THE FAVORITES IN TOKYO 1964

October 04, 1964

[This articlecontains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

 

FAVORITE

SECOND

THIRD

ANALYSIS

TRACK & FIELD

100 METERS

HAYES, U.S.A.

FIGUEROLA, Cuba

JEROME, Canada

Hayes, who runs violently, awkwardly and powerfully,will win the 100, barring personal disaster. His closest challenger should bethe steady Figuerola, fourth in Rome in 1960 but just 40 inches from goldthere. Two other Latins, Esteves and Herrera of Venezuela, could surprise. Inthe 200, Carr, who is powerful but also smooth and graceful, may find teammateDrayton nearest him at finish if opponents fail to match Drayton's anticipated20.4 time. U.S. relay team, traditionally fast but inept at baton-passing, willbe helped by larger batonpassing zone—but keep an eye on Venezuela and maybeGermany.

200 METERS

CARR, U.S.A.

ROBERTS, Trinidad

OTTOLINA, Italy

400-METER RELAY

U.S.A.

FRANCE

ITALY

400 METERS

MOTTLEY, Trinidad

LARRABEE, U.S.A.

WILLIAMS, U.S.A.

Mottley has not run in competition since May—which maynot matter if he has kept up training, since no 400-meter man has more sheerspeed. But either Larrabee, who ended the summer with a world-record-tying44.9, or Williams, with his lifting finish, could take it all. Others:Brightwell (Great Britain), Trousil (Czechoslovakia), Badenski (Poland). U.S.1,600-meter relay team seems much the best. Snell is still not sure that hewill run in the 800, in which he would be supreme; if he does, he may bevulnerable in the 1,500 final after at least five races in nine days. Like theAmericans, Snell likes to come off the pace with a mad final-lap dash to thetape. Others to watch: Crothers (Canada) and Kerr (Jamaica) in the 800; Jazy(France) and Baran (Poland) in the 1,500.

1,600-METER RELAY

U.S.A.

GERMANY

GREAT BRITAIN

800 METERS

SNELL, New Zealand

GROTH, U.S.A.

SIEBERT, U.S.A.

1,500 METERS

SNELL, New Zealand

BURLESON, U.S.A.

O'HARA, U.S.A.

5,000 METERS

SCHUL, U.S.A.

CLARKE, Australia

BAILLIE, New Zealand

Roelants of Belgium would be odds-on favorite insteeplechase except for recent leg injury, which upset his training. Vincent isall but unknown, but reports are glowing. Schul, possessor of outstandinglast-lap kick, is first American favorite in distance race since the dark ages,but he faces superb field. Clarke, Baillie. Halberg and Bolotnikov (latter twowere gold medalists in 5,000 and 10,000 in Rome) all may run both 5,000 and10,000. Picture runner Clarke is immensely strong but lacks sprint—which couldhurt him in the shorter race. New Zealanders and Aussies have trained brutallyhard. In the marathon Japan's Kimihara has the incalculable advantage ofcompeting in his homeland. Heatley has fastest marathon ever run. Ethiopia'sBikila, who won in Rome, had an appendectomy in September.

10,000 METERS

CLARKE, Australia

BOLOTNIKOV, U.S.S.R.

HALBERG, New Zealand

MARATHON

KIMIHARA, Japan

EDELEN, U.S.A.

HEATLEY, Great Britain

STEEPLECHASE

VINCENT, Australia

HERRIOTT, Great Britain

SPAN, Yugoslavia

110-METER HURDLES

JONES, U.S.A.

DAVENPORT, U.S.A.

LINDGREN, U.S.A.

U.S. hurdlers seem to make the most use of theirmedical insurance but are still peerless. Not even having one short leg stopsJones, who was third in 110 in Rome. Lindgren broke his ankle last year.Cawley's legs have ached since time began, yet last month he ran world-record49.1. Luck merely had a 49.4 and mononucleosis.

400-METER HURDLES

CAWLEY, U.S.A.

