

Give or take a few players, Coach Jim McConlogue is in pretty much the same fix that he was a year ago. There are enough lettermen (18) to fill the voids, but his Leopards are spotty at the tackles and halfbacks and inoffensive at fullback. Still, not all is gloom and despair for McConlogue. He isn't worried about his ends, and the center of the line, where Marty Shane and his sure-tackling linebacking understudy, Harvey Shapiro, are flanked by low-slung Guards Jim Giudice and Jay LaSalle. Jerry Foley, a 210-pound former guard, will reinforce the tackles. However, Quarterback Dom Viscomi isn't likely to scare anyone with his fluttery passes and George Hossenlopp, a gifted sophomore, may have to move in quickly to bring some flair to the flanker T. An exciting passer, he also can run the ball when he has to. That may be often. Halfbacks Dave Ahouse and John Brown are just average and Fullback Jack Stutz's line-bucking is suspect.

CONCLUSION: Unless George can do it, the Leopards' landlocked attack is likely to get swallowed up in its own mediocrity.

Lehigh

Bill Leckonby, who led the Engineers to the Lambert Cup last year, is now relaxing in the athletic director's chair, leaving the field chores to his line coach, Mike Cooley. He also left behind a couple of rather large holes at tackle, formerly filled by 260-pound Reed Bohovich and Mike Semcheski. Fortunately, the rest of the line is secure. Harold Milton heads up a competent group of ends, and there is sufficient talent to staff a tight middle, but it will be up to Charlie Gibson and transfer Don Marshall, who are neither as big nor as forbidding as the departed stars, to plug the gaps at tackle. With somewhat less substance at these key posts, Cooley may have to resort to more split T daring to move the ball. And here the Engineers are well fixed. They have two fine quarterbacks in John DeNoia, who throws for distance, and Walt King, deadly on short passes, and a skittish halfback in Pat Clark, who ran for nine touchdowns last year.

CONCLUSION: The quality is here for the Engineers to make a real run at the Mid-Atlantic title—if Delaware doesn't beat them to it.

Maine

The Black Bears were a tenacious lot last year. A blocked punt here, an extra point there, and suddenly they had their first Yankee Conference title in nine years. However, the entire backfield and four starting linemen are gone, and now Coach Harold Westerman is faced with repairs. He has enough strapping linemen—like Tackles John Roberts (230 pounds) and Dan Severson (225) and Center Phil Soule (225)—to stiffen his multiple defenses, and the ends, 6-foot-6 Bob Robertson and Don Streeter, back in school after a year's sabbatical, can grab passes. But, alas, there just isn't anyone to throw to them. Senior Quarterback Tom Austin is an ordinary passer and his sophomore brother Ray is untested. The Bears will have to run. That leaves it up to Halfbacks Dave Brown, Earle Cooper and sophomore Mike Haley, all with good getaway speed, and Fullback Bill Chard. The four will wish that defense had never been invented.

CONCLUSION: Without a thrower, Westerman's wing T often will settle for three runs and a punt. Another title? Not likely.

Massachusetts

Any time a coach loses 17 lettermen he begins to think about retiring. Vic Fusia has other ideas. Richly endowed with sophomores, he hopes to win the Yankee Conference title. At least five will start, the brightest of them being Quarterback Jerry Whelchel, a tricky runner and accurate passer who will give Fusia's T considerably more mobility than it had a year ago. Leo Biron, another first-year quarterback, has been shifted to left half, from where he can pass or run. This leaves Sam Lussier, who gained 609 yards and scored six touchdowns last year, and Fullback Ken Palm, a straightaway plunger, to tend to the ground game. On the line Bob Burke, a strong 225-pounder, moves in to help 230-pound Paul Graham at tackle. Dick Bordelais will team with Paul Majeski at end to give the Redmen two fine pass receivers. Peter Pietz, a vicious blocker and linebacker in spring practice, takes over at guard.

CONCLUSION: The young Redmen will make mistakes, but not enough to keep them from challenging Connecticut.

Muhlenberg

One would think that 18 returning lettermen and an influx of eligible freshmen would be enough to guarantee Coach Ray Whispel peace of mind. True—except that two of his four missing starters are Quarterback Rollie Houseknecht and Halfback Charlie Kuntzleman, who, between them, accounted for 75% of the Mules' total yardage last year. Without them, the offense could be hopelessly ineffective. Sophomore Lynn Rothrock will try to take up the slack at quarter, but Dean Lowe, a loping runner and pass catcher, and Dave Brown, an elusive sophomore, will have to scratch out most of the gains on the ground. To further complicate matters, the same small defenders who gave up 223 points last year are back. They will have to show startling improvement to keep opposing backs from pouring through the line. The sturdiest—Tackles Ron Barlok and Sam Beidleman and Guard Dan Poust—aren't quite good enough.

CONCLUSION: Even with sophomore help, the lowly Mules are in over their heads in the tough Mid-Atlantic Conference.

