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Backdoor entry to center stage

Nov. 01, 1965
Nov. 01, 1965

Table of Contents
Nov. 1, 1965

Leap For The Roses
The Cardinals
Football's Week
  • While defense took a holiday, a lot of big games that should have been close were turned into a shambles by a horde of smashing runners who picked this weekend to finally catch up with the brilliant passing that had previously distinguished the season. Foremost among the runners were Floyd Little of Syracuse, Roy Shivers of Utah State, Harry Jones of Arkansas, Mel Farr of UCLA and Idaho's Ray McDonald, but none had a more violent impact on the score—or his own team's prestige—than Notre Dame's Fullback Larry Conjar (right), who bruised his way to four touchdowns as the Irish obliterated Southern Cal

Sailing School
People
Baseball
  • Seven years ago the author eavesdropped on a secret session of club owners considering major league expansion. Here he reveals how a colleague pulled the same trick on the same people as they bumbled through aimless gab about a new commissioner. Only Walter O'Malley seemed to know what he was doing

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

Backdoor entry to center stage

For the first time in 13 years a country other than Italy, Great Britain or France will represent Europe in the World Championship team matches when the 1966 Bermuda Bowl event is played in St. Vincent, Italy next May. Previously Sweden, in 1953, and Sweden-Iceland, in 1950, were the only teams to break the bridge monopoly of Europe's big three. Now Holland has qualified for the championship matches.

This is an article from the Nov. 1, 1965 issue Original Layout

The Netherlands team made its way into the World Championship event by the back door. The Dutch failed to win the European Championship in Ostend, finishing second to Italy, which took the title even though the Italians fielded an experimental team. But since Italy, as defending World Champion, had already clinched a place in the Bermuda Bowl, Europe's place went to the runner-up, Holland's six-man team of Blitzblum-Rijke, Kreyns-Slavenburg and Boender-Oudshoorn.

For a while it seemed that no one wanted to win the European title. France, the pretournament favorite since both Britain and Italy fielded makeshift lineups, held the lead briefly after three rounds of play. But the Dutchmen, who had indicated they might be dangerous by shutting out Italy 6-0 in the second round, blitzed both France and Poland the next day and took over the lead after the fifth round. They couldn't hold it. In the next four matches the Dutch won only once and fell into a fourth-place tie with the Italians as Great Britain took over the lead. Then they recovered, scoring four successive shutouts to wrap up second place behind Italy, which had staged a late rally of its own to finish in first place.

This week's hand helped the Dutch crush favored Poland. Look at only the North and East cards.

I have reconstructed the bidding as it might have gone; my records of the match state only that South reached three no trump at both tables and both West players opened the 10 of spades. How would you have defended if you were East?

The Polish East won the trick with the spade ace. South dropped the jack, and East continued spades. South won and cleared clubs. The defenders collected two more spade tricks, but these were not enough to stop the game, and as soon as declarer got the lead he had the rest.

Cornelis Slavenburg, playing East for Holland, stopped to figure that his side could not win more than three tricks in the spade suit. Even if South had started with queen-jack alone, North's 6 of spades would furnish a fourth-round stopper. So, instead of blindly continuing spades, East shifted to a low heart. (The heart 10 would have been still better.) South could not win this trick without setting up more heart losers than he could afford. When he ducked, West won with the queen. With one heart trick home, West could afford to shift back to spades, knocking out South's King. Declarer had no chance with out establishing the club suit, and when he led a club, East grabbed the ace and led a spade to give his partner the setting tricks.

The Dutch players do not play any complex systems, but they are aggressive bidders whose preemptive tactics can upset even the toughest opponents, as indeed they did in the European Championships.

North dealer East-West vulnerable

NORTH

[6 of Spades]
[5 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[9 of Hearts]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[9 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]
[Queen of Clubs]
[Jack of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[4 of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]

WEST

[Queen of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[9 of Spades]
[2 of Spades]
[Queen of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]
[7 of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[10 of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]
[3 of Clubs]

SOUTH

[King of Spades]
[Jack of Spades]
[Ace of Hearts]
[Jack of Hearts]
[6 of Hearts]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[King of Diamonds]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[4 of Diamonds]
[King of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]

EAST

[Ace of Spades]
[8 of Spades]
[7 of Spades]
[King of Hearts]
[10 of Hearts]
[5 of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[7 of Diamonds]
[5 of Diamonds]
[Ace of Clubs]
[10 of Clubs]
[5 of Clubs]

NORTH
(Wilkosz)

PASS
2 [Club]
PASS

EAST
(Slavenburg)

PASS
PASS
PASS

SOUTH
(Kuklewicz)

1 [Club]
3 N.T.

WEST
(Kreyns)

PASS
PASS

Opening lead: 10 of spades