LUCK, U.S.A.

HARDIN, U.S.A.

HIGH JUMP

BRUMEL, U.S.S.R.

CZERNIK, Poland

RAMBO, U.S.A.

High Jumper Brumel has won everything except Olympicgold. Czernik consistently clears 7 feet. Thomas (U.S.A.), unless mentally up,will be on the outside looking in again. This summer Boston broke thebroad-jump mark with 27 feet 4¼ inches, but old nemesis Ter-Ovanesyan hasgeared his program to peak in Tokyo. Pole Vaulter Hansen set records twice thisseason (his best: 17 feet 4 inches). Both Kravchenko and Davis are able to getoff the one long triple jump that could win. A bronze for Kreer would be histhird in a row. If Poland's Schmidt, the 1960 winner, is over his knee troublehe could earn a medal. Others to watch: Shavlakadze (U.S.S.R.) and Sneazwell(Australia) in high jump; Okazaki (Japan) in triple jump.

BROAD JUMP

BOSTON, U.S.A.

TER-OVANESYAN, U.S.S.R.

DAVIES, Great Britain

POLE VAULT

HANSEN, U.S.A.

PENNEL, U.S.A.

PREUSSGER, Germany

HOP, STEP & JUMP

KRAVCHENKO, U.S.S.R.

DAVIS, U.S.A.

KREER, U.S.S.R.

SHOTPUT

LONG, U.S.A

MATSON, U.S.A.

O'BRIEN, U.S.A.

No one so dominates his event as Long does theshotput. Weight training has given Matson power to go with size (6 feet 7, 255pounds). O'Brien, in his fourth Olympics, has competitive drive to add a bronzemedal to his two golds and one silver. Oerter had to outdistance previousworld-record holders to earn his two gold medals in discus. Now he must beatDanek, who broke Oerter's world mark in August and has since proved it was noone-shot effort. Klim's progress with the hammer since August has been steady.For exercise—and laughs—Thun hoists spinet pianos with his index fingers. Thejavelin is one of the most unpredictable field events Pedersen set world marksof 285 feet 10 inches in July and 300 feet 11½ inches in September, but boththrows were made in Oslo. He has yet to come close to them away from home. Onlyby barest of margins (59 points) did Yang fail to win Rome decathlon. Newscoring table cuts points he can get in pole vault, his best event.Anticipating another close battle, Yang has worked hard on final event ofprogram, his worst, the 1,500-meter run.

DISCUS

DANEK, Czechoslovakia

OERTER, U.S.A.

SILVESTER, U.S.A.

HAMMER THROW

KLIM, U.S.S.R.

CONNOLLY, U.S.A.

THUN, Austria

JAVELIN

PEDERSEN, Norway

SIDLO, Poland

LUSIS, U.S.S.R.

DECATHLON

YANG, China

HOLDORF, Germany

STOROZHENKO, U.S.S.R.

20-KM. WALK

GOLUBNICHI, U.S.S.R

MATTHEWS, Great Britain

LINDNER, Germany

Golubnichi, who has cut more than three minutes offhis winning time of four years ago, should repeat in the shorter walk. U.S.walkers are not talented—or lucky—enough. One American, as he left the stadiumafter a walking race in the U.S.A.-U.S.S.R. meet in Los Angeles in July, wasgiven a ticket for jaywalking.

50-KM. WALK

HOHNE, Germany

NIHILL, Great Britain

PETTERSSON, Sweden

Women
100 METERS

McGUIRE, U.S.A.

COBIAN, Cuba

MEYER-ROSE, Germany

Although she is not supposed to be another Rudolph,McGuire may bring back enough gold from Tokyo to create a problem getting pastcustoms. She should take both sprints and could add another win in the relaythough U.S. girls will have to be faultless in baton-passing. Less than a monthago a team of Polish girls set a world record, but if the first three U.S.girls can stay reasonably close, McGuire should be able to make up the deficitfor a U.S. victory.

200 METERS

McGUIRE, U.S.A.