Navy

Navy's spring practice field resembled Gettysburg after Pickett's charge. The Middies started with 66 able-bodied seamen, but lost 23 with injuries along the way. By now most of the bruises and broken bones have healed, and Coach Wayne Hardin is prepared to enjoy his riches. He is three deep in good quarterbacks, three deep in fullbacks and there are ample running backs and high-spirited linemen to help them move the ball. In fact, there is so much talent that T Quarterback Ron Klemick, who was the country's fourth best passer last year (he completed 84 of 183 for 1,045 yards), could lose his job to Bruce Abel. Fullbacks Dick Merritt and Nick Markoff are in danger of being chased to the bench by sophomore Pat Donnelly, a 195-pound line-crusher who scored 10 touchdowns for the plebes. The line is tough. Tackle Ron Testa, a strong 224-pounder, and Guards Vern Von Sydow and Steve Hoy are the best men there.

CONCLUSION: The battle-hardened Middies have plenty of everything to challenge Penn State for the Lambert Trophy.

New Hampshire

Some serious backfield losses have given Coach Chief Boston reason to be concerned about his lonely end offense. Most of all, he needs a quarterback to pitch to the far-out end, Chuck Grzbielski. The most likely choice is Bob Klimasewski, a rangy sophomore. If Klim can spread the defenses sufficiently with his passes to let fast Halfbacks Dan Serieka and Jim Edgerly exploit their outside speed and if Coach Boston can find a plunger to fill the empty fullback slot—but those are too many ifs, aren't they? The line is more comforting. Although not big, it presents a solid front on defense and is quick enough to set the wing T in motion. Tight End Dick Benz and the 200-pound tackles, Bob Weeks and converted Fullback Fred DiQuattro, have the strength and skill to be firm with opposing linemen, while Barry Stiber and Paul Harvey, a hard-blocking sophomore, will do a lot to relieve the uncertainty at the guards.

CONCLUSION: The Wildcats' defense is staunch enough to contain Yankee rivals. The offense, though, will scare nobody.

Pennsylvania

After two years in the Ivy League cellar, the Quakers are cautiously optimistic. And why not? Twenty-three lettermen, including all the tenacious specialists who led the nation in pass defense in 1961, are back. With such an affluence of material, it is reasonable to expect that Penn will be more formidable. But Coach John Stiegman's optimism is tempered by several hard facts. His interior line suffered severely when Tackle Nick Robak decided to enter the priesthood and scrappy Guard Mike Branca gave up football. Except for experienced End Ron Alls-house, the flanks are vulnerable and Stiegman desperately needs a passer to move his single wing. Fullback Dick Detwiler and Tailback John Owens, a restless sprinter who can sift through the tackle holes or scoot on wide sweeps with equal alacrity, give the Quakers more than enough running, but Owens' passes too often flutter like shuttlecocks.

CONCLUSION: Even with an abundance of seasoned hands, the Quakers will have trouble in their well-balanced league.

Penn State

The Nittany Lions, who struck a loud blow for eastern football when they manhandled Georgia Tech in the Gator Bowl last December, are well fortified to defend their Lambert Trophy honors. Few will run through or around 220-pound End Dave Robinson, an authentic All-America, 245-pound Tackle Charlie Sieminski or 230-pound Harrison Rosdahl. Joe Galardi, moved from guard, will fill the vacant center hole. Coach Rip Engle, who prides himself on his multiple T offense, has a few new tricks up his sleeve. For one thing, he will use an open end and man in motion to spread the defense. This will give Left Half Roger Kochman more opportunity to explode to the outside, while Right Half Al Gursky and alternating Fullbacks Dave Hayes and Buddy Torris shred the middle. Engle's big worry is finding a quarterback to replace Galen Hall. The best bet is Don Caum, an adept roll-out runner and adequate passer.

CONCLUSION: Lacking an outstanding quarterback, Engle is wary, but the Lions will be the best in the East—if they can beat Navy.

Pittsburgh

Last year's Panthers were overrun (for 1,780 yards), overpassed (for 13 touchdowns) and overscored (by 64 points). The whole business so distressed Coach John Michelosen that he turned to the gang-up defense that new assistant Frank Lauterbur brought from Army. If the ends can shepherd opposing backs inside, where Tackles Gary Kaltenbach, a fierce-hitting 237-pounder, and Ed Adamchik, 226, and forceful Linebackers Tom Brown and Lou Slaby can batter them, the defense should be surer. Michelosen also has tried to brighten up his normally staid wing T. With Jim Traficant, a good passer who can't run, and sophomore Fred Mazurek, a showy runner who passes only moderately well, available at quarterback, he has moved Paul Martha to flanker back to take advantage of his speed and pass-catching ability. Hopefully there will be more room now inside for Fullback Rick Leeson's line plunges.

CONCLUSION: A more harassing defense and, at last, some outside speed will make Pitt formidable—but, oh, that schedule!

