BASEBALL'S WEEK

May 01, 1966

AMERICAN LEAGUE

"We can't run, we can't hit, we can't bunt and we can't catch a pop fly," said BOSTON (2-2) Manager Billy Herman. His only solace came when Dave Morehead and Ken Sanders combined to shut out the Tigers 7-0 and when Jerry Stephenson won 5-3 the next day. Stephenson got assists from Trainer Buddy LeRoux, who provided him with enzyme pills and a portable whirlpool, and from Reliefer Dick Radatz. Deep down, though, Stephenson felt it was his hair that helped most. Last winter he let it grow and grow and grow, and even though Herman made him trim it, Stephenson says, à la Samson, that "I firmly believe that letting my hair grow helped bring my elbow back into shape." The Red Sox pulled off a triple play, but for the most part played more like Delilahs than Samsons. Ken McMullen of WASHINGTON (1-4) was hardly hampered at all by a dislocated thumb, thanks to Trainer Tom McKenna, who quickly went to work with a roll of tape. Instead of applying the tape to the thumb, McKenna wound it around the handle of McMullen's bat. McMullen, able to rest his thumb on the tape, swung without pain and hit .333 for the week. But all the tape in the training room could not keep the Senators from making a rash of bad plays, particularly in a 14-8 loss to BALTIMORE (4-0). Frank Robinson's right shoulder hurt "more than it has in 10 years," and the Oriole outfielder had to relay his throws via the second baseman. The shoulder did not hinder Frank's hitting (7 for 13). And sidekick Brooks Robinson went 7 for 16. The zesty hitting (.296 team BA and 12 doubles) was complemented by impressive relief pitching (six hits and one earned run in 8⅔ innings). CLEVELAND (3-0), on timely hits by Fred Whitfield (below) and Vic Davalillo and Ex-relief Pitcher Gary Bell's first complete-game win in four years, remained undefeated. Manager Johnny Keane of NEW YORK (0-4) realigned his team by shifting Tom Tresh from left field to third base and Clete Boyer from third to shortstop. But the Yankee hitting was still futile, and the club lost four games by a total of five runs. Weak hitting did not bother Catfish Hunter of KANSAS CITY (2-1). The night before he expects to pitch Hunter eats fish. By the time he got to the mound last week, after two rainouts, he was fortified with enough protein to hold off the White Sox 2-1. CALIFORNIA (3-3) lost two of its first three games in its new $24-million Anaheim playground. Worse, it took an hour one night to get the lights to work. But from then on, all was well. With home runs by Bobby Knoop and Jack Warner and fine relief work by Bob Lee the Angels beat the Twins twice. With help from Mickey Mouse, Goofy and 3,000 pigeons, the Angels lured 37,221 fans for a Saturday game. Three DETROIT (3-3) starters failed to last beyond the second inning, and only a strong relief job by Larry Sherry enabled Denny McLain, who lasted 7⅔ innings, to pick up a win. MINNESOTA (1-3) Right Fielder Tony Oliva had one fly ball glance off his glove and hit him over the eye and another one strike him on the chest. The two errors gave the A's a 3-2 win. Manager Eddie Stanky of CHICAGO (3-2), one of the game's leading practitioners of Deep Think, was having second thoughts about his own strategy. With Joe Adcock of the Angels up in the 11th inning, with two men on, Stanky had Second Baseman Don Buford play in short center field. Adcock singled in the winning run by pushing the ball right through the spot where Buford would normally have played. What little offense the White Sox mustered centered around Tommy Agee, who hit .400 and scored eight runs, five in one game.

Standings: Clev 7-0, Balt 8-1, Det 8-4, Chi 6-3, Cal 6-4, Minn 4-5, KC 2-6, Wash 2-7, Bos 2-7, NY 1-9