BURVILL, Australia

BENNETT, Australia

400-METER RELAY

U.S.A.

POLAND

GERMANY

400 METERS

ITKINA, U.S.S.R.

PACKER, Great Britain

CUTHBERT, Australia

The 400 is a new Olympic event for women. Itkina hasbeen in exceptional form since late August and should win unless North Korea'sKim, the world's best, competes. Another to watch is Amoore of Australia.Dupureur ran the fastest 800 of the year (2:03.9) in July but has notapproached that time recently; she should be outlasted by the well-trainedWillis (though Kim is tops in the 800, too). Irina Press, after equaling theworld hurdles mark of 11.5 several times this year, finally lowered it to 11.4last month, which is 3/10 second faster than her winning time in Rome.

800 METERS

WILLIS, Australia

DUPUREUR, France

SKOBZOVA, U.S.S R.

80-METER HURDLTS

I. PRESS, U.S.S.R.

KILBORN, Australia

YODA, Japan

HIGH JUMP

BALAS, Rumania

GERACE, Canada

WOODHOUSE, Australia

Three of the likely winners will be defending thefirst-place rankings they achieved in 1960: Balas in the high jump, TamaraPress in the shotput, Ozolina in the javelin. Balas represents the ultimate inwomen's high jumping. She is as tall (6 feet ½ inch) as she is talented, wasthe first woman to clear 6 feet and is the only one who can do so with anyregularity. For the first time in seven Olympics, a British girl may not finishsecond in the high jump. Britain could have a runner-up in the broad jump,though, and Rand might be a winner if she overcomes the jitters that plaguedher in Rome, where she had the best jump in the qualifying round, then wound upninth in the finals. Tamara Press, Irina's heftier sister, holds world recordsin both the shot and discus. She is as much of a favorite to win the women'sshotput as Long is to take the men's competition. Ozolina won the javelin inRome by more than seven feet and has been drawing farther and farther away fromher opponents ever since. In August she became the first woman to throw beyond200 feet. Irina Press should have only a modicum of trouble in winning thepentathlon, which is on the Olympic program for the first time.

BROAD JUMP

SHCHELKANOVA, U.S.S.R.

RAND, Great Britain

WHITE, U.S.A.

SHOTPUT

T. PRESS, U.S.S.R.

ZYBINA, U.S.S.R.

H√úBNER, Germany

DISCUS

T. PRESS, U.S.S.R.

MICHAILOVA, Bulgaria

LOTZ, Germany

JAVELIN

OZOLINA, U.S.S.R.

SCHWALBE, Germany

GERHARDS, Germany

PENTATHLON

I. PRESS, U.S.S.R.

RAND, Great Britain

KARDASH, U.S.S.R.

SWIMMING

100-METER FREESTYLE

ILMAN, U.S.A.

McGREGOR, Great Britain

SCHOLLANDER, U.S.A.

Inches perhaps only fractions of an inch-will separatethe swimmers at the end of the 100. France's Gottvalles lowered record to 52.9a month ago, lacks only consistency. Austin (U.S A.) has beaten both Ilman andSchollander. Saari could win three firsts, something no swimmer has ever done.However, beating Schollander in the 400 will not be easy. Saan's power shouldtell, though, in the 1,500. Windle went to an Aussie training camp in August,where he presumably improved his times but from which almost no news leakedout.

400-METER FREESTYLE

SCHOLLANDER, U.S.A.

SAARI, U.S.A.

NELSON, U.S.A.

1,500-METER FREESTYLE

SAARI, U.S.A.

WINDLE, Australia

ECHEVARRIA, Mexico

200-METER BREASTSTROKE

JASTREMSKI, U.S.A.

PROKOPENKO, U.S.S.R.