Princeton

This year the Princeton woods are full of Tigers. Four deep in precious tailbacks and secure everywhere else, Coach Dick Colman's only real concern is how to make the most judicious use of his riches. For a starter at tailback he can tap Greg Riley, a surefooted sprinter and competent short passer who rushed 724 yards last season. Behind Riley are Pete Porietis, who ran for 389 yards and passed for 304 more, Hugh McMillan and Dave Ibbeken. The wingbacks aren't quite so plentiful, but Dan Terpack and exciting Jim Rockenbach can run the deep reverses that are the heart of Colman's powerful single wing and they have Quarterback John Henrich, a crunching 205-pound blocker, and Fullback Bill Merlini to spring them loose. The line is peopled with devastating blockers and sure defenders. The best are End Barry Schuman, Tackles Ed Costello and Arlyn Lichthardt, and Guard Tim Callard, who leads the sweeps.

CONCLUSION: Princeton has all the hungry Tigers it needs to climb back up to the Ivy League championship.

Rhode Island

Perhaps the best thing that Coach John Chironna can do this year is sit back, relax and wait for better times. Although 16 lettermen return, the talent is sparse at Little Rhody and there is scant sophomore help in sight. For example, Chironna will have two backs covering the ends, his line is filled with mediocrity and there is not enough speed in the backfield to stir up even a faint Newport breeze. Except for Tackles Alan Arbuse, a fleshy 248-pounder, and Marvin Glaubach, an earnest but limited 214-pound laborer, there are few Ram linemen big enough to butt heads with Yankee Conference rivals. Quarterback Mike Pariseau is only a fair runner and passer, and the others—Halfbacks Paul Faulkner and Frank Kapusinsky and Fullback Frank Finizio—have more diligence than ability. The one hope is Quarterback Greg Gutter. He has shown some aptitude as a passer and may keep the Rams from slipping into oblivion.

CONCLUSION: Last year's losers are rarely this year's winners. It looks like a long hard season for the hurting Rams.

Rutgers

Last season the Scarlet Knights charged to their first unbeaten season. Graduation ate deeply into Rutgers' two-team ranks, but there are still enough able hands around to guarantee more than ordinary success. Interior linemen like Tackles Tony Simonelli and Tom Tappen, Guard Tony Hoeflinger and Center Jon Paulson, although not overly large, are combative enough to make the front wall mobile on offense and strong defensively. The wings, too, will be adequately protected by Bob Flower and Bill Craft, who now becomes the flanker end and chief pass catcher. But Coach John Bateman, for all his adroit maneuvering with his flashy double wing T, will have some trouble. Bob Yaksick, the defensive specialist who replaces Quarterbacks Sam Mudie and Bill Speranza, has yet to prove himself as a passer or runner, and Drew Carollo is no Steve Simms at fullback. Halfback Bill Thompson will have to carry the attack.

CONCLUSION: Independent Rutgers, out of the Mid-Atlantic Conference and in search of bigger game, may be thwarted this year.

Syracuse

At first glance it would appear that the general exodus that swept away 26 lettermen, including All-America Ernie Davis, the entire backfield and most of the interior line, left the Orangemen short of able bodies. Not so. Coach Ben Schwartzwalder has two good ends, a green but eager 218-pound line and a splendid crop of swift sophomore backs. With 225-pound Walt Sweeney and 215-pound John Mackey, a superb blocker, defender and pass catcher, at the ends, John Paglio, a rough 230-pounder, at outside tackle, and steady Dave Meggyesy at guard, the tender spots in the line may not be too noticeable. The attack, though, could be sputtery at first. Bob Lelli, a quick thrower, has the edge over 6-foot-3 Walt Sofsian at quarterback. Chunky Bill Schoonover and Don King will be the halfbacks and Bill Meyers the fullback. But before long the best sophomores-Fullback Jim Nance and Half back Billy Hunter, a 9.8 sprinter—take over.

CONCLUSION: With newcomers all around, the Orangemen will be learning in October, teaching in November.

Temple

The Owls aren't quite up to challenging for the Mid-Atlantic title, but neither are they prepared to submit passively. Coach George Makris has succeeded in arousing them from their long sleep, their losses were negligible and 23 lettermen are back. The line doesn't pack too much bulk but it has handy ends in John McGinley and John McNeill to protect the flanks, and a limber, hard-hitting tackle in Bill Lites. The middle could stand some stiffening on defense, and here sophomores like 200-pound Bill Juzwiak and 220-pound Ron Koehler will help. Dave Fecak, Don Council and sophomore Fred Fuchs are feathery runners, while Tom Stricker and strong Ernie Wayland, who hits like a fullback should, will keep the defenses busy between the tackles. The only flaw in the unbalanced T is Quarterback Bill Grubb's passing. If it doesn't improve, he may have to give way to Joe Morelli or sophomore Mark Lichtenfeld.

CONCLUSION: Better all around, with more reserves, the Owls will surprise a few people and almost surely better last year's record.

Trinity

Coach Dan Jessee starts his 31st year at Trinity with enough seasoned Bantams to make rivals quaver. For example, his back-field is loaded with experience everywhere but at fullback. Halfback John Szumczyk, a sturdy 200-pounder who bashes away inside the tackles or scoots to the outside (he gained 630 yards last year) with equal facility, is the workhorse of the slot T attack. Scatback Tom Calabrese is small (5 feet 8, 160 pounds) but swift on the sweeps, and Quarterback Don Taylor will give the Bantams just enough passing to keep the defenses spread. And, if senior Carl Lundborg can't make it at fullback, Jessee can always shift Szumczyk there and let Bill Campbell take over at half. Ahead of them will be a reasonably solid front with enough depth, at least by Trinity standards, to look good. End Sam Winner, Tackle Bill Howland, Guard Mike Schulenberg and Center Bill Fox, the best of the lot, will operate two ways.

