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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Jan. 21, 1963
Jan. 21, 1963

Table of Contents
Jan. 21, 1963

Point Of Fact
Yesterday
Banzai
A Season For Discovery
Basketball
Fitness
Murchison
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

THE SPORTSMEN
Sirs:
Your Sportsman of the Year article (Jan. 7) was a very appealingly human account of the more pertinent points of interest about Terry Baker. I enjoyed this more than any of the numerous stories about Terry I have read this year.

This is an article from the Jan. 21, 1963 issue Original Layout

Author Wright did not endeavor to equate him with a Greek god, as has been the tendency here in the Pacific Northwest. Rather, the author recognized that overdone superlatives were not necessary, as this scholar-athlete's achievements speak for themselves.

A reader is likely to be even more inclined to wish for a chance to talk to Terry than to watch him perform.
HOLT WILLIAMS
Salem, Ore.

Sirs:
Thank you for such a wonderful article. I agree that the future of Terry Baker "is full of exciting promise."
EARLE E. JACOBS III
Hamden, Conn.

Sirs:
Your choice of Baker is absurd. No matter how brilliant the feats of a college athlete, he can never be compared to the professional or amateur sportsman who is meeting the best in the world in his field. Baker was playing against mediocre football players, most of whom will never be heard of again. To rate Baker, for all his prowess, above such accomplished athletes as Arnold Palmer, Valeri Brumel, Murray Rose, Peter Snell, Emile Griffith, Jim Taylor and Maury Wills—to name just a few—is without doubt the laugh of the year.
RON SHRIVELL
San Francisco

Sirs:
Terry Baker is indeed a fine athlete and a credit to the sports world, but 1962 belonged to Sonny Liston.
PETER A. MOUND
New York City

Sirs:
There is no question in anyone's mind of the fact that Terry Baker of Oregon State is deserving of the fine tribute paid to him in your Sportsman of the Year award. However, I cannot agree with your statement that he is "the first college football player in all the years of the game to be so unanimously decorated." Is it possible that in four short years you could have forgotten the Heisman Trophy winner, All-America halfback and scholar from the United States Military Academy, Peter Dawkins?
LARRY PATTERSON
Cincinnati

Sirs:
"The first college player to be so decorated"? What about Baker's physical and spiritual twin, Pete Dawkins, Army '59?
PETER BRENT
New York City

•Like Terry Baker, Army's outstanding scholar-athlete Pete Dawkins won both the Heisman and Maxwell awards and was named to most of the major All-America teams. However, Dawkins' year of glory was 1958, when LSU's Billy Cannon stole some of the show as leading candidate for player of the year honors.—ED.

Sirs:
What must Stan Musial do to merit mention in your magazine? In recent years he has broken scores of league records, and I am unaware of any feature article you've devoted to him.
BILL BLACKBURN
St. Louis

•Stan the Man was Sportsman of the Year 1957.—ED.

HEAVY STOVE LEAGUE
Sirs:
Dolly Connelly's article on Joe Morovits had a familiar ring (Real-life Bunyan, Jan. 7). There is a fairly well-accepted legend on the Olympic Peninsula of the Iron Man of the Hoh. When asked by those he met on the trail up the Hoh River if the stove he was carrying wasn't heavy, the Iron Man replied, "It wouldn't be so bad if it weren't for that 50-pound sack of flour shifting around inside." Is there some connection?
ROBERT L. KABEL
Hawthorne, Calif.

•The Iron Man of the Hoh, another mighty mountain man, was a Dutch homesteader named John Huelsdonk who made his way into the Olympic Peninsula wilderness shortly before the turn of the century and hacked a farm out of the rain forest. Huelsdonk was better known than Morovits. He was not a loner and his place was far more accessible to outsiders than Mighty Joe's. In fact, Huelsdonk's children and young grandchildren still live in the same area along the upper Hoh River.—ED.

RESPONSE
Sirs:
Tom Rosandich (Wanted! 32 Guys for the Boondocks, Dec. 10) has made a great impression on everyone who has met him. Thus far his recruiting efforts have been excellent, with responses from 60 topflight athletes, including two members of the Wisconsin Rose Bowl team.

A large part of this success, we feel, was possible because of your excellent article. Your story captured the challenge of the program we are undertaking in Indonesia, and acted as an "advance notice" of Tom's arrival at various campuses. Responses from the article itself are just beginning to come in, and will help not only the Indonesian program but also physical education programs for other countries.

Many thanks again for your help.
ROBERT SARGENT SHRIVER JR.
Director, Peace Corps
Washington

SONNY FUTURE
Sirs:
It would seem that Jack Nilon has some excellent ideas for Sonny Liston in particular and boxing in general (A Busy Time for Sonny Liston, Jan. 7). Having Liston fight two or three times a year will do much to help revive a sport that has been suffering from the infrequency of big title fights. Putting the championship bouts on home TV is equally great.

I would like to voice agreement with Nilon's contention that Sonny is best of all the heavyweights and will be around for at least the next five or six years.
CHARLES L. MUSSMAN
New Haven, Conn.

Sirs:
Shakespeare might well be speaking for Sonny Liston in a truly eloquent manner, as Sonny looks down to the canvas at an unconcious Spartan, Cassius Clay:

For ever, and for ever, farewell, Cassius!
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile;
If not, why then this parting was well made.
JAMES E. THOMPSON JR.
Palos Verdes Estates, Calif.

Sirs:
I agree that Patterson should have a chance to get his title back but what about the No. 1 man behind Liston? I think he should either have a chance at the title or Patterson should eliminate him before he gets a match with Liston. Why let two guys fight three times to get all the gravy? If Patterson wins, it means another go for Liston later on, so the man now first on the list will get old and gray before he gets a chance at the title.
A. C. LAKE
Oklahoma City

CATS AND KITTENS
Sirs:
You have finally chosen the right team for the No. 1 spot in college basketball, the University of Cincinnati Bearcats. They are a fabulous team and all Cincinnatians are justly proud of them and the finest basketball coach in the land, bar none, Ed Jucker.

After seeing the freshman team, the Bear-kittens, in action, I think we have all the talent needed to keep that NCAA championship trophy right here where it is for the next three seasons.
RONALD PIERCE
Cincinnati

Sirs:
Penn has now defeated five teams that are ranked by the wire services: St. Joseph's, Vanderbilt, Boston College, Duquesne and Princeton, losing only to Illinois. Don't we deserve mention?
ED FABRICIUS
Philadelphia

Sirs:
In BASKETBALL'S WEEK (Jan. 14) you gave Georgia Tech the usual billing. After the Tech team held Cotton Nash to just nine points, four of which were foul shots, your writer practically ignored the Tech victory over sixth-ranked Kentucky. Tech is now undefeated in 11 games and is one of the three undefeated teams in the nation.
BRENT BLACK
Atlanta

CHESS VS. FOOTBALL
Sirs:
It is hard to relate how irritated I was by the letter in your 19TH HOLE (Jan. 7) written by one R. McCutcheon. While it is a fairly reasonable assertion that boxing and football do not contain everything "unclean, unfair and dishonest," it is also true that far more intelligent means of exercise have been devised.

His rather sarcastic remark about chess was also totally inexcusable. Just because he doesn't have the perspicacity to play, it is hardly a reason to make such an imbecilic comment, even as sarcasm.

Finally, I would like to say that basketball, baseball and especially track and field do as much for the person and, indeed, more than getting a broken leg in football ever did. While I may need to "consult the nearest psychiatrist," I rather believe Mr. McCutcheon is beyond help by anyone.
GLENN BOSSMEYER
Louisville