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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Aug. 17, 1964
Aug. 17, 1964

Table of Contents
Aug. 17, 1964

Letter To The Publisher
Three Arms
'I Managed Good'
Fishing
Track & Field
Motor Sports
Hudson River
Baseball's Week
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

BEAUTY AND THE BUSH
Sirs:
Re: your article The Word for New York is Bush (August 3). Mr. McCabe, you are so right!
BEN H. LEE
Indianapolis

This is an article from the Aug. 17, 1964 issue Original Layout

Sirs:
Columnist Charles McCabe, "The Fearless Spectator," as he is known to his captive audience on the West Coast, has long made the local press a vehicle for his personal vendetta against New York City. But the appearance of his snide vituperations in a periodical of your stature must have been his most glorious moment.
JON A. RANTZMAN
San Francisco

Sirs:
I have had the dubious good fortune of being exposed on a daily basis to both the vituperative slants of Clure (Scrooge) Mosher and the cultured causticity of Charles McCabe. Therefore, I was extremely delighted to see them both featured in your magazine and especially to read Mr. McCabe's endearing description of that metropolis for which Mr. Mosher has departed.

On the basis of Mr. McCabe's article, I can safely predict that New York's sports fans will truly take Mr. Mosher to their hearts, even as they have the Mets, for, as John Underwood so brilliantly illustrated a year ago in your magazine, Clure Mosher is a true busher, born and bred.
ROBERT SCHWARCZ
Coral Gables, Fla.

Sirs:
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder; people see only what they want to see. Like a little boy, frightened of being a sucker, Mr. McCabe put on a defiant face and criticized all he saw. His article must have been written before he ever went back to New York, and thus he didn't even give the city a chance. If he only had let himself go for a minute, he would have seen the beauty as well as the ugliness, and the good times as well as the bad times. Offhand, the only statistic I can remember about San Francisco is that it has the highest number of homosexual bars in the country. Let Mr. McCabe go back to his paradise of the West. I'll take Manhattan.
RICHARD OLDERMAN
Fairfield, Conn.

Sirs:
Charles McCabe proves beyond doubt what true New Yorkers have always felt and may now state: New York has been and is being ruined by "auslanders," and "other instant New Yorkers," while San Francisco owes whatever charm it may have to transplanted New Yorkers—like Charles McCabe.
CHARLES E. SIMBERKOFF
Mount Vernon, N.Y.

Sirs:
Great!
WILLIAM R. HEAD
Flushing, N.Y.

Sirs:
Charles McCabe writes, "The Met fans have muchly been talked about. Most of what has been written is bunk." Why then must he add to the heap?
PETER MAECK
Weston, Conn.

LITTLE MAN
Sirs:
Thanks for the very interesting article by Tommy McDonald (The Monsters and Me, July 27 and August 3). I have long been an ardent admirer of the little men in pro football, such as McDonald, Eddie LeBaron and Doak Walker. May their tribe increase!
LEX KAVANAUGH
Long Beach, Calif.

Sirs:
I can't believe that Tommy McDonald really finds it hard to tell someone what a great player he thinks he is. As a matter of fact, that seems to be his major purpose throughout the article. He may have caught quite a few passes in his stay with the Eagles, but that was quite probably due to the fact that there were few other receivers for Eagle quarterbacks to throw to.

I think it will be different with the Cowboys who already have two of the best receivers in the business in Buddy Dial and Frank Clarke. The passes will be coming his way a bit less than before, and he will find it hard to build an impressive set of statistics.

However, he will also have a new advantage in that a defense cannot double-team him without leaving an equally good receiver open somewhere else on the field. If he can overcome his showboating enough to play for the team in Dallas and not for himself, he will be a valuable asset.
BRYANT P. WOODS
Nederland, Texas

NOT DIT
Sirs:
The American Committee for the Election of Marv Throneberry to the Yankee Old Timers Day team (SCORECARD, August 3) is ACFTEOMTTTYOTDT, pronounced ac-fit-ee-omitty-ott-dit, not ACFTEOFMTTTYODT, pronounced ac-fit-ee-off-mitty-ott.
ALAN BAXTER
Los Angeles

•It is not; the ACFTEOFMTTTYODT prefers Oldtimers as one word.—ED.

Sirs:
To call the annual Yankee Old Timers Day game "baseball's most boring annual ritual" is incredible. To me this game is always the highlight of the season. If you call this boring, you should read your magazine from time to time—then you'll really know what the word boring means.
THOMAS L. DETIENNE
New York City

RIGHT-HAND DIAMOND
Sirs:
Whoever laid out the first baseball diamond anyway? I'm wondering why he laid it out backward.

It would seem that a clockwise rotation of bases would make more sense than the accustomed route. Most players are natural-born right-handers, and many of those who bat left-handed today have converted from their natural position to take advantage of this cockeyed backward rotation.

Swinging right-handed, it would be a distinct advantage to run in the direction of the swing down the left-field line, rather than the right. The right-handed pitcher would have a better throw to first base, holding the runner close. The right-handed first baseman would have a distinct advantage in making infield plays, especially in double-play situations.

There would be some disadvantages also, I suppose. The "hot corner" usually handled by the third baseman would be all the hotter when handled by the first baseman and pitcher covering.

I guess, all in all, it would make a completely different game out of our national sport, but I would like to see it tried sometime. Whether the sport would be improved or not, I'm not sure, but I do believe it would be a more natural approach.
THE REV. MILO L. ERNSTER
Winona, Minn.

KITES AND KIDS
Sirs:
Tomi Ungerer (The Kitemaker, August 3) is a most interesting person, but much more talented than your article implied. As a first-grade teacher I happen to know that he is not only an artist and kitemaker, but a writer. He is the author and illustrator of some of the most exciting children's books in existence.
VIRGINIA MILLER
Phoenix

Sirs:
The world of sports must certainly be in sad shape when the most famous sports magazine in the country devotes eight pages to a kitemaker.
CLIFFORD J. SIMPSON
Indiana, Pa.

BEATLE TONY
Sirs:
I must commend Frank Deford's article (Not Much To Do But Eat, Sleep and Play Baseball, August 3) on the promising young rookie, Tony Conigliaro. I have been a Bosox fan since Ted Williams joined the major leagues, and I must say this young man has the credentials to be great.
RICHARD WOLPER
Atlanta

Sirs:
Your article on Tony Conigliaro was great. He is even better than the Beatles. If every major league team had more Tonys or Rick Reichardts, more teen-aged girls would be going to more games. Wow!
ELLEN TOMBER
St. Louis

SNOWBALLS
Sirs:
Your July 20 issue had three related articles that I think merit some comment. The first was James M. O'Hara's letter concerning musical franchises (19TH HOLE). The second was your not-so-humorous editorial involving the rumored shift of the Milwaukee Braves to Atlanta (SCORECARD). The third concerned the Los Angeles Angels' move to Mickey Mouseville (Call Them Mickey's Mice or Pluto's Pups). The latter needs little consideration since I feel the Autry clan had a legitimate complaint. However, Mr. O'Hara's letter concerning the moving of the Denver hockey franchise concludes with an interesting remark: "the long-term result is to alienate many potential sports dollars throughout the country in all of professional sport."

How true! When the speculated Milwaukee shift gained popularity a few weeks ago, a friend of mine remarked, "If the Braves move to Atlanta, I think I'll quit following major league baseball, except for an occasional glance at the standings."

This alienation of sports fans throughout the country is snowballing whether money-hungry owners care to admit it or not.
EDWARD E. SCHLUMPF
Menomonee Falls, Wis.