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Plays are the thing in the major bowls

Dec. 24, 1962
Dec. 24, 1962

Table of Contents
Dec. 24, 1962

Point Of Fact
Yesterday
Lusitania
  • When a U-boat sank the 'Lusitania' in 1915 the Allies denounced Germany for the murder of an unarmed vessel. But the question still persists: Was she truly defenseless? An American explorer, John Light, has tried to find out. Recently Kenneth MacLeish, son of Poet-Playwright Archibald MacLeish and an accomplished scuba diver, went down to search the wreck with Light. Here is him report

Persian Hunt
Non-Organization
  • There are a few grown-ups around who remember living a not-so-organized childhood—one in which they were in charge of a good deal of their time. There is little evidence that the boys (or girls) suffered thereby. On the contrary, what they did with their time and a few old boards and wheels was, as the concoctions here show, often pure genius and always fun. It still can be

College Football
Pro Football
Basketball
Frank Merriwell
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Acknowledgments

Plays are the thing in the major bowls

With nine of the 10 top-ranked teams in the U.S. pitted against one another, only the schools with truly brilliant offenses can expect to win this year

The five major bowl games, which will feature all but one of the nation's leading college teams, will be watched by 130 million TV viewers and over 300,000 paid spectators in the four days from December 29 to January 1. Because all of the teams have tight defensive systems, the dazzling play will be at a premium. The University of Southern California has one of the best—an intriguing pass option maneuver (see top right) that will bear watching in its Rose Bowl game against Wisconsin. And Penn State, which meets Florida in the Gator Bowl on December 29, is certain to spring its nifty "bread and butter reverse," which has helped the favored Lions unroll a mighty offense late in the season. For scouting reports of major bowls, turn the page.

This is an article from the Dec. 24, 1962 issue Original Layout

ROSE BOWL
USC OVER WISCONSIN

This is the first bowl game in which the nation's No. 1-ranked team has ever met the nation's No. 2-ranked team. It is also the first time that teams from Wisconsin and California have faced one another for the championship of anything. No fans are louder than those from Wisconsin save those from California; only one state is better at rooting home a front-runner than California—Wisconsin. Although Wisconsin is considered a slight favorite, USC probably will win. Big Ten teams have won 13 of 16 games in the current Rose Bowl series and Wisconsin has accounted for two of those three defeats. This Wisconsin team, however, is good—a true Big Ten champion with heft and depth, and USC will have to fight hard to beat it. Quarterback Ron VanderKelen (24) is both an excellent passer and an excellent runner and only 2.7% of his passes were intercepted all season. His main target is All-America End Pat Richter (88), 6 feet 5½ inches, 220 pounds. Coach John McKay has built an imaginative offense and a strong defense at USC. His current USC team is the first undefeated one since 1932, and in its three big games—against Iowa, Washington and Notre Dame—it held the opposition to no points. Quarterbacks Pete Beathard (12) and Bill Nelsen (16) call a good running game, and Pass Catcher Hal Bedsole (19) is almost as good as Richter. USC's wide running threat is Willie (The Wisp) Brown (26).

Other players to watch and what to watch for: Wisconsin uses a basic pro-type offense with flankers, fashioned along the lines of the Green Bay Packers. Halfback Gary Kroner (16) plays on both offense and defense and hit with 27 of 27 conversion attempts. Bruhn often plays a predominantly sophomore backfield led by Quarterback Harold Brandt (18), Halfbacks Carl Silvestri (45) and Frederic Reichardt (48), and sophomores will, of course, be sophomores. Defensively, Ends Ron Carlson (28) and Larry Howard (81) are better than adequate but, overall, Wisconsin is not strong against flat passes. USC's Ken Del Conte (20), a journeyman ballcarrier, is an excellent blocker, and Ben Wilson (49) is strong at fullback. USC had only three passes intercepted all year. The team seems to direct its opening sequence at the bulwark of an opponent's line and once that sector is intimidated, branches out, testing one side and then the other, then usually throws deep to Bedsole. The strategy should win for USC.