CONCLUSION: New Englanders take note: the Bantams won't be big but they will be obstreperous, especially on attack.

Tufts

While most college coaches strive mightily for new offensive tricks, Coach Harry Arlanson remains singularly successful with an old formula. He simply finds himself a couple of big, smashing tackles and a quick, hard-hitting full back and turns them loose in his version of the Chicago Bear T. Arlanson has the ingredients again this year: Tackles Carmine Parisi (260 pounds) and Don Curtis (240) and Fullback Ron Deveaux, whose bursts through quick-opening gaps have piled up 1,376 yards and 17 touchdowns in two seasons. The Jumbos' talent doesn't end there. Halfbacks Ralph Doran and sophomore Steve Karp are excellent runners, while Quarterback Dennis Hickey, a reluctant but accurate southpaw passer, is well equipped to disperse any defense that concentrates on Tufts' ground game. In the line, the guard spots may be a problem until converted End John Morine and sophomore Bob Long get their bearings.

CONCLUSION: Arlanson has not had a losing season in 27 years. The Jumbos will trample enough teams to keep his record intact.

Vermont

Ready or not, the Catamounts are in the Yankee Conference up to their ears. They play every league rival but Connecticut. For the occasion, they lured Coach Bob Clifford down from Colby to replace Ed Donnelly and handed him 16 lettermen and an unbeaten freshman team. It sounds like a lot, but Clifford, who likes to spice his tricked-up T with outside swiftness, will need time to find the right combination. Quarterbacks Paul Harris and John Greer, if they can avoid injuries, are adept, and junior Halfback Ken Burton is quick enough to turn an end, but the rest of the spark will have to come from sophomores. The best are Halfback Deane Kent, who scored six touchdowns for the freshmen, and Fullback Dick Reynolds, a good plunger. Up front, End Frank Bolden and Tackle John Fyfe provide sound protection, but experienced Guard Dave Sequist, as good as he is, needs help in the middle. Hopefully it will come from sophomores.

CONCLUSION: If nothing else, Clifford will have the Catamounts attacking voraciously. But their young claws need more sharpening.

Villanova

After years of depression, happy days came at last to the oppressed Wildcats, who enjoyed every minute of them—all the way to the Sun Bowl. The schedule is a mite tougher this time, but only two starters are missing from Coach Alex Bell's harassing, stunting defense that was third in the nation. Tackle Jack Helm has been switched to center, where he will be backed up by blocky sophomore Chappy Moore, and Harry Walter, another precocious sophomore, will fill in at tackle. Otherwise the cast is the same: Joe Cutroneo and Jack Clifford at end; 240-pound Charlie Johnson at tackle; Bob Kowalski and Al Calligaris at guard. In the backfield Bell has Quarterbacks Ted Aceto, an accurate passer, and Rich Rich-man, a daring option runner; Halfback Larry Glueck (400 yards rushing in 1961 and 19 pass receptions); and 245-pound Fullback Billy Joe, who hits with the finesse of a steamroller.

CONCLUSION: Not as deep as last year, the Wildcats have a forbidding line and new offensive quirks which should win for them.

Wesleyan

Last year's Cardinals were a disorganized flock who had to fly for their lives. Now, a year older and a year wiser, 19 of them are back and determined to make their New England neighbors pay for their 1961 indiscretions. Coach Norm Daniels also has the best group of sophomores he has welcomed in five years and a few of them will be pushing lettermen for starting jobs. One upper-classman who won't be moved is Jim Dooney, a crisp-blocking guard who leads the wing T sweeps. Nor will Dave Ransom, a rough and ready junior who goes back to tackle after a year at end, and Center Dick Crockett. They form the nucleus of a potentially fine line. However, Daniels needs more rip in his backfield. Dave Snyder, a straightaway runner, will do at fullback, but senior Quarterback Steve Humphrey and Halfbacks Gerry Miller and Alan Weiner may have to give way to such sophomores as Sandy Creed and Ted Dreyfus.

CONCLUSION: Improved in pass defense and attack, Wesleyan is not good enough to challenge for the Little Three title.

Williams

Coach Len Watters is retiring at the end of the season, and for once he isn't complaining about his material. He has fast halfbacks and strong fullbacks to spare, tackles and guards stacked up three deep, enough promising sophomores to fill out the other spots, and the defense will be almost as sturdy as it was in 1961 when it gave up only 32 points. Center Mike Reily, a vigorous 215-pounder who hits hard enough to be New England's best, and Tackles John Bell (215) and Ben Wagner (220) will hold together a line that is slightly weak only at the ends. Watters' straight and split T won't be overwhelming but, should Quarterback Doug Fearon come through as a passer, the attack should be better than last year's popgun offense. The Ephmen have swift Halfbacks Tom Todd, Tim Goodwin, Chris Hagy and Jim Leitz, a sophomore, to handle the wide stuff, and blocky Fullback Eke Nadel to smash up the middle.

