19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

March 02, 1964

OVER THE BRIDGE
Sirs:
Quite recently I wrote complaining about your bridge coverage or lack of same. Now, after receiving your February 17 edition, I am happily mollified. Congratulations! Charles Goren's first article was excellent, and I see there will be more of the same.

I have only one quarrel. "Bridge is for fun"? Never!
WILLIAM J. HERMESMANN
Captain, USAF
Rantoul, Ill.

Sirs:
I would like to say that Goren's system is an excellent bidding system and probably the best for the beginner and casual player to learn and use. It is undoubtedly the most widely known bidding system in the world, and it makes more sense than artificial systems. However, when bidding precision is the goal, the more accurate and complex artificial bidding systems must be substituted for the system employing natural bids. The vast majority of bridge experts will readily agree. Indeed, several American experts have just recently proposed new artificial systems in response to the high bidding precision obtained by the successive international champions—the Italians—in using their artificial systems. But Goren has little to worry about; the casual players will always like natural systems—artificial systems are just too hard to learn!
DON R. LAIRD
Austin, Texas

Sirs:
The word Sports implies a great variety of physical competitions between two or more athletes or teams. By no stretch of the imagination does bridge qualify as such. With continued publishing of Goren's un-athletic subtleties of bidding, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED may yet become the handbook for the ladies' afternoon bridge club.
MARK MASON
Dallas

WINTER'S TALE
Sirs:
Congratulations on your fine coverage of the Winter Olympics. I watched the events on television using SI as a guide. Your predictions in the events were excellent. As much as I love football and baseball, the Olympics always rate No. 1 in my book, and SI rates tops for its coverage. Keep up the good work. I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of the summer events in Tokyo.
LARRY MCDONOUGH
North Bergen, N.J.

Sirs:
I appreciated most of your coverage of the Games, but Huston Horn's article on Scotty Allen and Terry McDermott (SI, Feb. 17) was an exception. In a year of relative Olympic failure these two young men were outstanding successes and should not be treated in a patronizing manner. Granted that the reader wants human interest, Mr. Horn might have done better to consider age and background in his story. If he had, he might have proved kinder.
HAROLD F. MOSHER JR.
Cincinnati

Sirs:
I have tremendous admiration for anyone who has the stamina, perseverance and discipline to become at the age of 14 a true champion, a credit to himself and his country, like Scotty Allen.
MRS. JOHN M. POWERS
Villanova, Pa.

Sirs:
Your comments on Dutch figure skater Sjoukje Dijkstra were a little bit off the track as Miss Dijkstra is considered by many to be a great champion. May I remind you that Miss Dijkstra was the only one of the figure skaters who was favored to win and who did so.
KATHY STONE
San Diego, Calif.

Sirs:
How come there was nothing said about Joan Hannah's 15th in the women's down-hill? True, this is not an excellent showing, but she has been training since before the 1960 Olympics and has now done fairly well in the midst of pretty fantastic competition.
LAWRENCE KEMP
Franconia, N.H.

JUDGMENTS
Sirs:
Many people have been disappointed with the performance of the U.S. figure skating team in the 1964 Olympics. This is not just the result of the disastrous airplane crash in 1961. It is partly a result of a poor selection of officials by the U.S. Figure Skating Association.

The U.S. pair skaters Vivian and Ronald Joseph placed fourth, 3/10 of a point behind third place and a bronze medal. The American judge marked them lower than many of the other judges, including the Russian judge. In the men's event another American judge placed Tommy Litz sixth in the free skating. No other judge except the Russian placed him lower than fourth.

It is well known that other judges give an advantage to their own countries' skaters, which is unfair. But isn't it worse to penalize our own skaters?
DAVID FREIMAN
Philadelphia

Sirs:
Will somebody please tell me what is wrong with the Olympic figure skating judges? In the men's competition, the German gold medal winner, in my opinion, deserved first place. But what really makes my hair stand on end is the ridiculous marks given the French entrant. He made at least six mistakes in his free skating and even fell on his rear end once. But he got higher marks than the United States entrant who skated an almost flawless program. I am sure there must be a lot of other people who saw this on television and agree with me.
A. GREENBERG
Springfield, Ohio

MEMORY
Sirs:
While going through some old clippings, papers, etc., recently, I came across pages 7 and 8 torn from the Feb. 28, 1955 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. The reason for keeping the clipping was the MEMO FROM THE PUBLISHER concerning the skiing accident on Jan. 30, 1955 to Jill Kinmont. In the memo an appeal was made for funds for her long hospitalization, etc. My husband and I made a small contribution at the time. Jill was almost assured of a place on the U.S. Winter Olympic team that year and since all sportsmen and women are thinking of Winter Olympics at this time I would like to know where she is, how she is, what she is doing, etc. Am sure there are a number of others among your readers who would appreciate this information.
CAROLYN J. MCCRAITH
Greensboro, N.C.

•Jill, now 27, lives with her family in Renton, Washington. Though still paralyzed, she completed an A.B. in German at UCLA in 1961 and is working toward a teaching certificate at the University of Washington. She specializes in the field of remedial education and will begin practice teaching in April.—ED.

COLD CASH
Sirs:
After reading The Sling of the Louisville Lip (SI, Feb. 17) I can only say "3 cheers for Tex Maule." It's about time someone gave Cassius Clay the credit he deserves. As for Liston, if an ill-tempered bum "beating the brains out" of someone with a little intelligence and imagination is what he calls progress, I think he has been misinformed.
BILL SPENCE
Los Gatos, Calif.

Sirs:
Even though he fancies himself a great poet, Cassius Clay could obviously never have written that fine article himself (My $1,000,000 Getaway, Feb. 24), but no matter. Whoever wrote it for him did a superb job of revealing what this seemingly egotistic and foolish but actually extraordinarily clever young man is up to. He deserves his million and I only hope he hangs on to it, regardless of what Liston may do to his handsome features.
ROBERT SAMPSON
New York City

OVER THE TOP
Sirs:
While serving as president of the University of Kentucky for seven years, it was my privilege to work closely with Adolph Rupp. The article in the February 17 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has caught more accurately the man, Coach Rupp, than any other story which I can recall.

He is not only a great coach but also a superb teacher. Congratulations on a top-notch article.
FRANK G. DICKEY
Atlanta

Sirs:
We feel that SI has also neglected to mention the fact that Vic Bubas has coached Duke to his 100th victory. This may not sound as impressive as the 700 victories of Adolph Rupp; however, this mark has been achieved in a brief five-year span, during which time the Blue Devils have ranked in the top 10, nationally, in four out of those five years.
CONRAD COHEN
JOHN GROVE
Durham, N.C.

Sirs:
You are failing to recognize a situation and a school which will someday turn the Southwest Conference into as big a power in basketball as it is now in football—Texas Tech. Tech, a team which for some reason SI has failed to rate even in the Southwest this year, has in the last three years won two conference championships, consistently defeated teams ranked higher in the Southwest by SI and played games against many of the best teams in the nation which would do credit to anyone.
JOHN P. CAREY
Lubbock, Texas

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)