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PEOPLE

May 11, 1964
May 11, 1964

Table of Contents
May 11, 1964

Droll Scandal
The Poor Boy Open
Al Kaline
Chop And Loop Champ
Motor Sports
Bridge
Dogs
The Life I Lead
  • A professional golfer's existence is the most complex and improbable of any athlete's, his victories and defeats coming amid an unceasing swirl of activities that are at once both mad and meaningful. Recently Tony Lema wrote a candid story about the climb toward the top in golf. Now, at the request of Sports Illustrated, Jack Nicklaus has kept a three-month journal that warmly illuminates a far different facet of the tour: the unique life of the superchamp

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

PEOPLE

"There may be one or two people dropping in for breakfast on Saturday," Governor Edward Breathitt of Kentucky warned his wife. So, not wishing to seem improvident, the hostess at the executive mansion in Frankfort laid in 15 country hams, 180 dozen eggs, several yards of sausages and enough beaten biscuit to pave a barnyard. The 1,000-odd guests who stopped by for a bite before taking the 40-mile trip to Louisville to watch the Derby pronounced it all delicious.

This is an article from the May 11, 1964 issue Original Layout

The Prime Minister of the new nation of Northern Rhodesia is such a firm believer in the benefits of physical fitness that he has turned his cabinet into a powerhouse soccer team (below). Premier Kenneth Kaunda, back row center in the picture, was so flushed with success after his ministers fought their way back to a draw from a 4-0 deficit in a recent game that he promptly flung a challenge overseas. "I should like our eleven," he said, "to take on the British cabinet." Whether Queen Elizabeth will ask Sir Alec Douglas-Home or Harold Wilson to form a football team to defend her nation's honor has not been determined.

Main R. Bocher, who designs and sells fashionable frocks for a pretty penny under the name Mainbocher, has long been an advocate of the good life—the expensive good life, that is. But he may have argued his case too strongly. Last week, presumably in search of the life his boss recommends, Arthur Keller, the general manager of Mainbocher's glittering Fifth Avenue salon, was hauled into court for dipping heavily into the company till so that he could buy a $79,000 yacht. "One of the reasons he went in for larceny," said a poetic prosecutor as the miscreant pleaded guilty, "was his burning desire to go down to the sea in ships with Mainbocher's money."

As every schoolboy knows, a BB gun is a Daisy air rifle, or at least it was until that other BB, France's sex kitten Brigitte Bardot, took to the air on behalf of the Oeuvre d' Assistance aux Bêtes d' Abattoirs, a French society dedicated to the prevention of cruelty to animals about to be slaughtered. Thanks to BB's eloquent pleading over TV, the French government has now passed a law providing that all animals be shot with a special anesthetizing pistol before being slugged to death.

"I didn't expect to get this far," said crack golfer Betty Grable James, nervously checking her watch before putting the last hole. Tied for the lead at Phoenix in a women's southwestern golf tournament, Betty was due at that very moment to meet her husband Harry James who had just flown home from Tokyo. What should a good wife do? Betty muffed the putt, lost the silver and dutifully hastened to Harry.

Despite the ample arsenal on all sides, there was more shouting than shooting at the Moscow May Day ceremonies, but Nikita Khrushchev did manage to blast off once. Strolling along the Moskva River before the parade with henchmen Anastas Mikoyan, Andrei Gromyko, Alexei Kosygin, Leonid Brezhnev and visiting fireman Ahmed Ben Bella, President of left-leaning Algeria, hotshot Nikita suggested a round of trap-shooting and promptly brought down the first clay pigeon himself.

The Los Angeles Fats of the onetime Brooklyn Dodgers is not the lippy old pool-hall pro, Leo Durocher, as one might suspect, but his boss, respectable Walter Alston—which may be one reason why the two have yet to meet over a pool table. Having shot a masterful run of 129 in a quiet game of lineup before the Dodgers' first game, Manager Alston has sworn off for the duration. "It might not look good for me to be messing around a pool hall during the baseball season," says the cautious Walt.

Sojourning on the shores of Italy's Lake Como while he pores over notes for a forthcoming autobiography, West Germany's durable Konrad Adenauer is enjoying a reunion at 88 with an old boyhood love—the Italian game of boccie. "Boccie," says Der Alte, who takes time out every afternoon to play a round or two with local workmen, "is the finest game there is for settling the nerves and keeping the muscles in shape."

Svelte Princess Soraya of the Riviera and points east lost her job as Queen of Iran because she failed to give her husband a son and heir. But Soraya is taking no chances of being disqualified from her latest job—as a movie queen. In order to stay trim and glamorous enough to play the part of a princess in Dino De Laurentiis' new flick, The Secret, the ex-Queen is secretly playing tennis every morning before work on a carefully screened court in Rome.

If the crowds start chanting "We like Ike!" at The Merion Cricket Club a week or two from now, they will likely be cheering another winning team. As his running mate against Wizard of Ozman Ray Bolger and Fashion Plate Jimmy Demaret in a forthcoming charity golf match, onetime habitual front-runner Dwight D. Eisenhower has picked that old four-time Master Arnold Palmer himself.

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