CONCLUSION: Even without passing, an un-giving defense will guarantee Watters one last Little Three title in his 15th year.

Yale

At least one Ivy coach claims that Yale's offense is always predictable—belly series right or left, inside or outside, a trap and an occasional pass. Well, this year it may be even more predictable. Coach Jordan Olivar lost the nub of his T attack at graduation—ends, center, quarterback and fullback. Then came the sad news that No. 2 Fullback Rich Niglio was an academic casualty. Luckily, the defensive interior is in good hands: Dave Mawicke and Perry Wickstrom at the tackles, Wolf Dietrich, Stan Riveles and Billy Kay at guard. Olivar's big problem is down the middle. Jim Thompson, a sturdy 200-pounder, may do at center, but Brian Rapp and Tim O'Connell, the quarterbacks, are only fair passers, and Rapp's running may have been slowed by an off-season knee operation. To Halfbacks Henry Higdon, small but peppery, and Randy Egloff, a talented pass receiver, is left the job of stirring up the attack.

CONCLUSION: A tighter defense will help, but the feeble offense will keep the Elis scrambling for their lives against Ivy foes.

[originallink:10512456:43611]

ILLUSTRATIONSAUL LAMBERT PHOTO

SOPHOMORE TO WATCH

Fullback Jim Nance of Syracuse University
Big, fast backs have become the fashion at Syracuse, and the 6-foot-1, 220-pound Jim Nance may yet turn out to be another Ernie Davis or Jim Brown. Nance's credentials are impressive. He was a two-time All-America at Indiana (Pa.) Joint High School, and last year as a Syracuse freshman he exploded for touchdown runs of 75 yards against Buffalo and 50 yards against Army. Built with the thick neck of a wrestler (in the off season that is just what he is, and he twice has won the Pennsylvania state high school heavyweight title), Nance is a bursting runner who depends more upon power than niftiness to break through. However, once past the line of scrimmage, he can match his speed with the best of defensive halfbacks. What delights Coach Ben Schwartzwalder even more, he also is a fierce blocker and linebacker.

Amherst
1961 record: Won 7, lost 1

Sept. 29

Springfield

(24-0)

Oct. 6

at American Intl.

(28-14)

Oct. 13

at Bowdoin

(27-6)

Oct. 20

Coast Guard

(40-7)

Oct. 27

at Wesleyan

(48-8)

Nov. 3

Tufts

(40-6)

Nov. 10

at Trinity

(22-8)

Nov. 17

Williams

(0-12)

Army
1961 record: Won 6, lost 4

Sept. 22

Wake Forest

(no game)

Sept. 29

Syracuse at New York

(no game)

Oct. 6

at Michigan

(8-38)

Oct. 13

Penn State

(10-6)

Oct. 20

VPI

(no game)

Oct. 27

at Geo. Washington

(no game)

Nov. 3

at Boston U.

(31-7)

Nov. 10

Oklahoma State

(no game)

Nov. 17

Pitt at New York

(no game)

Dec. 1

Navy at Philadelphia

(7-13)

Boston College
1961 record: Won 4, losl 6

Sept. 22

Detroit

(3-20)

Sept. 29

at Villanova

(22-6)

Oct. 6

VMI

(no game)

Oct. 13

at Syracuse

(13-28)

Oct. 20

Navy

(no game)

Oct. 27

Houston

(0-21)

Nov. 3

at Vanderbilt

(no game)

Nov. 10

Texas Tech

(6-14)

Nov. 17

Boston U.

(10-7)

Dec. 1

Holy Cross

(26-38)

Boston University
1961 record: Won 4, lost 5

Sept. 22

Buffalo, N

(12-24)

Sept. 29

Kansas, N

(no game)

Oct. 6

at West Virginia

(12-6)

Oct. 13

at G. Washington

(20-6)

Oct. 20

Richmond, N

(no game)

Oct. 27

at Massachusetts

(21-7)

Nov. 3

Army

(7-31)

Nov. 10

at Connecticut

(14-6)

Nov. 17

at Boston College

(7-10)

Brown
1961 record: Won 0, lost 9

Sept. 22

at Colgate

(6-30)

Sept. 29

at Columbia

(0-50)

Oct. 6

Yale

(3-14)

Oct. 13

Dartmouth

(0-34)

Oct. 20

at Penn

(0-7)

Oct. 27

Rhode Island

(9-12)

Nov. 3

at Princeton

(0-52)

Nov. 10

Cornell

(0-25)

Nov. 17

at Harvard

(6-21)

Bucknell
1961 record: Won 6, lost 3

Sept. 22

Gettysburg

(12-6)

Sept. 29

at Temple, N

(8-7)

Oct. 6

Massachusetts

(no game)

Oct. 13

at Lehigh

(7-12)

Oct. 20

Lafayette

(13-0)

Oct. 27

at Muhlenberg

(27-0)

Nov. 3

Buffalo

(12-6)

Nov. 10

Colgate

(0-13)

Nov. 17

at Delaware

(22-14)

Buffalo
1961 record: Won 4, lost 5

Sept. 22

at Boston U., N

(24-12)

Sept. 29

at Holy Cross

(8-20)

Oct. 6

Villanova

(6-28)

Oct. 13

Delaware

(12-36)

Oct. 20

at Temple, N

(30-3)

Oct. 27

Ohio U.

