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THE CHALLENGE AND RISK IN BEING A CHAMPION

Dec. 24, 1962
Dec. 24, 1962

Table of Contents
Dec. 24, 1962

Point Of Fact
Yesterday
Lusitania
  • When a U-boat sank the 'Lusitania' in 1915 the Allies denounced Germany for the murder of an unarmed vessel. But the question still persists: Was she truly defenseless? An American explorer, John Light, has tried to find out. Recently Kenneth MacLeish, son of Poet-Playwright Archibald MacLeish and an accomplished scuba diver, went down to search the wreck with Light. Here is him report

Persian Hunt
Non-Organization
  • There are a few grown-ups around who remember living a not-so-organized childhood—one in which they were in charge of a good deal of their time. There is little evidence that the boys (or girls) suffered thereby. On the contrary, what they did with their time and a few old boards and wheels was, as the concoctions here show, often pure genius and always fun. It still can be

College Football
Pro Football
Basketball
Frank Merriwell
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Acknowledgments

THE CHALLENGE AND RISK IN BEING A CHAMPION

Though adventuring hobbyists are a wonderful part of the nationwide participation in sport, it is the champions, like Hydroplane Racer Bill Muncey (shown right) and Cathy Nagel (see cover), youngest skier ever to vein a national title, who provide the flamboyant climaxes. As their reward, the champions receive applause or money-Yet they risk not only injury but also the possibility of becoming, very publicly, bumbling—and thoroughly booed—losers.

This is an article from the Dec. 24, 1962 issue

His strained features masked by goggles, Bill Muncey typifies a champion's ceaseless search for victory. In past three yeans, he has won 13 (out of 18) unlimited class races

Head up and eyes on the track ahead, Jockey Bill Hartack bursts out of the starting gate at Del Mar with the controlled daring that has become his racing trademark

TWO PHOTOSMARK KAUFFMAN