MATSUMOTO, Japan

When not swimming, breaststroker Jastremski studiesfor his law and medical degrees. Prokopenko spends his free hours scootingaround Soviet countryside on his motorcycle, throttle wide open. He swims thesame way, and his duel with Jastremski should be furious and frothy. Berry, therecord holder in the butterfly, is only non-American male who can be consideredan outright favorite in any event. The backstroke will be more closelycontested. Dilley (U.S.A.) and Kuppers (Germany) also bear watching. At Olympictrials Dilley upset both Graef and Bennett.

200-METER BUTTERFLY

BERRY, Australia

ROBIE, U.S.A.

SCHMIDT, U.S.A.

200-METER BACKSTROKE

GRAEF, U.S.A.

BENNETT, U.S.A.

FUKUSHIMA, Japan

400-METER INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

SAARI, U.S.A.

ROTH, U.S.A.

HETZ, Germany

Roth was the only one to beat Saari at any distance intrials. Saari was competing in water polo tryouts that same week. In Tokyo hewill just be swimming. Hetz, when in top form, can beat anyone.

400-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

U.S.A.

GERMANY

FRANCE

If the U.S.A. is to be beaten in a relay, it probablywill be the 800-meter freestyle. In the 400-meter medley, however, the Americanfoursome could become the first to crack 4 minutes. On that squad will be Mann,who a month ago was the first to swim the backstroke in one minute flat. Worthwatching: the Germans and Australians in medley, the Soviets in thefreestyle.

800-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

U.S.A.

JAPAN

AUSTRALIA

400-METER MEDLEY RELAY

U.S.A.

JAPAN

U.S.S.R.

THREE-METER SPRINGBOARD DIVE

ANDREASEN, U.S.A.

GORMAN, U.S.A.

SITZBERGER, U.S.A.

Among the few divers who could dent U.S. supremacy areBritain's Phelps and Mexico's Madrigal. After finishing fourth in Rome,Phelps's style was almost completely revamped by his coach. Webster is bestunder pressure. With three dives to go in Rome, he was third, but his finaldives were near perfect, and the gold medal was his.

10-METER PLATFORM DIVE

WEBSTER, U.S.A.

VITUCCI, U.S.A.

GOMPF, U.S.A.

Women
100-METER FREESTYLE

FRASER. Australia

STOUDER, U.S.A.

BELL, Australia

No one seems able to prevent Fraser from becoming thefirst swimmer, male or female, to win a gold medal in three Olympics. Nor doesanyone appear to be fast enough to stop Ramenofsky from winning the 400-meterrace and her first bit of gold. Others to watch: Hallock and Ellis (U.S.A.),Thome (Australia) in 100, Ljungren (Sweden) in 400.

400-METER FREESTYLE

RAMENOFSKY, U.S.A.

DUENKEL, U.S.A.

STICKLES, U.S.A.

200-METER BREASTSTROKE

PROZUMENCHOVA, U.S.S.R.

BIMOLT, Netherlands

RUYGROK, Australia

Prozumenchova has a hard name to pronounce and is justas hard to defeat. Yet, despite her record-smashing performances last spring,she will find it tough to open much of a lead in the backstroke. There willalso be a close finish in the butterfly. Kok may lose first place, if she hasnot recovered from strained muscles in her left arm. It is possible that theclosest of these three races will be the backstroke. Caron holds the worldrecord, but even this time is less than one second faster than those recordedby Tanaka and Ferguson.

100-METER BUTTERFLY

KOK, Netherlands

STOUDER, U.S.A.

DEVARONA, U.S.A.

100-METER BACKSTROKE

CARON, France

TANAKA, Japan

FERGUSON, U.S.A.

400-METER INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

DE VARONA, U.S.A.

RANDALL, U.S.A.

FINNERAN, U.S.A.

The individual medley, being held in the Olympics forthe first time, is de Varona's specialty. Here the swimmers must combine100-meter laps in the breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and freestyle.

400-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

U.S.A.

NETHERLANDS

AUSTRALIA

With Bimolt and Kok on the Netherlands' medley relaysquad, the American girls will be up against formidable opposition. This is notthe case in the freestyle relay, where U.S. teen-agers will paddle their way toa victory in a trifle more than 4 minutes.