(no game)

Nov. 3

at Bucknell

(6-12)

Nov. 10

at Gettysburg

(14-6)

Nov. 17

Colgate

(no game)

Colgate
1961 record: Won 5, lost 4

Sept. 22

Brown

(30-6)

Sept. 29

at Cornell

(0-34)

Oct. 6

Holy Cross

(no game)

Oct. 13

at Rutgers

(6-26)

Oct. 20

at Princeton

(15-0)

Oct. 27

at Yale

(14-8)

Nov. 3

Lehigh

(15-20)

Nov. 10

at Bucknell

(13-0)

Nov. 17

at Buffalo

(no gome)

Columbia
1961 record: Won 6, lost 3

Sept. 29

Brown

(50-0)

Oct. 6

at Princeton

(20-30)

Oct. 13

Yale

(11-0)

Oct. 20

Harvard

(26-14)

Oct. 27

Lehigh

(7-14)

Nov. 3

Cornell

(35-7)

Nov. 10

at Dartmouth

(35-14)

Nov. 17

at Penn

(37-6)

Nov. 24

Rutgers

(19-32)

Connecticut
1961 record: Won 2, lost 7

Sept. 29

at Yale

(0-18)

Oct. 6

Rutgers

(12-35)

Oct. 13

at Massachusetts

(13-31)

Oct. 20

Maine

(0-2)

Oct. 27

at Delaware

(no game)

Nov. 3

at New Hampshire

(30-23)

Nov. 10

Boston U.

(6-14)

Nov. 17

Rhode Island

(37-0)

Nov. 24

at Holy Cross

(3-14)

Cornell
1961 record: Won 3, lost 6

Sept. 29

Colgate

(34-0)

Oct. 6

Harvard

(0-14)

Oct. 13

at Navy

(7-31)

Oct. 20

at Yale

(0-12)

Oct. 27

Princeton

(25-30)

Nov. 3

at Columbia

(7-35)

Nov. 10

at Brown

(25-0)

Nov. 17

Dartmouth

(14-15)

Nov. 24

at Penn

(31-0)

Dartmouth
1961 record: Won 6, lost 3

Sept. 29

Massachusetts

(no game)

Oct. 6

Penn

(30-0)

Oct. 13

at Brown

(34-0)

Oct. 20

Holy Cross

(13-17)

Oct. 27

at Harvard

(15-21)

Nov. 3

at Yale

(24-8)

Nov. 10

Columbia

(14-35)

Nov. 17

at Cornell

(15-14)

Nov. 24

at Princeton

(24-6)

Delaware
1961 record: Won 4, lost 4

Sept. 22

at Lehigh

(14-6)

Sept. 29

at Gettysburg

(no game)

Oct. 6

Lafayette

(34-0)

Oct. 13

at Buffalo

(36-12)

Oct. 20

Villonova

(no gome)

Oct. 27

Connecticut

(no game)

Nov. 3

at Temple, N

(28-0)

Nov. 10

Rutgers

(19-27)

Nov. 17

Bucknell

(14-22)

Gettysburg
1961 record: Won 3, lost 5, tied 1

Sept. 22

at Bucknell

(6-12)

Sept. 29

Delaware

(no game)

Oct. 6

at Lehigh

(6-20)

Oct. 13

at Albright

(21-37)

Oct. 20

Muhlenberg

(22-8)

Oct. 27

at Lafayette

(6-0)

Nov. 3

Wittenberg

(no game)

Nov. 10

Buffalo

(6-14)

Nov. 17

at Temple

(0-0)

Harvard
1961 record: Won 6, lost 3

Sept. 29

Lehigh

(17-22)

Oct. 6

at Cornell

(14-0)

Oct. 13

Holy Cross

(no game)

Oct. 20

at Columbia

(14-26)

Oct. 27

Dartmouth

(21-15)

Nov. 3

Penn

(37-6)

Nov. 10

at Princeton

(9-7)

Nov. 17

Brown

(21-6)

Nov. 24

Yale

(27-0)

Holy Cross
1961 record: Won 7, lost 3

Sept. 29

Buffalo

(20-8)

Oct. 6

at Colgate

(no game)

Oc. 13

at Harvard

(no game)

Oct. 20

at Dartmouth

(17-13)

Oct. 27

Syracuse

(6-34)

Nov. 3

at Dayton

(28-0)

Nov. 10

VMI

(no game)

Nov. 17

Penn State

(14-34)

Nov. 24

Connecticut

(14-3)

Dec. 1

at Boston College

(38-26)

Lafayette
1961 record: Won 2, lost 6, tied 1

Sept. 22

Muhlenberg

(14-13)

Sept. 29

at Penn

(7-14)

Oct. 6

at Delaware

(0-34)

Oct. 13

Temple

(12-12)

Oct. 20

at Bucknell

(0-13)

Oct. 27

Gettysburg

(0-6)

