19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 27, 1964

OLYMPIC CYCLE
Sirs:
Let's have more articles like the one on Cyclist Jackie Simes (Lure of the Wild While Noise, Sept. 14). It is pitiful that he gets more support from the Danes than from his fellow Americans.
JIM KELSO
Yakima, Wash.

Sirs:
Thanks a million for a fine article. Not only have you given your readers an accurate and most engaging portrait of this cyclist, you have given his sport some fine healthy publicity. That "wild white noise" will next be heard in Tokyo.
MRS. EARL BEECHER
Allentown, Pa.

Sirs:
I would like Jack Simes to know that all of us in the U.S. who have an interest in amateur cycling will be following his fortunes in the coming Olympics. To return home with a gold medal or any medal for that matter would be just the tonic that bicycle racing needs in the U.S.
DAVE DINGMAN
Minneapolis

DIRTY POOL
Sirs:
In your SCORECARD column of Sept. 7, you mentioned a racial incident that took place during the Chargers' recent preseason game in Atlanta, and said it occurred in a poolroom at the Hilton Inn. It did not. True, the Hilton Inn is near Atlanta in the city of Hapeville, but the poolroom in question is not, nor ever was, located in the Hilton Inn, nor is it owned or operated by the Hilton Inn. It is owned by a private citizen.

I certainly hope that you will see to it that the air is cleared as far as the location of the poolroom is concerned. Thank you for your fine coverage of the San Diego Chargers.
BARRON HILTON
San Diego

WOLF WHISTLES
Sirs:
Jack Olsen's Sounds and Hounds of a Texas Wolf Hunt (Sept. 14) has affirmed my belief that Texas is a land of mental midgets.
GLEN JONES
Victoria, B.C.

Sirs:
As a participant in and lover of almost all sports, I still find it difficult to consider hunting as sport. Your article described a particularly cruel method of destroying a very courageous and noble species of wild life.

Although most of us are passively cruel by permitting this type of activity to exist in our civilization, your article described the hunter as he is—one who differs from others by becoming actively cruel. Man is almost the only animal that kills for pleasure. The excuse often given is that people are more important than animals.

Let's hope that your article lights a spark within some Texas readers to enact a law that prevents cruelty toward anyone or anything.
GEORGE P. KINKLE JR.
Los Angeles

Sirs:
Revolting! No other word can describe your article on the Texas sport of wolf hunting. It is hard to believe that such inhumane activities are tolerated in today's society, but then what more can be expected from such ignorant slobs. It's obvious who needs the "load of No. 7 shot."
ROGER J. HARMON
Los Angeles

OUT OF EAGLE'S NEST
Sirs:
Congratulations to SI and Bob Ottum for the fine and complete article on Bill Cox (Tense Skipper for a Taut Ship, Aug. 31). I've known Coxie and raced against him for many, many years. He has certainly put his all into the Eagle this year, as you suggest.

However, it is somewhat inaccurate to say that John Nichols "dropped out of the crew at the end of the preliminary trials." The fact is John was fired. He was fired not face-to-face but over the telephone after he had gone home to Port Chester at the end of the New York Yacht Club Cruise—and he was fired not by Cox but by the manager of the Aurora Syndicate, because he "didn't know enough."

Now John Nichols raced with me for four years on Weatherly as head man on the fore-deck. He made a boat that was slow upwind go downwind very fast indeed with the result that under our guidance Weatherly won three Queen's Cups, a couple of Clucas Cups (for the best elapsed time on the longest run of the NYYC Cruise), one Astor Cup, three Hovey Bowls (emblematic of the 12-meter season championship) and the Cygnet Cup in 1961 for the outstanding performance on the NYYC Cruise, plus the NINA Trophy and Vineyard Trophy in the 1961 Vineyard Race.

In my opinion, John Nichols has no peer except Rod Stephens Jr. in jib or spinnaker handling and trimming. I've sailed and raced with both of them probably more than anyone else over a great many years. They both know their stuff and know how to handle themselves, aboard any boat of any size.