400-METER MEDLEY RELAY

NETHERLANDS

U.S.A.

GERMANY

THREE-METER SPRINGBOARD DIVE

KRAMER, Germany

COLLIER, U.S.A.

GOSSICK, U.S.A.

Biggest shock to American aquatic forces in 1960 wasKramer's sweep of both diving titles. It was the first time an American girlhad not won on the springboard, and only the third loss in tower diving. IfKramer is fully recovered from knee trouble she had this spring she shouldagain be a double winner.

10-METER PLATFORM DIVE

KRAMER, Germany

COOPER, U.S.A.

TALMAGE, U.S.A.

BASKETBALL

U.S.A.

U.S.S.R.

BRAZIL

"Izvestia" has stated that "full supremacyof the U.S." in basketball is on the wane. It is true that the U.S. teamthis time lacks one real standout, a Russell or a Lucas, though Bradley couldbe a much-needed catalyst. U.S. has never lost so much as a game in Olympics,should be able to cope with Russians' height, Brazilians' speed.

BOXING
(10 events)

U.S.S.R.
3 gold, 2 silver, 3 bronze

U.S.A.
2 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

ITALY
1 gold, 3 silver, 2 bronze

Loss of Heavyweight Mathis (broken hand) may have costU.S. a gold medal. Flashiest, most proficient American boxer is Gibson (156pounds), who moves fast, hits hard. U.S.S.R. has assembled powerful team andSoviet quest for medals is made easier by the fact that Italians are not quiteup to their 1960 form.

CANOEING
(7 events)

HUNGARY
2 gold, 2 silver, 3 bronze

U.S.S.R.
2 gold, 2 silver 2 bronze

GERMANY
1 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze

U.S., for a change, has hope for a medal or two. Foxand Perrier are a threat in women's kayak pairs. Men's relay team from theCalifornia Kayak Club also has a chance for a medal. The Germans are a medalthreat in almost every event.

CYCLING
(7 events)

ITALY
3 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

BELGIUM
2 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

FRANCE
1 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

One swift American and an international feud addluster to the 1,000-meter sprint. Simes is a bona fide speedster who hasoutside chance for a medal. Belgium's Sercu lost his world championship on adisqualification last month, wants revenge in Tokyo against the Italian who wasplaced first and the Frenchman who lodged the foul claim. Italians should beformidable, especially in road races.

EQUESTRIAN
(6 events)

AUSTRALIA
2 gold, 1 silver

ITALY
1 gold, 2 silver, 1 bronze

GERMANY
1 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

Australians have three of the four riders who helpedwin three-day event in 1960, have spared no expense ($60,000 to prepare teamfor Tokyo) to insure a repeat. Italy's D'lnzeo brothers will be hard todethrone in the grand prix competition.

FENCING
(8 events)

HUNGARY
3 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

POLAND
2 gold, 3 silver

U.S.S.R.
2 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

Italians, who won two medals in team events in Rome,plus three in individual matches, have slumped so badly that anything beyondone or two third places will be a surprise. As always, Hungarians areoutstanding in saber competition. Russians will dominate foils.

FIELD HOCKEY

INDIA

PAKISTAN

AUSTRALIA

India, in attempt to regain the Olympic title it lostto Pakistan in Rome, has worked doubly hard, perhaps too hard. It has lostpre-Olympic matches, but is still a shaky favorite.

GYMNASTICS
(14 events)

U.S.S.R.
7 gold, 6 silver, 5 bronze

JAPAN
7 gold, 4 silver, 4 bronze

ITALY
2 silver, 2 bronze

Japanese have prepared themselves for all-out effortin their home country. The men, with Endo taking all-round title, are superb.U.S.S.R. will get most of its medals in women's events (they took 15 in Rome),though improved Japanese women may make slight inroad.