Nov. 3

at Rutgers

(6-37)

Nov. 10

Waynesburg at Uniontown

(no game)

Nov. 17

Lehigh

(14-17)

Lehigh
1961 record: Won 7, lost 2

Sept. 22

Delaware

(6-14)

Sept. 29

at Harvard

(22-17)

Oct. 6

Gettysburg

(20-6)

Oct. 13

Bucknell

(12-7)

Oct. 20

Rutgers

(15-32)

Oct. 27

at Columbia

(14-7)

Nov. 3

at Colgate

(20-15)

Nov. 10

Kings Point

(20-6)

Nov. 17

at Lafayette

(17-14)

Maine
1961 record: Won 8, lost 0, tied 1

Sept. 22

at Massachusetts

(10-7)

Sept. 29

Rhode Island

(22-20)

Oct. 6

at Vermont

(34-14)

Oct. 13

New Hampshire

(7-6)

Oct. 20

at Connecticut

(2-0)

Oct. 27

Bates

(15-15)

Nov. 3

Colby

(14-0)

Nov. 10

at Bowdoin

(13-8)

Massachusetts
1961 record: Won 5, lost 4

Sept. 22

Maine

(7-10)

Sept. 29

at Dartmouth

(no game)

Oct. 6

at Bucknell

(no game)

Oct. 13

Connecticut

(31-13)

Oct. 20

at Rhode Island

(25-0)

Oct. 27

Boston U.

(7-21)

Nov. 3

at Vermont

(no game)

Nov. 10

at Villanova

(13-33)

Nov. 17

New Hampshire

(9-7)

Muhlenberg
1961 record: Won 2, lost 7

Sept. 22

at Lafayette

(13-14)

Sept. 29

Albright

(20-52)

Oct. 6

Temple

(12-36)

Oct. 13

at Lebanon Valley

(6-15)

Oct. 20

at Gettysburg

(8-22)

Qct. 27

Bucknell

(0-27)

Nov. 3

King's College

(no game)

Nov. 10

Franklin & Marshall

(28-6)

Nov. 17

at Moravian

(33-8)

Navy
1961 record: Won 7, lost 3

Sept. 22

at Penn State

(10-20)

Sept. 29

William & Mary

(44-6)

Oct. 6

at Minnesota

(no game)

Oct. 13

Cornell

(31-7)

Oct. 20

at Boston College

(no game)

Oct. 27

Pitt at Norfolk

(14-28)

Nov. 3

Notre Dame at Philadelphia

(13-10)

Nov. 10

at Syracuse

(no gome)

Nov. 17

at USC

(no gome)

Nov. 24

Army at Philadelphia

(13-7)

New Hampshire
1961 record: Won 3, lost 5

Sept. 29

at Colby

(no game)

Oct. 6

Rhode Island

(20-0)

Oct. 13

at Maine

(6-7)

Oct. 20

Vermont

(no game)

Oct. 27

at Northeastern

(no game)

Nov. 3

Connecticut

(23-30)

Nov. 10

Springfield

(36-13)

Nov. 17

at Massachusetts

(7-9)

Pennsylvania
1961 record: Won 2, lost 7

Sept. 29

Lafayette

(14-7)

Oct. 6

at Dartmouth

(0-30)

Oct. 13

Princeton

(3-9)

Oct. 20

Brown

(7-0)

Oct. 27

Rutgers

(6-20)

Nov. 3

at Harvard

(6-37)

Nov. 10

at Yale

(0-23)

Nov. 17

Columbia

(6-37)

Nov. 24

Cornell

(0-31)

Penn State
1961 record: Won 8, lost 3

Sept. 22

Navy

(20-10)

Sept. 29

Air Force

(no game)

Oct. 6

at Rice, N

(no game)

Oct. 13

at Army

(6-10)

Oct. 20

Syracuse

(14-0)

Oct. 27

at California

(33-16)

Nov. 3

Maryland

(17-21)

Nov. 10

West Virginia

(20-6)

Nov. 17

at Holy Cross

(34-14)

Nov. 24

at Pitt

(47-26)

Pittsburgh
1961 record: Won 3, lost 7

Sept. 15

Miami (Fla.)

(10-7)

Sept. 29

at Baylor, N

(13-16)

Oct. 6

at California

(no game)

Oct. 13

West Virginia

(6-20)

Oct. 20

UCLA

(6-20)

Oct. 27

Navy at Norfolk

(28-14)

Nov. 3

Syracuse

(9-28)

Nov. 10

at Notre Dame

(20-26)

Nov. 17

Army at New York

(no gome)

Nov. 24

Penn State

(26-47)

Princeton
1961 record: Won 5, lost 4

Sept. 29

Rutgers

(13-16)

Oct. 6

Columbia

(30-20)

Oct. 13

at Penn

(9-3)

Oct. 20

Colgate

(0-15)

Oct. 27

at Cornell

(30-25)

Nov. 3

Brown

(52-0)

Nov. 10

Harvard

(7-9)

Nov. 17

at Yale

(26-16)

Nov. 24

Dartmouth

(6-24)

Rhode Island
1961 record: Won 2, lost 6, tied 1

Sept. 22

Northeastern

(13-26)

