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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Jan. 28, 1963
Jan. 28, 1963

Table of Contents
Jan. 28, 1963

Stylish Dash
High Voltage
  • By Arlie W. Schardt

    Some of the liveliest action in the current hockey season has been provided by the Detroit Red Wings, thanks to a short-circuiting live wire who crackles on the ice like a bolt of winter lightning

Sporting Look
  • The word was handed down last summer. Wimbledon's old guard had had enough tampering with sacred tradition. No more 18-karat-gold briefs or shocking-pink panties on the courts, they said—all white is the rule. Good idea, said fashion—and not only on center courts but in southern resort centers everywhere white is right

Fishing
Boxing
Bing's Clambake
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Departments

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

SPELLBOUND
Sirs:
After reading Roy Terrell's delightful article about cruising in the Grenadines (Six Characters in Search of Summer, Jan. 21), I seriously question the author's sanity. Why would any man in his right mind ever want to return to New York City's 9-to-5 world after such a trip? If you value Terrell's services I suggest you keep an eye on him.

This is an article from the Jan. 28, 1963 issue Original Layout

As I read the article, riding on Lexington Avenue's underground answer to the Eleuthera, I looked up and noticed my stop. Undismayed, I continued on a northerly tack four stops past my own. After another 15¢ fare, I returned to my stop and walked the usual three blocks, but I didn't notice the cold and wind nearly as much. Many thanks to Roy Terrell for such enjoyable and spellbinding reading.
THOMAS H. SHAFER JR.
New York City

SHORT CIRCUIT
Sirs:
It's interesting to read that (according to New York publicity man Eddie Jaffe) the NFL players want closed-circuit theater TV for the league's 1963 championship game (SCORECARD. Jan. 14).

Did Mr. Jaffe ever stop to think what the public wants, especially the millions who have turned NFL turnstiles and kept them in business these past 15 years?
JAMES PHELAN
Munster, Ind.

HAWK-EYED
Sirs:
Having read The Black Hawks Are Bright Hopes (Jan. 14), I am beginning to wonder just how anybody could beat those "big, bad, bold Chicago Black Hawks." It seems to be Arlie Schardt's opinion that the Hawks are going to make a runaway of the NHL race this year. I would like to point out that the only reason they are at the top is because of Toronto's seemingly indifferent mood every time the Leafs play a team such as Boston or New York. Toronto has lost only two of nine games played with Chicago this year, and may I remind you that Chicago did not "barely" lose to Toronto last year in the finals. Toronto won, in Chicago!

Naturally, I am Toronto biased, but even the most ardent Chicago fan must admit it will be a hard struggle for any team, including the Black Hawks, to take the Stanley Cup away from our Leafs.
BLAIR SLADE
Toronto

SPORTSMAN
Sirs:
Thanks for your most excellent cover story on Terry Baker (Jan. 7). We are grateful for this outstanding recognition of a very deserving scholar-athlete and the accompanying recognition of Oregon State University.

Terry is also alltime "Sportsman of the Year" for Oregon State University and its student body. I have never seen or heard a greater and more resounding standing ovation than that accorded Terry by more than 8,000 basketball fans on the Saturday night when he was presented with three UPI All-America football awards. Terry had just finished another remarkable basketball-playing exhibition in the Oregon State-Washington State game.
FRED M. SHIDELER
Corvallis, Ore.

Sirs:
I have been impressed with many articles and cover pictures in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED but particularly so with the picture and story of Terry Baker. He is a fine example for all young boys—a great athlete and fine scholar.

However, I kept looking for something more until I realized there was no picture of Terry's mother, Mrs. Baker. She should be honored for her love, care and work for Terry and his brothers. Without her devotion and tenacity Terry might never have had the chance to prove himself.
F. H. EVANS
Anaheim, Calif.

•See above.—ED.

Sirs:
I had the pleasure of seeing Terry Baker perform in one of the few games that Oregon State lost (28-8 against Iowa).

Everyone in the stadium was truly impressed by Terry's mixture of running and passing, and even though he did not get much help from the rest of the team you could see his All-America quality. He is very well qualified for this fine honor.
JOHN LOUNSBERRY
Cedar Falls, Iowa

CLEVELAND MODELLS
Sirs:
Once again, in the viciously competitive world of professional sports, a coach has been fired. When a team does not measure up to expectations, it is always easier to blame the coach. The irony in the firing of Paul Brown is that the very reason for the high expectations the Cleveland fans have always had for the Browns found its origin in Paul Brown himself.

It is the height of hypocrisy for the Cleveland team to retain the name "Browns." If Owner-President Modell wishes to place his judgment on a higher plane than Paul Brown it would only be fitting to call the team the Cleveland Modells.
CARL ANDERSON
PAUL RUXIN
DICK SARVIS
Amherst, Mass.

VANTAGE POINT
Sirs:
I enjoyed the article on Loyola University's basketball team by Mervin Hyman and Tom Brody (BASKETBALL'S WEEK, Jan. 14). It was good to see George Ireland and his team get such well-deserved praise.

However, I would like to point out that Loyola has had some very fine basketball teams of national importance since the late '20s when the late Lennie Sachs guided a number of the Rambler teams to highly successful seasons. Sachs' 1938-39 team went undefeated in 21 games until beaten by Long Island University in the finals of what has now become the NIT.

Tom Haggerty's 1948-49 team was also a finalist in the NIT.
WALTER F. CONROYD
Wilmette, Ill.

Sirs:
You said that Loyola is "far and away the highest-scoring team in the country," but I wish to take issue with that. Gorham State Teachers College scored 1,010 points in its first 10 games this year, averaging over 100 points per game.
MAURICE JOSEPH DAWSON
Gorham, Me.

POWER FAILURE
Sirs:
I am writing to you on behalf of all amateur sports participants, myself included, especially those engaged in intercollegiate competition. The well-publicized power struggle between the Amateur Athletic Union and the NCAA-formed United States Track and Field Federation has ruined and is ruining much of the competitive drive of some of the country's best athletes—the collegians.

What college athlete with any ability wishes to risk his chances to make the United States Olympic team by going against AAU policy?

What college athlete with any ability wishes to risk his chances of competing in an intercollegiate championship by running in an AAU-sanctioned meet?

The answer to both these questions is, emphatically, none!

With other countries threatening to take the crown of world track supremacy from our heads, it is no time to engage in a silly dispute over which group will back the United States Olympic group.
KING HILL
Brunswick, Me.

•For General Douglas MacArthur's solution and SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S opinion, see page 5.—ED.

GOAL TO GO

Sirs:
I have always been interested in reducing injuries in sport. A few years ago on TV I watched Howard (Hopalong) Cassady, then with the Detroit Lions, catch an over-the-shoulder pass in Baltimore. He then banged into the goalpost and bounced back, but held his feet and went over for the score.

In the accompanying sketch I offer an idea for flying aluminum goalposts supported by a movable steel base which would reduce the danger of injury and open up the end zone for both running and passing plays.

Please note that the steel base would be entirely behind the end zone, while the uprights above the horizontal bar would be suspended directly over the goal line.

As for postgame mob vandalism: the entire surface could be coated with a clean, heavy lubricant. If you think this idea has any merit and a manufacturer would fabricate it, I'd like to send 100% of any royalties to the Boston Jimmy Fund.
AUSTIN C. DALEY
Providence

PHOTOTERRY BAKER AND MOTHERILLUSTRATION