BASEBALL'S WEEK

May 08, 1966

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Cleveland (4-1) Manager Birdie Tebbetts, a man of subtle superstitions, got the chance to get his hair cut when the Indians finally lost a game after opening the season with 10 straight wins, tying a major league record. But then Sam McDowell pitched his second consecutive one-hitter, and Birdie may begin ignoring barber chairs all over again. BALTIMORE (4-0) was in the lead, doing more than what Manager Hank Bauer wanted. "I like to crucify those second-division clubs," he said, "and hold my own against the contenders." The Orioles crucified Detroit, decidedly first division, and walloped five home runs in the process. Frank Robinson and Boog Powell got theirs in the first Tiger game, rookie Dave Johnson had two and Curt Blefary another in the second. Eddie Stanky was shocked when he phoned the CHICAGO (4-1) clubhouse from his flu bed. "This is Eddie," he told fill-in Manager Tony Cuccinello. "Eddie who?" came the reply, and Stanky hustled back to work. If he recuperates it will be the bullpen that is responsible. Eddie Fisher has saved four games, rookie Dennis Higgins has given up two earned runs in 11‚Öì innings and Bob Locker nothing in 13‚Öì innings. Defending champion MINNESOTA (1-2), shut out by Detroit, frozen out one day and rained out four more, was not sure whether it was the pennant or a skiing or swimming championship it was defending. DETROIT (2-3) got an exciting shutout from Pitcher Dennis McLain, then further excitement against the Athletics when Al Kaline stole a base with his team leading 13-5. "That's nice," said A's Manager Al Dark. "Do you always steal with an eight-run lead?" Only, a player said, when a spitball is thrown at him. Dark, no doubt, was the more irked because those five runs represented a bonanza for KANSAS CITY (1-5). In three games his A's came up with nothing, in another, one run. Luckily that was all Roland Sheldon needed as he shut out his old NEW YORK (3-3) teammates. The Yanks are still a sick team, but on a diet of Missouri mule they are beginning to show some life. For those who thought he had lost the knack, Roger Maris hit a home run—his first—as the Yanks scored 10 runs on the Athletics. "Those two youngsters [meaning Jackie Warner and Rick Reichardt] make me think something is going to happen in every game," said CALIFORNIA (2-3) Manager Bill Rigney. The Angels were down six runs to the Red Sox going into the eighth when Zok and Pow and the whole Angel lineup went berserk. Warner drove in two runs, Reichardt hit homers five and six and 12 runs crossed the plate. WASHINGTON (2-3) needed a dozen tries before getting a complete game from a pitcher. When it came, Mike McCormick's shutout of the Yankees was a dandy. "How's it feel to be the ace?" a teammate asked him on the team bus. McCormick responded, "Wait a couple of weeks. I might be driving this thing." BOSTON (2-4) got the usual home runs and Manager Billy Herman, as usual, shuttled fresh pitchers in (he used 17 in four games) as opposing batters shuttled them out.

Standings: Bait 12-1, Clev 11-1, Chi 10-4, Det 10-7, Cal 8-7, Minn 5-7, Wash 4-10, Bos 4-11, NY 4-12, KC 3-11

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Houston (5-1), wallowing in an embarrassment of good pitchers, certainly will not cut Dave Giusti, whose three-hitter against the Cardinals was his second straight strong game. Overstaffed Manager Grady Hatton probably would prefer to lop off a base runner or so. Two Astros were picked off base and two more were caught stealing, but even they could not slow an attack that saw Rusty Staub start a ninth-inning rally by striking out. The pitch got by Brave Catcher Gene Oliver, and John Bateman singled Staub home one out later, SAN FRANCISCO (3-4) quite possibly will not survive home-run No. 512—the one with which Willie Mays will break the National League record. A huge "512" cake was delivered to Candlestick Park on Monday, and the club has grown stale waiting for Willie to eat it. Something he did eat caused him to miss a game, but the worst Giant stomach belongs to Manager Herman Franks, who sat through tasteless performances by Pitchers Frank Linzy, Lindy McDaniel and Bob Shaw. PHILADELPHIA'S (3-1) Richie Allen dove back into second base and did not get up. "I hope it isn't as bad as I think," Manager Gene Mauch said. It wasn't. Allen will be out for only a week. In the meantime there are Dick Groat, who filled in with four hits the next night, and Mauch's two-man rainy day rotation—Chris Short and Jim Bunning. Not as catchy as "Spahn, Sain and a day of..." but just as effective. The problems with playing LOS ANGELES (5-2) used to be three: Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale and Claude Osteen. With Don Sutton there are now four. The Big Three pitchers won impressively, but Sutton's five-hit, 10-strikeout effort against the Braves was the best of them all. CINCINNATI (2-4) Outfielder Vada Pinson had another one of those four-for-four days, and it won a game. Rookie Tommy Helms's single won another, beating Koufax, no less, but if you think Manager Don Heffner is all smiles you err. Nobody else is hitting, and best Pitcher Jim Maloney is hurting. PITTSBURGH (2-2) thought it had a patent on last-minute uprisings, then the Mets beat them with four runs in the 11th. Roberto Clemente and associates put a quick stop to that nonsense, belting seven assorted triples and doubles the next time they played, NEW YORK (2-1) Acting Manager Yogi Berra sent up pinch-hitter Chuck Hiller, a left-hander, against the Pirates' left-handed Luke Walker, raising eyebrows. "That's all we had," Berra said, and that was plenty: Hiller hit a two-run single. Just like that the Mets were flirting with .500 again. "Youth and speed!" yelled CHICAGO (1-4) Manager Leo Durocher. "That's my kind of ball club." The Cubs had just won a couple. Then Leo's kind of team lost four straight, giving up 40 runs. It was most unusual, the way ATLANTA'S (3-4) Hank Aaron was being pushed around, but for those who thought it would last—whack. And then whack, whack, whack! Hank had four more home runs, eight all told. With Felipe Alou helping lustily and Ken Johnson throwing a three-hitter at the Giants the Braves managed to stay close to the lead. ST. LOUIS (2-5) easily heads the league in disgruntled pitchers. "We're rusting away," said Curt Simmons. So were the batters. Alex Johnson cracked six hits in two games, but the Cardinals could manage only six runs while losing four games.

Standings: Pitt 11-5, LA 12-7, SF 12-7, Phil 8-6, Atl 10-9, Hou 10-9, NY 5-7, StL 7-10, Cin 4-11, Chi 4-12

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CLUB STATISTICS*

HR

OPP. HR

SB

THROWN OUT

DP

E

ERA

NATIONAL LEAGUE

PITT

14

14

10

5

19

15

3.60

PHIL

9

9

6

3

9

5

3.03

LA

10

9

17

7

9

18

2.15

SF

19

16

2

3

7

13

2.98

ATL

23

13

6

4

13

15

2.89

HOU

14

17

15

8

20

18

3.03

NY

8

9

6

1

15

15

3.86

STL

10

13

16

5

15

20

3.13

CIN

7

9

7

3

7

6

3.84

CHI

12

17

6

3

12

20

5.36

AMERICAN LEAGUE

BALT

22

8

6

3

12

6

2.65

CLEV

9

6

8

4

8

10

1.92

CHI

8

8

17

9

8

9

2.00

DET

18

18

9

4

16

8

3.45

CAL

18

15

8

7

15

11

3.20

MINN

8

9

3

4

6

10

2.62

WASH

11

15

1

2

12

9

4.24

BOS

9

16

2

2

19

17

5.20

NY

10

9

7

2

15

16

3.54

KC

1

10

5

5

14

17

3.84

*through April 30

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)