BASEBALL'S WEEK

July 04, 1965

AMERICAN LEAGUE
At times only two games separated first place from fifth. Still in the thick of it was CLEVELAND (5-2), which a month earlier had been sixth. Since then the Indians have played .758 ball, and although their winning streak ended at 10 they remained a close second place on clutch hits by Chuck Hinton (game-winning homers in the 10th and 15th innings), Rocky Colavito and Max Alvis. And home attendance was up 100,000. MINNESOTA (4-3) finished three full weeks of play against nothing but first-division contenders with a 11-11 record. The Twins clung to first place by winning once on an infield squibbler, later on a foul-pole homer. Until this year Pitcher Hank Aguirre of DETROIT (3-4) was almost a legendary nonhitter. His lifetime average was .077. Last week, though, he hit in his third straight game and raised his average to .375. Aguirre also drove in the winning run for what was his fifth straight victory. Juan Pizarro, a 19-game winner for CHICAGO (4-2) a year ago who could not get by the sixth inning this year, was put on the disabled list with a bad shoulder. Milt Pappas of BALTIMORE (4-4) was given assorted gifts—one of them a plaque from the Maryland Penitentiary Fan Club—for having won his 100th game earlier in the season. Robin Roberts lost his seventh in a row. There were actually two separate races going on, with NEW YORK (5-2) finally on top of the second cluster of five clubs. Yankee Pitching Coach Cot Deal and Catcher Elston Howard tried to get Al Downing to waste less time between pitches. Downing stopped fiddling and with a little relief help pitched a three-hitter. Left-hander George Brunet's three-hit shutout against the Tigers was the only LOS ANGELES (1-5) win in a 10-game stretch. WASHINGTON'S (2-4) Pete Richert kept up his strong pitching. During the past 50 innings he had an 0.90 ERA and gave up only 24 hits. Carl Yastrzemski of BOSTON (4-4) went 17 for 32 and moved up to second in the batting race. Pitchers Roland Sheldon and Don Mossi helped KANSAS CITY (3-5) salvage three wins.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
"A good timber never grows with ease; it needs a strong wind and storms to give it strength."—From Words to Live By, a notebook of inspirational helps compiled by PITTSBURGH (4-2) Pitcher Vernon Law. The last four seasons were filled with wind and storms for Law, but he has grown stronger and is again one of the best pitchers extant. He was regarded as such in 1960 when he won 22 games, including two in the World Series. But during the Series he suffered a severe ankle injury, and that was followed by a shoulder tear in 1961. In 1963 he went down to the minors and later that season voluntarily retired from baseball. He came out of retirement in 1964 and began to pitch well again, but hardly anyone noticed his 12-13 record last year. This spring he lost his first five starts, principally because of weak hitting and woeful fielding by his teammates. At that point Law, a Mormon elder, must have known how Job felt when Satan tested him. Since then, however, Law has bedeviled opposing hitters. He won eight straight games (including three shutouts), held opposing hitters to a combined batting average of .143 and had a 1.59 ERA, best in the league. Last week he blanked the Giants on four hits and squelched the league-leading Dodgers 6-1 on three singles; he also had a three-run homer and three singles. Law's teammate, Willie Stargell, had five home runs during the week, including three in one game against the Dodgers. Stargell had 20 homers for the season, 17 of them on the road. The LOS ANGELES (2-4) offense was whisper-quiet (.184 BA). Hard-luck Claude Osteen pitched a two-hitter and lost to the Mets 1-0. HOUSTON (5-1) had lost 13 of 16 when NEW YORK (1-5) arrived at the Astrodome. The Astros promptly ran off four straight wins. "The only thing wrong with the Mets," said Houston Vice-President George Kirksey, "is that we don't play them enough." After Wade Blasingame of MILWAUKEE (2-5) won a four-hitter, Billy Williams of the Cubs said, "I don't care if he is only 21, he pitches a lot like Spahn." Catcher Joe Torre flubbed a foul third strike that gave Don Pavletich of CINCINNATI (6-2) another chance, and Pavletich hit a game-winning homer. Pitcher Sammy Ellis of the Reds left the ball park after being knocked out of the box in the first game of a doubleheader. At home he found a stern message ordering him back to the park. He relieved late in the second game, retired the one batter he faced and got credit for the victory. Six days later, he went 11 innings to beat Milwaukee for his 12th win. Larry Jackson of CHICAGO (4-3), last year's top winner in the majors when he was 24-11, was drubbed by the Braves and is a top loser (4-10) this year. Two ST. LOUIS (3-5) players were fined for not being alert, and General Manager Bob Howsam criticized the club for lacking confidence. Howsam also said that Manager Red Schoendienst had to get tougher. Bob Gibson (9-6) broke his losing streak with a shutout over the Cubs. PHILADELPHIA (3-3) Manager Gene Mauch had advised faltering Reliever Jack Baldschun not to throw his screwball. Baldschun complied for a time but last week, using the screwball again, he was hit hard. "I've pitched my way for the last five games," said Baldschun, "and that was my first bad one." Replied Mauch: "He's full of beans." Mauch also urged Bo Belinsky to forget about his screwball, which seemed fitting. Bo could not resist trying a few (one was a wild pitch), but he struck out 10 and beat the Astros 7-1. Mauch, who had a lot of trouble with pitchers during the week, stopped a game with SAN FRANCISCO (3-3) 13 times to demand an inspection of Bob Shaw's "spitball." The umpires found Shaw guiltless, and he went on to pitch a one-hitter; the one hit was a home run by Wes Covington.

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PHOTOPLAYER OF THE WEEK: VERNON LAW

LEADING ROOKIES*

BATTING

AB

HR

RBI

BA

Blefary, Orioles

151

9

30

.278

Cardenal, Angels

271

7

29

.266

Morgan, Astros

275

3

14

.251

Swoboda, Mets

180

13

30

.250

Perez, Reds

112

4

20

.241

Beckert, Cubs

288

1

10

.236

Schaal, Angels

223

9

26

.215

Berry, White Sox

183

3

12

.208

Northrup, Tigers

113

2

12

.204

Petrocelli, Red Sox

114

2

8

.202

PITCHING

IP

W

L

ERA

Linzy, Giants

27

2

0

1.33

Wagner, Phillies

40

2

2

2.70

Boswell, Twins

61

4

3

2.80

Lopez, Angels

107

7

7

2.83

Palmer, Orioles

55

2

2

2.95

May, Angels

84

4

7

3.11

Lonborg, Red Sox

83

4

7

3.25

Howard, White Sox

60

3

4

3.75

Fosnow, Twins

38

2

3

3.79

Kroll, Mets

55

3

5

4.58

*through June 26

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)