JUDO
(4 events)

JAPAN
3 gold, 1 silver

NETHERLANDS
1 gold

U.S.S.R.
1 silver, 1 bronze

Japanese feel they can win three gold medals and onesilver in this, the first Olympic judo competition. But they want that fourthgold one. The man they will have to defeat to get it is Geesink, a 6-foot6-inch 290-pounder from The Netherlands. It was Geesink who beat the Japanesein 1961 and ended their all-time reign over judo.

MODERN PENTATHLON

Team: HUNGARY
Individual: Toeroek (Hungary)

Team: U.S.S.R.
Individual: Novikov (U.S.S.R.)

Team: U.S.A.
Individual: Nagy (Hungary)

Although Hungary banned its two best contestantsbecause of unsportsmanlike behavior, the No. 3 entry (Dr. Toeroek) appears goodenough to win individual honors. With Hungary weakened, however, Russia couldwin the team title. Sweden might slip by U.S. for third.

ROWING
(7 events)

GERMANY
3 gold, 2 silver, 1 bronze

U.S.S.R.
2 gold, 2 silver

CANADA
1 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

Russia's Ivanov seems unbeatable in single sculls.Spero (U.S.A.) could finish within shouting distance of him and take secondplace. There is hardly a German boat that is not a candidate for a medal.German victories seem highly probable in coxed pairs and the eights, with theRatzeburg Rowing Club out to defend its victory of 1960.

SHOOTING
(6 events)

U.S.S.R.
3 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

U.S.A.
2 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

AUSTRIA
1 gold, 2 bronze

America's only gold medalist in Rome, McMillan, willbe back to try again in rapid-fire pistol matches. Anderson has chance formedal in free rifle, but overall it will be the Soviets who will be the bigshots.

SOCCER

HUNGARY

YUGOSLAVIA

BRAZIL

Italy, one of the early gold-medal favorites, withdrewbecause some of its players had competed against professionals. Aggressive,offensive-minded Hungarians will have to get by rugged Yugoslavs and swiftBrazilians to come out on top.

VOLLEYBALL

U.S.S.R. (men)
JAPAN (women)

RUMANIA (men)
POLAND(women)

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (men)
U.S.S.R. (women)

Another new event on the schedule. Unsentimentalfavorites, but decisive favorites nonetheless, are the Kaizuka Amazons, theJapanese women's team. After years of almost torturous drill sessions, they arein a class by themselves. American women have hope, but it remains slim. U.S.men will be outclassed in Tokyo.

WATER POLO

YUGOSLAVIA

ITALY

HUNGARY

After having won four gold medals in five Olympicsfrom 1932 through 1956, the Hungarians were shocked by third-place finish lasttime. They have reorganized their team, infusing it with younger talent, butthey may not be quite ready yet, especially when they go against the moreexperienced Yugoslavs and Italians.

WEIGHT LIFTING
(7 events)

U.S.S.R.
4 gold, 2 silver, 1 bronze

POLAND
1 gold, 3 silver, 2 bronze

U.S.A.
1 silver, 3 bronze

A former Russian champion reportedly "degeneratedinto a drunk and wife-beater because he could not stand the burden offame." Russian officials and wives are eager to point out that most otherSoviet tit lists simply keep on winning. Led by two of the best heavyweights inthe world, the U.S.S.R. will be almost as overwhelming as in Rome.

WRESTLING
(16 events)

TURKEY
6 gold, 3 silver, 4 bronze

IRAN
3 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze

U.S.S.R.
3 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

Despite poor record in international matches in recentyears, U.S. wrestlers have been improving. They are still comparative novicesin Greco-Roman bouts (no holds below the waist), but they have toughenedthemselves in freestyle, which is akin to collegiate wrestling. Simons, Ruthand Brand are potential medal winners. Turks have lost some of their depth, butthe Russians have not. Other leading contenders will be Bulgaria, Iran andHungary.