SUGAR BOWL
ARKANSAS OVER MISSISSIPPI

Both Arkansas and Mississippi are in full agreement that they met in football in 1914 and at Little Rock. Mississippi maintains that it won 13-7, Arkansas says it won 1-0 by forfeit. Small matter, for such things can be expected from these old and hating rivals. In their 25 meetings Arkansas has won 13, Mississippi 12; nine of those games were decided by six points or less; Ole Miss has scored 310 points, Arkansas 303. Mississippi has won the last four games the schools have played, but in this meeting, their first bowl game, Arkansas has a good chance to upset Mississippi. This Arkansas team (9-1) is probably the best in the school's history, and Coach Frank Broyles was recently rewarded with a $3,000 pay raise (to $23,000 per year). "By using the three-platoon system this year for the first time," he says, "I had more boys ready to play than ever before—boys who do their talking with their helmets on." The Razorbacks use a tight slot T and the offense is basically a quarterback-fullback operation. Quarterback Billy Moore (10) and Fullback Danny Brabham (31) are the leaders of this offense and, according to Broyles, "We like to take the bail and run right down the other team's throat." Arkansas also has good field-goal potential in sophomore Tommy McKnelly (52), who has hit from as far out as 41 yards and who won the SMU game with a kick of 24 yards. Mississippi Coach Johnny Vaught relies heavily on defense, but in the last three seasons he has moved from ball possession to a wide-open offense. This year he has introduced some elements of the single wing into his slotback and wingback system but, as always, he will rely heavily on the man in motion and the option pass. Vaught has a fine quarterback in Glynn Griffing (15), who completed 59% of his passes, but still does not have an adequate fullback.

Other players to watch and what to watch for: Arkansas' young defensive secondary has difficulty defending against the short, down-and-out pass. The Razorbacks have superb downfield blocking, and Tailback Jesse Branch (21) will be used mostly as an inside runner but also has enough speed to swing outside. Moore cuts so sharply that on a wet field he loses his effectiveness. Mississippi is strongest against running, yielding only 67.8 yards per game, but almost equally good against passing, giving up 74.4 per game. Ole Miss ability to strike from distances has minimized its weakness at fullback. In a mild upset, Arkansas.

ORANGE BOWL
OKLAHOMA OVER ALABAMA

Bud Wilkinson has sent four Oklahoma teams to Miami's Orange Bowl since 1954; each has won and only one ever dared get itself even momentarily behind. While Miami has certainly been good to Oklahoma, Oklahoma has been even better to Miami. The Sooners have drawn an average of 74,000 to the Orange Bowl, even though the Orange is not the most watched of the televised bowl games (in 1962 19.3 million watched the Orange Bowl compared to 37.8 million for the Rose Bowl).

Oklahoma and Alabama have never met before in football, either in a bowl or a bathtub. Oklahoma's strong point is its ground game; Alabama's strong point is stopping a ground game. Somehow, somewhere, something's got to give, and Alabama—although a slight favorite—probably is that something. After losing two of its first three games, Oklahoma pounded its next seven opponents 247-19, and during that period it developed a sound passing attack, which was seldom used by previous Wilkinson-coached teams. Alabama showed some leaks in its "umbrella" pass defense.

Monte Deere (12), Oklahoma's quarterback, is a good passer but the Sooners have no capable replacement for him and the possibility always exists that while he runs the wing T offense—and he runs it quite a bit—he might be injured. Accurate though he is, Deere still likes to call running plays, sending Fullback Jim Grisham (45) straight ahead and Halfback Joe Don Looney (33) on slants.

Bear Bryant's Alabama team has stood fast for 24 games without allowing an opponent more than one touchdown. Linebacker Lee Roy Jordan (70) is probably the most valuable player on the team, although Slotman Joe Namath (12) has been getting more of the attention. Namath has completed 52% of his passes and commands the offense, which, in Bryant tradition, utilizes the man in motion on almost every play.

