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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Dec. 24, 1962
Dec. 24, 1962

Table of Contents
Dec. 24, 1962

Point Of Fact
Yesterday
Lusitania
  • When a U-boat sank the 'Lusitania' in 1915 the Allies denounced Germany for the murder of an unarmed vessel. But the question still persists: Was she truly defenseless? An American explorer, John Light, has tried to find out. Recently Kenneth MacLeish, son of Poet-Playwright Archibald MacLeish and an accomplished scuba diver, went down to search the wreck with Light. Here is him report

Persian Hunt
Non-Organization
  • There are a few grown-ups around who remember living a not-so-organized childhood—one in which they were in charge of a good deal of their time. There is little evidence that the boys (or girls) suffered thereby. On the contrary, what they did with their time and a few old boards and wheels was, as the concoctions here show, often pure genius and always fun. It still can be

College Football
Pro Football
Basketball
Frank Merriwell
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Acknowledgments

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

CORPSMEN
Sirs:
I was delighted to see Gilbert Rogin's excellent article on Tom Rosandich (Wanted: 32 Guys for the Boondocks, Dec. 10). For three years, when I was overseas with the U.S. Information Agency, I was privileged to observe, firsthand, what Rosandich did for the people of Southeast Asia—and for the U.S. image there.

This is an article from the Dec. 24, 1962 issue

I'm glad that many others can now glimpse Rosandich's extraordinary personality and his admirable work.
JAMES A. ELLIOT
Washington

Sirs:
This June I graduate from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. My wife and I have felt that we would like to spend two years performing activities similar to those pursued by Mr. Rosandich prior to a career in business. My background includes five years of coaching and setting up athletic programs.

I would appreciate it if you could tell us how we can learn about such a program.
BOOTH GARDNER
Watertown, Mass.

•Write to Jules Pagano, Peace Corps, Washington 25, D.C.—ED.

ONE-MAN SHOW
Sirs:
Roy Terrell didn't smear the pages of your magazine with tears over the hardships of Arthur Heyman (Leading the Rout of the Tall Men, Dec. 10) the way Ray Cave did two years ago. But Terrell doesn't really know what he is writing about when he implies that the much-persecuted star is a turn-the-other-cheek Janus. Ignoring the obvious exaggeration of your statement that a UNC freshman ran "halfway across the court" (the two had been guarding each other for the entire game) to slug Arthur, we were surprised at your inaccuracies and omissions in retelling the much-told story of the February '61 battle of Duke gym.

However, it is not because of his fights, nor because of his All-America standing, nor even because of his backing down from a commitment to attend UNC that Heyman is booed in Chapel Hill. He is booed because of incidents such as the one near the end of the UNC-Duke game at Chapel Hill last year. When Charlie Shaffer, a UNC sophomore who had been guarding Heyman, fouled out, Duke's Jeff Mullins started to go over to shake hands with him. Before Mullins could reach Shaffer, Heyman firmly grabbed his teammate by the arm and stopped him. The two never shook hands.

Heyman is fortunate that he decided not to come to the University of North Carolina, where a man is judged by more than his ability to score points in a basketball game. He wouldn't have lasted very long.
CURRY KIRKPATRICK
HARRY W. LLOYD
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Sirs:
I was present that night when Art scored 39 points in the game with South Carolina, and it was evident that South Carolina knew what was to be done if they were to win the game. After three minutes and 25 seconds, the score was South Carolina 11 and Duke 1. It was undoubtedly the roughest going-over that Duke had ever had, but they did manage to hang on. With 12 minutes left in the game and the score tied, something broke loose. Specifically, Art Heyman. With just this interim remaining, he scored 26 points. More amazing, he played every position on the court, completely baffling his opposition with agility and seemingly effortless finesse. Moreover, while he completed a large number of shots, he recovered far better than 50% of the shots he missed and either followed them up with another shot or passed off to a teammate, thus dominating the rebounding and shooting simultaneously.

Besides producing mass consternation in the South Carolina stands, he also produced the greatest one-man show ever seen by a South Carolina student body.
PETER C. XIQUES
Columbia, S.C.

ROOM AT THE TOP
Sirs:
What's happened to college basketball (The Top 20 Teams, Dec. 10)? Are there only 20 teams in the country that play a major schedule? Granted that these clubs will receive most of the publicity in the coming season, how about giving due recognition to some of the over 200 teams across the nation that strive just as hard to win, making the sport a competitive one?
PHILIP S. CARNEY
El Cajon, Calif.

Sirs:
How could you forget Providence College? At the beginning of last year's season you rated P.C. No. 1 in the East and the best of the Independents.
ALAN WEINER
Pawtucket, R.I.

Sirs:
How could you not include the University of Wisconsin?
FRED GOSMAN
Milwaukee

Sirs:
Drake has a 35-15 record in the last two years under Coach Maurice John in the nation's finest basketball conference.
ROBERT H. SPIEGEL
Des Moines

Sirs:
Colorado has virtually the same team that went to the quarter-finals of the NCAA last year, and has possibly the best basketball player in America in Ken Charlton.
JOHN D. STEPHENSON
Greeley, Colo.

BAREFOOT
Sirs:
The roadrunners that live next door to me (in a split-level saltbush) think that this week's SCORECARD (Dec. 10) is the best ever. They are anxious to buy several pairs of those running shoes, illustrated on page 13.

At this mile-high altitude the nights are very cold, so they have to stand on the edge of my chimney in the morning poking each bare tootsie in turn into the warm updraft, whining "rhree-ee-ee." Conversely, the pavement at noon is very hot; this is why they move so fast.

If you can locate the manufacturer of those shoes and send several pair we would have two very grateful geococcyx (Latin for "barefoot bird with chick of tan"). They would be willing to carry a sign "Shoes by I. Miller," or if you want a straight cash deal they'll send 50 skins. These neighbors of mine are hard-working, upward mobile types with an income of about 16,000 lizards a year.
ARCH NAPIER
Albuquerque