A MISTY HAVEN FOR SPORTSMEN

May 16, 1965

For the casual tourist Scotland can be a melancholy place, its beauties cloaked in subtleties, its entertainments no more stimulating than tea with milk. But Scotland for fishing, or Scotland for golf, or Scotland for shooting—there is something else again. Who needs a nightclub after a day on the River Dee, and what matter if the mist hangs low on the Old Course of St. Andrews? Becoming involved in the life of a country is the secret of the happy traveler, and sport is the means of involvement in Scotland. There was a time when the best of it was the private preserve of the landed Scot or Englishman, or the American tycoon of J. P. Morgan's era for whom a stretch of salmon river and a grouse moor were as important as a yacht. But today the streams, the moors, the links are open to thousands of Americans who come north of the Tweed with golf clubs, tackle and guns in their luggage. Whether the cost is 10 shillings for a round of golf or 250 guineas for a week of shooting in Edwardian luxury, the sport they buy is memorable indeed, as the following pages show.

Captain Alwyne Farquharson shows Mary Louise Lincoln of Connecticut how to cast for salmon on the Dee.

Hugh McGregor, a pioneer of the pony-trekking idea, leads a group of vacationers from England, Ireland, Scotland, Australia and the U.S. on a day's outing from the Highland village of Aberfoyle into the beautiful Trossach hills.

For visiting Americans, golf is Scotland's glory. Sugar Ray Robinson (above) joins three Scots for a round at St. Andrews, while a golf-tour group from New Jersey's Areola Country Club (below) practices on the velvet greens of Gleneagles.

FOUR PHOTOSPETER BEARD

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)