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Whatever Bobby Bragan, the ATLANTA (6-1) manager wanted, Bobby Bragan got. When he needed help from the bullpen he got it from Clay Carroll, Phil Niekro, Chi Chi Olivo and Billy O'Dell. When he needed the long ball he got a pair of home runs from Joe Torre in one game, two more from Hank Aaron in another. Aaron's second homer was the 400th of his career. And when Bragan needed some luck he got it in the form of a figure-8 bunt by Pitcher Wade Blasingame, which landed fair, rolled foul, then curved again fair for a hit. It was the key hit in a 3-1 win against the Phillies. Things were going so well that Denis Menke even turned a strikeout into a win. He argued that a pitch that had been called a foul-tip third strike had actually hit him on the hand and, presto, while the umpire looked on, up popped a telltale bruise mark. Menke went to first, then scored a run in a 5-4 victory over the Mets. The euphoria in which NEW YORK (1-5) found itself at the start of the week—the Mets were then in fifth place—ended abruptly. The downfall came about partly because of seven errors and partly because the starting pitchers gave up 22 runs in 25 innings. PHILADELPHIA (1-4) had 17 hits in its lone win, a 9-7 defeat of the Reds, but for the rest of the week the Phillies batted .185. CHICAGO (2-3) traded Pitchers Larry Jackson and Bob Buhl to the Phils and got a quick dividend from one of the three players received in return. Newcomer Ferguson Jenkins pitched 5‚Öì innings of scoreless relief and drove in two runs to beat the Dodgers 2-0. The next day rookie Ken Holtz-man, with relief from Ted Abernathy, also stopped the Dodgers 2-0. HOUSTON (3-4), too, got back-to-back shutouts—from Dave Giusti and Barry Latman—to beat the Giants 2-0 and 4-0. SAN FRANCISCO (4-2) was on the verge of a third loss to the Astros when Willie Mays started a game-winning rally with his fourth homer of the week. It was the 511th career home run for Mays, tying Mel Ott's NL record. PITTSBURGH (5-2, page 34) won four one-run games, and in the clubhouse the Pirates entertained themselves by listening to a recording called Going Places. The only place ST. LOUIS (4-1) wanted to go was to its new stadium, a move it will make on May 12. For years the Cardinals have been haunted by opponents' homers in ancient Busch Stadium, and last week the Pirates hit five there in two nights. Yet Curt Flood won two games for the Cards with home runs, the first with a man on and two out in the ninth for a 5-4 win against the Mets, the next with two on to beat the Pirates 7-5. LOS ANGELES (3-3) Pitcher Sandy Koufax was able to beat the Cubs 2-1, because, for the first time this season, "when I reached back for a little extra it was there." That has to be the worst news of the month for NL hitters. The rain in Spain may stay mainly on the plain, but in CINCINNATI (1-5) it stayed mostly around Crosley Field. It held off long enough for the Reds to play, at long last, their home opener, which had been washed out three times, and just long enough for them to end their six-game losing streak with a rain-shortened, six-inning 3-2 win against the Phillies.

Standings: SF 9-3, Pitt 9-3, Atl 7-5, LA 7-5, Phil 5-5, StL 5-5, Hou 5-8, NY 3-6, Chi 3-8, Cin 2-7

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PHOTOINDIANS' FRED WHITFIELD

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Fred Whitfield of the Cleveland Indians speaks in a voice rich with hominy grits, and he strums a lazy guitar—an easygoing man if ever there was one. It's just that he has this thing about the Yankees. He can't stop hitting against them. It has become almost a disease, and there seems to be nothing that medical science—or the Yankee pitchers—can do about it. Whitfield first showed these symptoms on May 4 a year ago when he hit a three-run homer against New York. The next day he did it again—another three-run homer. By the end of the season Whitfield had hit Yankee pitching for 10 home runs and 26 RBIs and had batted .358 against them. Had he kept up that pace against the rest of the league, Whitfield would have ended up with 90 home runs and 234 RBIs. His Yankee malady was diagnosed as temporary, something that, with time, would go away. But when Whitfield faced New York for the first time this year, there it was again—a game-winning, two-run homer. Next day—certainly—he did exactly the same thing. "I give up," said Manager Johnny Keane of the Yankees. Whitfield himself feels that maybe it's his guitar playing that does it. "Strummin' with one hand and fingerin' with the other is good for the wrists and hands, and strong wrists and hands are important to hittin'," Whitfield says. "The good Lord gave me the ability to hit. That's all I can do. Otherwise I'd be plantin' crops back home in Alabama."

TEAM LEADERS: BATTING*

BA

TB

RBI

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pitt

Stargell

.375

Alou Stragell

26

Stargell

10

SF

Hart

.450

Mays

33

Mays

14

LA

Parker

.350

Lefebvre

26

Lefebvre

9

Atl

Alou

.357

Torre

26

Torre

7

Phil

Allen

.389

Allen

25

Allen

8

StL

Smith

.471

Smith

25

Flood

12

Hou

Morgan

.349

Morgan

22

Staub

9

NY

Boyer

.333

Boyer Kranepool

15

Kranepool

7

Chi

Santo

.355

Santo

16

Hundley

5

Cin

Cardenas

.345

Pinson

16

Helms

5

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Clev

Alvis

.406

Alvis

17

Alvis

6

Balt

F. Robinson

.444

F. Robinson

27

B. Robinson

14

Cal

Warner

.345

Warner

21

Warner

7

Chi

Robinson

.433

Robinson

20

Robinson

7

Det

Kaline

.324

Kaline

23

Horton

7

Minn

Oliva

.429

Oliva

25

Oliva

8

Wash

Mc Mullen

.333

McMullen

19

McMullen

7

KC

Hershberger Causey

.333

Hershberger

12

Bryan Hershberger

2

Bos

Scott

.276

Yastrzemski

17

Yastrzemski

7

NY

Richardson Pepitone

.286

Pepitone

17

Boyer

5

*through April 23

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)