Furthermore, it is my opinion (which no one has asked for), that there were three factors that were mainly responsible for the selection of Constellation over American Eagle: 1) the removal of John Nichols, 2) the addition of Rod Stephens to Constellation (and you can bet your bottom dollar that this move "pulled" the crew of Connie right together) and 3) the new helmsman of Connie, Bob Bavier Jr., who is no slouch at steering anything.
ARTHUR KNAPP JR.
Larchmont, N.Y.

RYUN'S RACE
Sirs:
I feel compelled to compliment you on your coverage of Jim Ryun's preparation for the Olympic trials (A Kansas Boy with a Man-size Task, Sept. 14). Your article made me feel advance pressures, strategies, and determinations. Most impressive however, was rereading it after the race.

Surely no one featured with such speculation on your cover has ever come on so magnificently. Ryun did all the things expected of and predicted for him and added that ingredient he had lacked before.

I have seen the video tape three times, including slow motion, and I will never forget that skinny 17-year-old form in the never-say-die drive that nailed a fine older runner at the finish line and got him his trip to Tokyo. It certainly was not a brilliant strategy race for Jim Ryun. He ran all over the track and many extra meters, but the things he lacks he can learn. What he showed he has fully justifies all the attention he has been given. May all your choices prove so apt!
HARRY CROSBY
La Jolla, Calif.

Sirs:
What a shame and a pity, that a coach could be so selfish as to force a teen-ager into competition in the manner that Bob Timmons is pushing Jim Ryun. I am sorry for both of them.
CHARLOTTE C. MARSH
South Burlington, Vt.

BUSHY LOOK
Sirs:
The September 14 issue of SI devotes eight pages to something you people call "the sporting look." The sad part of it all is that every page means one less page devoted to sports, truly a shameful waste!
E. W. BAGLIN
Huntsville, Ala.

Sirs:
Those monk-strap shoes and that Australian bush hat are ridiculous.
JANET SIMPSON
Chicago

DENDY ON SONNY
Sirs:
As a subscriber to your publication from its first issue, I wish to make a few observations anent your article, To Fight or Not to Fight? (Sept. 7). Over a period of many years you have carried items relating to the National Boxing Association and later the World Boxing Association. Most of these news stories, in my opinion, were critical of these organizations. I will admit that at times criticism was justified, but I do think that the current article was unfair and did not contain all of the facts relating to certain actions taken at the 1964 convention of the World Boxing Association.

With reference to myself and Brooks Dendy, your reporter failed to record my opening remarks with regard to this man. During the tenure of Joe Louis as heavyweight champion of the world, Dendy was the Negro golf champion of the U.S. For some three or four years these two champions of golf and boxing toured the U.S. giving exhibition matches; hence I consider Dendy fully qualified to express an opinion on Sonny Liston. What he said, in my opinion, accurately expresses the thinking of a majority of the sports fans of the world.
JOHN Y. JORDAN JR.
Asheville Boxing Commission
Asheville, N.C.

FORGOTTEN CHAMPS
Sirs:
Frank Deford's recent article on Roy Emerson (Bright Shine on an Old Shoe, Sept. 7) was well done, but in essence he failed to mention the really salient features of Emo's game; he is an errorless machine from the baseline and possesses the soundest ground strokes in amateur tennis.

Deford really goofed when he said that Rod Laver "has found a swift professional obscurity." Laver today is one of the three best tennis players in the world, and it is almost impossible to say who is the best among Laver, Rosewall and Gonzalez. If Deford had done the proper research he would have known that Laver beat both Rosewall and Gonzalez to win the U.S. pro grass court championship in July in Brookline, Mass. He has also won other big pro tournaments and, after a slow start, is one of the three best in the world. How obscure can you get?
GEORGE R. PENDLEY
Atlanta

•As obscure as the world's three best tennis players.—ED.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)