Search

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Oct. 01, 1962
Oct. 01, 1962

Table of Contents
Oct. 1, 1962

The Series
Golf
Jack Price
America's Cup
  • At the precise moment shown at left, the Australian sloop "Gretel" swept past the U.S.'s "Weatherly" on the last leg of the second race to become the first America's Cup challenger in 28 years to win a single event in the best-of-seven series. The Aussies' victory evened the score at one all; on the following pages Carleton Mitchell analyzes the factors that gave new suspense to the century-old cup competition.

Harness Racing
College Football
  • By Gwilym S. Brown

    It has often been claimed, and statistics tend to prove it, that in college football the Western Conference is supreme. Returns from key games last week indicate the pattern will hold up again this fall

Pro Football
Motor Sports
Sporting Look
Baseball's Week
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

SPLIT AND POLISH
Sirs:
After learning of golf purse-splitting (The Big Golf Secret, Sept. 24), may I suggest a similar deal between Ford and Drysdale, Hornung and Gifford or even Carry Back and Kelso?
J. S. SWEENY
Baltimore

This is an article from the Oct. 1, 1962 issue Original Layout

Sirs:
What foolishness! Spectators know pros are pros because they are good putters; they also know the hazards of the greens—the grass, the slope and the breeze. When players have earned a tie over the hazards of 72 greens it is absurd to settle big stakes over a putt or two—which in a great many cases would be equivalent to the roll of the dice. Only a poor spectator would feel cheated if the tying players did not gamble for big stakes over a hole or two.

It should be made official: split the pot and play off for the honor.
HARRY H. MICHAEL JR.
Lansdowne, Pa.

TYING COBB
Sirs:
Maury Wills is good at stealing bases, no doubt of it (BASEBALL'S WEEK, Sept. 17 & 24). But when comparisons are made between his record and the marks of such others as Carey and Cobb, be sure to emphasize one tremendous difference:

In the old days the runner received credit for a stolen base only when the play was clean. If the catcher, for instance, dropped or mishandled the ball the base was not officially stolen, even though the runner had such a jump that he would have made the base anyway. Cobb had the defense so jittery that catchers and infielders often fouled up the play.

Today the base is officially stolen no matter how well or ill the ball is handled. The runner can fall fiat on his face and crawl the last 30 feet while the catcher chases the ball to the backstop or throws it into center field, and still the runner is credited with a stolen base so long as he makes the bag.

Under modern rules, no one knows how many bases Cobb would have stolen.
FRANCIS P. GRADY
Valley Stream, N.Y.

Sirs:
At this time last season Commissioner of Baseball Ford Frick announced that Roger Maris, a home run hitter of some reputation, could not break Babe Ruth's record of 60 home runs in one season unless he did so in 154 games.

I have not seen or heard any comment from the commissioner's office concerning the present situation of Maury Wills. Am I right to expect, however, that, should Wills break the record in more than 154 games, an asterisk will be duly placed by his name?
JACK ARMISTEAD
Boone, N.C.

•According to Frick, Wills will not be credited with breaking-Cobb's record this year, since by the end of the Dodgers' 154th game he had stolen only 95 bases. Now that he has topped 96 for the longer season, his record will be listed, not with an asterisk, but separately.—ED.

Sirs:
What do the defenders of the past say about Wills? Lively shoes?
HAL MILLER
Colorado Springs, Colo.

BEER AND MUSCLES
Sirs:
I have studied the standards of physical development recommended by Bud Wilkinson and his staff, especially the standard of 14 sit-ups for 17-year-olds (The Vigor We Need, July 16). I'd like to tell you that at our summer camp in the Sequoia National Forest I saw an 11-year-old boy do 500 sit-ups and a 17-year-old boy do 1,000 sit-ups. The older boy was planning to go to 2,000 the following day, but the camp director set 1,000 as a limit.

It is rewarding to see the response of our young people when they are provided with the opportunity and the facilities for physical development. Given leadership and challenging standards, they can better most currently accepted standards for fitness.
HOMER F. BARNES
Santa Barbara, Calif.

Sirs:
Pray tell me, what chance does the Kennedy program have to succeed when breweries do away with most of our weekend exercise by making their cans so easy to open that no exertion need be expended?
LLOYD LARSON
Kelseyville, Calif.

PRESENT INDICATIVE
Sirs:
Congratulations for the excellent survey of the NFL and AFL (Pro Football 1962, Sept. 10). Someday we will watch the World Series of football between the pros, and I hope Mr. George Halas is still around, for then he will know the AFL is here to stay.
CHARLES F. SCHREINER
Mercer Island, Wash.