Other players to watch and what to watch for: Look for Oklahoma Wingback Virgil Boll (39) to get the ball on reverse plays. Deere will try to hustle Alabama off side with long counts and check-offs at the line of scrimmage. Alabama's Namath might not be as free to throw as he was late in the season if his team gets behind. Don't be surprised if Bryant reverts to his old self inside Alabama's 20. But whatever he does, it is not likely to be enough.

COTTON BOWL
LSU OVER TEXAS

Neither Coach Chuck McClendon at Louisiana State nor Darrell Royal at Texas believes that the passing game is here to stay in college football and thus the Cotton Bowl becomes a game of one strong defense against another. LSU gave up an average of 3.4 points per game during the season. Texas, by comparison, was munificent, giving up an average of 5.9, and thus a well-planned safety might win this game. "We must be," says Royal, "the most criticized undefeated team in history," and that criticism came because Texas has often been a dud offensively. Royal relies on running and kicking but lacks a breakaway runner. There is a certain indecisiveness surrounding the Texas quarterback situation and Royal may use three: Johnny Genung (14), Duke Carlisle (11) and Tommy Wade (17). Wade is the best passer of the three and the only one whom Royal will allow to pass in his own end of the field. LSU uses a slot T offense with the halfback flanker cutting back to the line of scrimmage. The big problem with LSU's passing has been the receivers—they drop too many. Defensively LSU has not given up a touchdown by running in its last 16 games (it gave up four TDs this year on passes). LSU is willing to give up the short pass and make the tackle instantly. When the Tigers are near their goal, however, they step in and stop the short pass. Jerry Stovall (21) is a powerful halfback with good running balance and is regarded as a better goal-line runner than Billy Cannon. Stovall is also LSU's best pass catcher, a fine punter (37-yard average), a good defensive back and fine at returning kickoffs (41.6-yard average). Lynn Amedee (11) is the quarterback and also the field-goal and conversion kicker. He made five of eight field-goal attempts and 18 of 20 conversions.

Other players to watch and what to watch for: Texas has the best pair of linebackers in college ball in Johnny Treadwell (60) and Pat Culpepper (31). Texas quarterbacks will sprint out instead of passing from the pocket, and they will bring the ball down and run with it instead of gambling with a pass to a partially covered receiver. Texas uses an eight-man front and is deft at stopping traps. Fullback Ray Poage (33) has been bothered all year by injuries but is still good for short gains. LSU can be stung by the pass. The key defensive linemen are Tackle Fred Miller (78) and Center Dennis Gaubatz (53). Miller is excellent at rushing the passer. LSU should win.

PHOTOBOLD PENN STATE COACH RIP ENGLE SHOULD WIN HANDILYDIAGRAMPENN STATE SCISSORS, play 42, is one of prettiest, most effective running plays in football. Coach Rip Engle got it from Harvard's Dick Harlow in 1947, says it has averaged 6.8 yards a try in last 13 years. Quarterback reverse pivots, rides with fullback into line as left half flies to right, faking for outside pitch. Right half stays low, then takes ball and looks for running room through guard or tackle, where defenders are either trapped or pass-blocked.
E
T
G
C
G
T
E
Q
LH
FB
RH
DIAGRAMSOUTHERN CAL'S OPTION PASS, considered by rival scouts the toughest Trojan play to defend against, was consistent gainer during season, principally because of the superb pass-catching abilities of Left End Hal Bedsole. Called GEE-179-X-OUT AND UP (these are the words Quarterback Pete Beathard speaks in huddle), the play begins with Halfback Willie Brown split wide to right, Ken Del Conte at left half. Beathard pivots, fakes to Fullback Ben Wilson going up the middle. Beathard can continue running or, more likely, pass to Bedsole, who goes directly at the defensive halfback. If the defender drops off, Bedsole will stop and take short pass; if he plays tight, Bedsole will cut up field for long pass that may go for touchdown.
E
T
G
C
G
T
E
Q
LH
FB
RH
PHOTOUSC'S McKAY RETURNS GLORY TO WESTPHOTOARKANSAS' BROYLES: REVENGEPHOTOSOONERS' WILKINSON: MR. FIVE FOR FIVEPHOTOLSU'S McCLENDON SHOULD HAVE A WIN