19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

April 20, 1964

MASTERY
Sirs:
In regard to Dan Jenkins' article concerning the Masters and the Bon Air Hotel (Where Georgia Retaliates for Sherman's March, April 6), we feel that you owe the city of Augusta a public apology.

If your staff does not appreciate the accommodations our city has to offer, then you may remain where you are. And we would like it a lot better if you would.
FRANK E. CLARK
JOE A. SCHMITZ
Augusta, Ga.

Sirs:
Mr. Jenkins' surmise as to the origin of the soap sliver ("most likely left behind by some carpetbagger") was the only hint of truth in the whole article.
RONALD F. GALLOWAY, M.D.
Augusta, Ga.

Sirs:
Poor hotels Augusta may have. Poor restaurants as well. But you neglected to mention Augusta's foremost attraction: more good-looking girls per square foot than any city in America. Take it from a North Carolinian who knows.
CHARLES DAVANT III
Woodberry Forest, Va.

Sirs:
Your Master's issue arrived in time to give me a refreshing, but, alas, vicarious visit to Augusta. For three of the past five years some friends and I have made the rushed 1,000-mile trek via automobile on self-imposed absences from our college studies. I still vividly recall a couple of visits to the Bon Air and the Red Lion.

However, we cannot include ourselves among the Bon Air's illustrious alums. During seven of our nine nights in Augusta we solved the sleeping problem by sprawling out on the four-foot seats of our car. Our favorite parking spot was near an entrance to a parking lot close to the fifth green. One morning we were politely awakened and served coffee by the first attendant on duty.
THOMAS F. WARREN
Rock Island, Ill.

Sirs:
Dan Jenkins' story on the sidelines at the Masters makes me wish I could sell everything I own and go to Augusta to "vote for Mutimer." Thanks, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, for your April 6 issue.
MICHAEL LINDLEY
Dallas

Sirs:
Maybe the Masters has outgrown Augusta, but give us time.
WILLIAM F. MAGUIRE
Augusta, Ga.

TWO OUT
Sirs:
In your list of the eight top contenders for the Masters, you forgot to include Sam Snead and Julius Boros who tied for third last year.
ROBERT WALKER
Portage, Ind.

•It was insight, not oversight; neither one made it past the cut.—ED.

JOLTS AND SCARS
Sirs:
I enjoyed Martin Kane's article, (Two Guys Named Joe Jolt Ithaca April 6), tremendously, and I am looking forward to seeing more stories on collegiate wrestling. However, as a former high school wrestler from Nassau County, Long Island, I cannot agree with Martin Kane's statement that "Pennsylvania is the only area in the East where wrestling enjoys genuine stature."

In most Nassau County schools wrestling as a sport attracts more participants and spectators than either football or basketball. From its small land area and population, as compared to the whole state of Pennsylvania, Nassau County sends a continuous supply of wrestlers to the top wrestling colleges in the East.

Nassau County is also a consistent winner of the New York State title. This year it won nine out of 13 individual championships. At the NCAA tournament Dick Slutzky, a former county champion, lost in the finals of the 157-pound class.
MICHAEL J. HUTTER
Providence, R.I.

Sirs:
I was very disappointed to see only one sentence about Iowa State's Gordon Hassman, who won the 157-pound title.

During the course of the year, Hassman scored 18 pins in winning 31 straight matches without a defeat. A week before the nationals, he won the Big Eight crown in his division and was voted the tournament's most outstanding wrestler. Last year, as only a sophomore, he placed third in the NCAA finals in the 167-pound bracket, after wrestling part of the season in the 147-pound class.
BUD LEGG
Ames, Iowa

Sirs:
Poor Martin Kane. There he was watching the Oklahomans and missing the top team in the East—Lock Haven State College.

Our own Fred Powell is the 123-pound champ and our 177-pound Jerry Swope finished third—and he's a sophomore!
REGINALD H. MILLER
Lock Haven, Pa.

Sirs:
Please tell me why Southern Illinois University was not mentioned.
LARRY GLAZER
Carbondale, Ill.

Sirs:
As a three-year wrestler for my high school (Beacon High), I am very surprised and shocked at the sheer foolishness of some of the wrestlers in Oklahoma. I had one of these so-called battle scars (a cauliflower ear) that some Oklahomans wear almost as "proudly as dueling scars" and I failed to see what was so good about it. These puffed ears were considered by the coach of our team and by any affected member as a severe pain in the neck.
JOHN BENNETT
Beacon, N.Y.

HAUNTING IRONY
Sirs:
Congratulations! If there is any color or dignity left in boxing, Tex Maule has found it (Dingy Haunt of Champions, April 6). With more places like the Fifth Street Gym, boxing might regain the popularity it once enjoyed.
MICHAEL ORISTANO
Mamaroneck, N.Y.

Sirs:
The picture accompanying Tex Maule's article is inadvertently a pretty severe indictment of boxing, since it shows a poster announcing a bout between the late Alejandro Lavorante and Cassius Clay. It is billed as a City of Hope "Fight for Lives." How ironic that boxing ended both the hopes and the life of Lavorante.
HARVEY M. SCHAPS
New York City

ROAD BLOCK
Sirs:
After reading Ross Macdonald's article (A Death Road for the Condor, April 6), I am more distressed than I thought possible. It seems we are now getting some misdirected Madison Avenue types in the Forest Service—and nothing could do our natural resources less service. They remind me of those who protest, for profit or pleasure, that conservationists are trying to keep nature away from people. Nature is not to be found at a particular crossing of longitudinal and latitudinal lines; it is not a spectacular hidden waterfall or a secluded forest grove. These are only parts of a whole panorama which already abounds in our national parks, where roads have long taught us to cherish nature by making us familiar with it. Now that we have more than enough roads, however, the call for continued building can only be considered greed.
HARRY N. HORNER
Kent, Ohio

Sirs:
The article further emphasized the irrevocable encroachment of man into virgin areas. Although the Regional Forester announced a delay on his decision, one thing is sure: eventually the road will be built and the condor eradicated. Articles of this nature and public indignation serve no purpose. How can they in a land devoted to pavement, billboards and neon?

Destroy, destroy.
THOMAS E. WALLMO
Northbrook, Ill.

Sirs:
Never have I seen a living giant condor. Neither would I wish to see one if the access roads permitting me to do so would destroy it and give future generations the conception that this great monument to history is and always has been a stuffed museum curio.
MRS. ROBIN R. OBETZ
Ada, Ohio

HE WHO GETS SLAPPED
Sirs:
I speak not only as a fan of Wally Jones, but as the voice of many basketball fans throughout the country. It is indeed a "slap in the face" to both Wally and us to have some "almighty" members of the Olympic selection committee pass over such a fine, talented player (Who Says You Can't Win 'Em All?, April 13). Anyone who has ever seen Wally play knows that what some committee members called "clowning" not only won games but provided many memorable moments of outstanding basketball.
GARY ZABRYCKI
Charlottesville, Va.

Sirs:
Clowning indeed. Baseball's Willie Mays might be clowning when he runs out from under his hat to make a basket catch, but is he any less an All-Star because of it?
JOHN M. HLAVACEK
JAMES W. PHILLIPS
JOSEPH M. PECOR
Madison, Wis.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)