YACHTING
(5 events)

DENMARK
1 gold, 2 silver, 1 bronze

U.S.A.
1 gold, 1 silver

ARGENTINA
1 gold

In six tries in Olympic Star racing, the U.S. has wonthree golds, one silver, one bronze. Another gold is not out of reach. Tospread talent from Star class around, North, a three-time world Star champion,was urged to try Dragon class. He switched, now should put up good fight formedal in that event. Among the entrants in the 5.5-meter race is Prince Harald,heir apparent to the Norwegian throne.

WHERE ALL THIS YEAR'S MEDALS WILL GO
Below is Sports Illustrated's estimate of how the 499 Olympic medals will hedistributed among the slightly more than 6,600 athletes from 99 countries

NATION

G

S

B

AFGHANISTAN

ALGERIA

ARGENTINA

1

 

AUSTRALIA

7

5

10

AUSTRIA

1

 

7

BAHAMAS

BARBADOS

BELGIUM

2

2

2

BERMUDA

BOLIVIA

BRAZIL

 

1

2

BRITISH GUIANA

BULGARIA

2

3

1

BURMA

CAMBODIA

CAMEROONS

CANADA

1

2

3

CEYLON

CHAD

CHILE

CHINA (NATIONALIST)

1

COLOMBIA

CONGO

COSTA RICA

CUBA

 

2

CZECHOSLOVAKIA

2

4

6

DENMARK

2

2

1

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

ECUADOR

ETHIOPIA

FINLAND

 

1

1

FRANCE

4

3

5

GERMANS

9

13

15

GHANA

GREAT BRITAIN

2

7

6

GREECE

1

 

1

HONG KONG

HUNGARY

9

7

9

ICELAND

INDIA

1

1

INDONESIA

IRAN

3

3

1

IRAQ

IRELAND

ISRAE.

ITALY

5

12

12

IVORY COAST

JAMAICA

JAPAN

13

8

7

JORDAN

KENYA

LEBANON

LIBERIA

LIBYA

LIECHTENSTEIN

LUXEMBOURG

MALAGASAY

MALAYSIA

MALI

MEXICO

   

1

MONACO

MONGOLIA

MOROCCO

NEPAL

NETHERLANDS

3

2

NETHERLANDS ANTILLES

NEW ZEALAND

2

 

2

NIGER

NIGERIA

NORTHERN RHODESIA

NORTH KOREA

NORWAY

1

 

1

PAKISTAN

 

1

PANAMA

PERU

PHILIPPINES

   

1

POLAND

5

12

6

PORTUGAL

PUERTO RICO

   

1

RHODESIA

 

1

RUMANIA

1

3

3

SENEGAL

SOUTH KOREA

 

1

SPAIN

SWEDEN

1

1

2

SWITZERLAND

 

3

2

TANGANYIKA

THAILAND

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

1

1

TUNISIA

TURKEY

6

3

4

UNITED ARAB REPUBLIC

UGANDA

URUGUAY

U.S.A.

35

29

33

U.S.S.R.

41

28

25

VENEZUELA

VIETNAM

YUGOSLAVIA

1

2

3

America has won more medals (469 golds, 1,078 in all)than any other country during the 14 previous summer Olympics. Closest to theU.S. are Great Britain (130 and 445), Sweden (115 and 375), Germany (98 and343) and France (111 and 331). Sixth is the Soviet Union (102 and 277), but allbut seven of its medals have been won since 1952, when the Russians returned toOlympic competition after a lapse of 40 years. Since 1952 Russia, with 270medals, and the U.S., with 221, have dominated the Olympics. The form chartabove, a synthesis of expert opinion, says this will continue. But there aresigns that a third force—the smaller nations—will have more and more say aboutmedal distribution. In 1960 in Rome the Russians and Americans together won 77golds to 75 for the other countries, but only 50 silvers to 99 and 47 bronzesto 113. In men's track the other countries won 10 gold medals to America's 9and Russia's 5, and they had 37 medals overall to America's 22 and Russia's 13.In Tokyo, where the host country, for example, can be expected to do very well,the uprising will spread.

THREE ILLUSTRATIONS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)