YANKEE YUKS
Sirs:
As an avid Met fan I had until now steadfastly adhered to the axiom set forth by all advocates of Metsomania, i.e., hate the Yankees. Having read Jack Mann's article, A New Comic Act in New York (May 3), my animosity toward the once mighty team of mammoth immortals has been lessened considerably. Mr. Mann's article on the Yankees parallels Charles Beard's historical work on the signers of our Constitution, in which Beard most successfully and empathetically humanized the Founding Fathers.
TIMOTHY H. BARRON
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Sirs:
Is this an attempt to present the Yankees in a new, more sympathetic light? A leopard doesn't change its spots. I wonder how the comic touch will be regarded at the end of this season.
DAVID HART
Cambridge, Mass.

Sirs:
These Yankee clowns certainly do not resemble their illustrious predecessors, who would be in hiding after dogging it in two consecutive World Series.
BEN CURLOU
New York City

WHITE HOPE
Sirs:
Along with your coverage of the Kentucky Derby and its sentimental favorite, Bold Lad, I feel you should have given a little space to another sentimental favorite, the history-making pure-white 2-year-old filly named White Beauty, whom you mentioned in your SCORECARD section last November 2.

White Beauty, probably the first all-white Thoroughbred ever to race, won the fourth at Keeneland in her third start on April 22 under the superb guidance of Jockey Ken Knapp.
H. E. GASTLE, M.D.
Lakefield, Ont.

•In her other two starts at Keeneland, White Beauty finished ninth and third. In her fourth race, the Debutante Stakes at Churchill Downs on Derby Day (see right), the white charmer came in seventh in a 10-horse field.—ED.

NOT-SO-SOFT AMERICANS
Sirs:
In the light of your continuing interest in the President's physical-fitness program and in answer to the many detractors who have slighted and slandered our teen-agers, I thought you might be interested in a firsthand account of one physical challenge that was successfully met. In the face of the most devastating Mississippi River flood in history, the teen-agers from our area, grade school through college, put on the greatest display of physical endurance, selflessness, teamwork and sheer guts it has been my privilege to witness. They toiled countless hours in the cold and rain, constantly threatened with injury or loss of life. Time and again they beat back the fury of the river. They suffered their discomforts with laughs and ignored their aches and bruises.

I am sure that this situation was duplicated many, many times in the other river communities affected by the flood. Don't worry about this generation of "soft-living," "soft-bellied" teeners. They pulled us through this emergency and will continue to do battle and survive the legacy of trouble with which we burden them.
WILLIAM D. TIERNAN
Moline, Ill.

JENKINS' JOKERS
Sirs:
The piece by Dan Jenkins (You're Nobody Till Somebody Hates You, May 3) was something else. I'm with you, Dan. My current strategy involves a bold advance to the rear (entirely different from a retreat, suh) from Arnie's Army, Jack's Pack and Lema's Legion.

Problem is, shall I re-enlist in Zarley's Zealots, Yancey's Banshees, Weaver's Believers, Dill's Escadrille, Kneece's Meeces, Beard's Band, Martindale's Nightingales, Glover's Gang, McGowan's Clowns, Hart's Upstarts or Archer's Marchers?

Sign me quick, Sarge. Issue full field pack and plenty of foot powder.
ELLIS D. ROBERTS
Cleveland

Sirs:
I expect Dan Jenkins will have to wait a few years for Medicine Hat golfers to appear on the pro tour. After all, we still play on prairie wool, instead of seeded fairways. We discarded sand greens a few years back, but it is doubtful whether our greens will compare with those at Muleshoe.

Pros no! Ardent golfers yes!
LEN FLYNN
Medicine Hat, Alta.

THE REIGN IN BOSTON
Sirs:
Your article concerning the playoff between Boston and Los Angeles was very confusing (The Playoff Was Child's Play, May 3). I could not tell whether Mr. Deford was feeling sorry for Los Angeles or whether he considered that Boston was just lucky. In any case, he failed to give credit where it was due: to the late owner, Walter Brown, Coach Red Auerbach, the great Boston crowd, and most of all to the Boston players themselves. This team has had the longest reign in sports history. Anyone watching the game that Sunday would have to agree that they are the greatest team ever. I think that it rains indoors for Mr. Deford.
WAYNE ELIAS
Fairfield, Iowa

Sirs:
It could be I am chauvinistic, but I think Frank Deford needs a technical foul called on him. The implication is that the Celtics swamped the Lakers because Los Angeles was depleted by injuries. If memory serves me correctly, Boston's season record was 7-3 (four wins in Los Angeles) against a healthy Laker squad. There can be no question about Jerry West's offensive brilliance, but it seems that Mr. Deford dribbled around Sam Jones's superb all-round performance. He talks mainly about the Celtics' Russell-led defense, which almost everyone recognizes as nonpareil. However, teams win games by putting the ball through the hoop and, therefore, it should be mentioned that during this series they won the first game by the largest score ever attained in playoff history. And, furthermore, they won the deciding fifth game by one of the biggest point spreads ever. As a matter of fact, at one stretch in the fifth game the Celtics ran off 20 straight points to the opposition's zero.

Mr. Deford concludes by stating that it never seems to rain indoors for Red Auerbach & Co. Nevertheless, long may they reign!
LOU STERNBURG
Newton Centre, Mass.

Sirs:
The sports fans of this area of New England are proud of the Boston Celtics. We finally have a winning team, and that means something. Before Mr. Deford goes stepping on other people's toes, he had better take a long look at his beloved city of New York. When he begins to "cry" and become upset about the long reign of the Yankees, then and only then can he spread a little "wisdom" in our neighborhood.
JOHN HUSSEY
Barrington, R.I.

TRIPLE PLAY
Sirs:
We at Kent State University were delighted to see your SCORECARD mention of our newest celebrity, the son of Jimmie Foxx (April 19). However, I would like to call your attention to an inadvertent error.

The boy's correct name is James Emory Foxx III, not II. In this case, the significance of young Jimmie's full name has not gone unnoticed at Kent State. Everybody knows his slugging dad was called Double X in his big-league heyday with the A's and Red Sox. Hence, we've dubbed his handsome scion Triple X. This accentuates the importance of labeling him James Emory Foxx III.
JIM CARFIELD
Kent, Ohio

•There are two second-generation claimants to the Double X throne. Jimmie Foxx Sr. married twice, and has a son by each marriage, both named after him. Thus the elder son became James Emory Foxx Jr., the younger (Kent State's Triple X), James Emory Foxx III.—ED.

PHOTO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)