Sept. 29

at Maine

(20-22)

Oct. 6

at New Hampshire

(0-20)

Oct. 13

Vermont

(18-6)

Oct. 20

Massachusetts

(0-25)

Oct. 27

at Brown

(12-9)

Nov. 3

at Springfield

(6-6)

Nov. 10

Hofstra

(0-12)

Nov. 17

at Connecticut

(0-37)

Rutgers
1961 record: Won 9, lost 0

Sept. 29

at Princeton

(16-13)

Oct. 6

at Connecticut

(35-12)

Oct. 13

Colgate

(26-6)

Oct. 20

at Lehigh

(32-15)

Oct. 27

at Penn

(20-6)

Nov. 3

Lafayette

(37-6)

Nov. 10

at Delaware

(27-19)

Nov. 17

Villanova

(no game)

Nov. 24

at Columbia

(32-19)

Dec. 1

Virginia

(no game)

Syracuse
1961 record: Won 8, lost 3

Sept. 22

at Oklahoma

(no game)

Sept. 29

Army at New York

(no game)

Oct. 13

Boston College

(28-13)

Oct. 20

at Penn State

(0-14)

Oct. 27

at Holy Cross

(34-6)

Nov. 3

at Pitt

(28-9)

Nov. 10

Navy

(no game)

Nov. 17

George Washington

(no game)

Nov. 24

West Virginia

(29-14)

Dec. 8

at UCLA

(no game)

Temple
1961 record: Won 2, lost 5, tied 2

Sept. 22

Kings Point, N

(0-12)

Sept. 29

Bucknell, N

(7-8)

Oct. 6

at Muhlenberg

(36-12)

Oct. 13

at Lafayette

(12-12)

Oct. 20

Buffalo, N

(3-30)

Oct. 27

at Hofstra

(14-12)

Nov. 3

Delaware, N

(0-28)

Nov. 10

at Toledo, N

(14-15)

Nov. 17

Gettysburg

(0-0)

Trinity
1961 record: Won 5, lost 2, tied 1

Sept. 29

Williams

(8-6)

Oct. 6

at St. Lawrence

(14-14)

Oct. 13

at Tufts

(14-6)

Oct. 20

at Colby

(23-16)

Oct. 27

Susquehanna

(no game)

Nov. 3

Coast Guard

(12-20)

Nov. 10

Amherst

(8-22)

Nov. 17

at Wesleyan

(42-14)

Tufts
1961 record: Won 5, lost 3

Sept. 22

Bates

(42-12)

Sept. 29

at Bowdoin

(18-0)

Oct. 6

at Colby

(16-14)

Oct. 13

Trinity

(6-14)

Oct. 27

at Williams

(14-0)

Nov. 3

at Amherst

(6-40)

Nov. 10

Northeastern

(no game)

Nov. 17

at Coast Guard

(22-8)

Vermont
1961 record: Won 3, lost 3, tied 1

Sept. 22

American Intl.

(no game)

Sept. 29

at Rensselaer

(no game)

Oct. 6

Maine

(14-34)

Oct. 13

at Rhode Island

(6-18)

Oct. 20

at New Hampshire

(no game)

Oct. 27

at Norwich

(6-6)

Nov. 3

Massachusetts

(no game)

Nov. 10

Middlebury

(6-27)

Villanova
1961 record: Won 8, lost 2

Sept. 15

West Chester

(40-13)

Sept. 22

VMI

(22-0)

Sept. 29

Boston College

(6-22)

Oct. 6

at Buffalo

(28-6)

Oct. 20

at Delaware

(no game)

Oct. 27

Xavier (O.)

(no game)

Nov. 3

Detroit

(6-20)

Nov. 10

Massachusetts

(33-13)

Nov. 17

at Rutgers

(no game)

Wesleyan
1961 record: Won 1, lost 7

Sept. 29

at Middlebury

(14-20)

Oct. 6

Bowdoin

(0-27)

Oct. 13

at Coast Guard

(9-13)

Oct. 20

Worcester Tech

(20-21)

Oct. 27

Amherst

(8-48)

Nov. 3

at Hamilton

(21-20)

Nov. 10

at Williams

(0-14)

Nov. 17

Trinity

(14-42)

Williams
1961 record: Won 6, lost 2

Sept. 29

at Trinity

(6-8)

Oct. 6

Springfield

(18-7)

Oct. 13

Middlebury

(12-0)

Oct. 20

at Bowdoin

(9-3)

Oct. 27

Tufts

(0-14)

Nov. 3

at Union

(22-0)

Nov. 10

Wesleyan

(14-0)

Nov. 17

at Amherst

(12-0)

Yale
1961 record: Won 4, lost 5

Sept. 29

Connecticut

(18-0)

Oct. 6

at Brown

(14-3)

Oct. 13

at Columbia

(0-11)

Oct. 20

Cornell

(12-0)

Oct. 27

Colgate

(8-14)

Nov. 3

Dartmouth

(8-24)

Nov. 10

Penn

(23-0)

Nov. 17

Princeton

(16-26)

Nov. 24

at Harvard

(0-27)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)