Sirs:
It does not matter who wins in the East, because the Packers will win the championship anyhow!
STEVE BROWN
Bellingham, Wash.

Sirs:
Hornung the best back! Hah, he's in a class with my mother.
THEODORE WESTBROOK
Syracuse, N.Y.

Sirs:
With such greats as Abner Haynes, Jack Spikes and Cotton Davidson, the Dallas Texans will take over first place from the San Diego Chargers.
BILL ROBERTSON
Artesia, N. Mex.

Sirs:
Concerning the NFL-AFL teams, I congratulate you for your wise choices. Except—you stated that "the most striking change in the Denver Broncos is sartorial." Now that our Broncos have soundly beaten "powerhouse" San Diego by nearly two yards to one in a 30-21 humiliation, we citizens are considering sending the Broncos' old vertically striped socks to the Chargers, in the hope that they will continue with the socks' losing tradition.
JACK M. HUNTER
Littleton, Colo.

Sirs:
Your prediction that Buffalo "looks good enough to finish third in the East" is the most asinine ever. The Bills have great rookie talent defensively, with veterans like Al Dorow, Cookie Gilchrist and Wayne Crow and, with the pass catching of Glen Bass and Ernie Warlick on offense, we don't see how they can miss being a contender for first.
IRWIN T. MESCH
EARL S. CARREL
Buffalo

Sirs:
Why did you criticize our Cowboys and laud the Texans? Anybody knows the Cowboys could stomp the Texans. Who wrote the football previews anyway? Louella Parsons or Bo Belinsky?
STEVE FOSTER
Dallas

PAST PERFECT
Sirs:
It amazes me that Alfred Wright could leave Johnny Lujack off his list of candidates (The Best College Player of All Time, Sept. 24). Lujack played at a time when college competition in general and Notre Dame in particular were at their peak. Not only was Lujack one of the top all-round players of all time, he was the very finest college T-formation quarterback and passer in the history of the game, was a master field general and tactician (a qualification Mr. Wright seems to overlook) and could handle a football like a sleight-of-hand artist. He was also a top pass defender and terrific tackier (check the films of the 1946 Army-Notre Dame 0-0 tie). By the way, Lujack was quite a runner too.
JOHN KENLINE
Wilmette, Ill.

VULNERABLE SCORE
Sirs:
I was both amazed and awed by the fantastic 13-spade bridge hand of Jules Wright (FOR THE RECORD, Sept. 17). However, I do not understand his scoring of the hand. He gave himself 3,280 points, but I believe he deserved only 3,240:

View this article in the original magazine

Had the bid been seven no trump his scoring would have been a perfect 3,280. The one difficulty would have been that he could not have taken a trick!
THOMAS C. HUDNUT
Rochester

•Correct.—ED.

BROWN TASTE
Sirs:
Paul Brown states that he "plays this game to win" (A Man for This Season, Sept. 10). Must we be so forgiving and forgetful that this person who is being so highly praised is the same person who was responsible for the most discolored moment ever to take place on a pro football field?

I am referring to the last minute of that game played late last year between the Giants and the Browns at Yankee Stadium. The Browns, under orders from Mr. Brown, committed the cardinal sin of all athletic contests. They failed to show a will to win and emerge victorious. By not trying to advance the ball to gain a field goal or even a possible scoring position, the Browns conceded the 7-7 game and the title to the Giants. For the Browns a tie had no bearing on their final league standings since they already knew that the Eagles had won earlier in the day and had taken second place—with an outside chance of a first-place tie on a Brown win.
MARK L. BOROWSKY
Philadelphia

Sirs:
Congratulations for a fine article about a real perfectionist and gentleman.
W. F. CAMACHO JR.
Lowell, Mass.

MIXED TWOSOME
Sirs:
My daughter phoned me to look at your article on Pinehurst (The Southern Resort of a Proper Bostonian, Sept. 10), and to my surprise I saw a picture of my wife taken in a "Monkey" tournament at Pinehurst in 1905. She is the lady in white at the right of the lady about to play, and she is holding a club in her right hand (see above). She was Mary C. Dutton at that time and was the North and South champion that year, 1905.

We were married in 1907, and if the good Lord spares us until Nov. 7 of this year we will celebrate our 55th anniversary. She does not play golf now, as years ago she broke her ankle and now arthritis has settled in that joint and it bothers her to walk too much. However, with me, nine holes a day is still a must. My eyes are not too good at 80, having had two operations for glaucoma; but last year I broke 40 twice.
ALLAN P. CHASE
Kennebunk, Me.

PHOTOEARLY NORTH AND SOUTH CHAMPION

7 spades redoubled

840

Making contract

50

Grand slam vulnerable

1,500

Honors in spades

150

Rubber

700

3,240