19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

May 14, 1967

UNIDENTICAL TWINS
Sirs:
Congratulations to Joe Jares for an outstanding article about our weird Twins. (Poor Sam—What a Weird Week, May 1). I can't remember reading a wittier or more interesting article in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.
JOHN ELLSWORTH
Minneapolis

Sirs:
A great article! I laughed and cried. This would be a good article for any Little League player to read—or for anyone else who is interested in playing good baseball. I just hope the Twins' bad luck has run out and that good luck will follow for the rest of the season.
LARRY NEAHUSAN
Midland, Texas

Sirs:
Your mention of Walter Johnson in an article on the Minnesota Twins was hardly appropriate. As everyone well knows, when Calvin Griffith ran off with our ball club he did not take the club records with him. Walter Johnson would have been surprised indeed to find himself "reincarnated" with the word Twins on his chest. In the future when reincarnating old Senators, how about using a Washington uniform? Let the Twins find their own heroes.
BRIAN J. BARRY
Annapolis, Md.

Sirs:
The Minnesota Twins may be down, but they are a long, long way from being out. I have been an avid Twin fan since they entered the league, and I've got news for a few people. Minneapolis and St. Paul are large, prosperous, modern cities. They have a few residents who are not Swedish, and there are far better things to do there than watch TV. One thing is to watch the Twins play at their beautiful stadium in Bloomington.

I thank you for your sympathy for Sam Mele and all Twin fans, but in October, when the Series opens up in the Twin Cities, we'll see just who is feeling sorry for whom.
JOHN STITES
Des Moines

JOLTIN' JOE
Sirs:
It was with much disgust and disappointment that I read Joe DiMaggio's explanation as to why he was at the racetrack instead of at the San Francisco Giants' home opener (SCORECARD, May 1). His statement that baseball is too dull and doesn't interest him anymore seemed to be very much out of place. I would like to remind Mr. DiMaggio that it was the dull game of baseball that made it possible for him to have the money to go to the racetrack.
TERRY SCHERMAN
DeKalb, Ill.

TEXAS TOMBOY
Sirs:
Many thanks for Alice Higgins' fine article on the Fort Sam Houston and San Antonio Charity horse shows and their junior jumper champion Rafael Joseffy (Rafe, the Tomboy Terror of Texas, May 1). But I am left with one question: what does this Texas tomboy look like?
PATRICK McCARTHY
St. Louis

PEANUT-BUTTER GALLERY
Sirs:
Thanks for Coles Phinizy's nice article on Jim Hall and the Chaparral (Racer in a Far-out Country, May 1). Last year it was my privilege to be invited on a boy scout family trip. Our scoutmaster received permission for the troop to visit Jim Hall's plant in Midland, Texas. Never have I seen a group of boys receive a finer welcome.

Jim was there. He and his staff showed the boys everything about the car—except the "peanut butter" in the transmission. They demonstrated quick changes on wheels and disk brakes, explained how a car could be completely serviced in a 28-second pit stop and stressed safe driving and safety features, such as crash helmets and shoulder harnesses. We saw the Chaparral in all stages of construction and dismantling, but somehow that gearbox was always covered up.
RAY CHAPMAN
Lubbock, Texas

Sirs:
Could you please tell me where I can secure one of the Chaparral T shirts mentioned in your article?
DAVID LADENSOHN
San Antonio

•Send requests, along with $1.50 and size (small, medium, large, extra large) to Chaparral Cars, Route 1, Box 62, Midland, Texas.—ED.

SISTERS AND BROTHERS
Sirs:
Psychologist Joyce Brothers may be right about the male baseball fan using the game as a symbolic release from his inability "to prove his masculinity by besting another male in a fencing match or bringing fresh bear meat back to the cave" (PEOPLE, May 1). But she is all wet when she says the women go to a ball game "simply to please the men"—or are my daughter and I, my neighbors and my cleaning lady all freaks?

Perhaps a visit to a ball game might provide her with some much-needed background before she makes her next pronouncement.
NORA W. KORTLUCKE
Richmond Hill, N.Y.

Sirs:
Joyce Brothers is putting you on. Good heavens, does she really know the difference between a third baseman and a catcher, a tight end and a flanker, or a middleweight and a miler—except from the books?

I feel sorry for Joyce, for evidently she has not had the pleasure of spending a day at the ball park with her husband. I only wish my husband and I could go more often.
MARY SPEER
Racine, Wis.

Sirs:
Now how about letting the baseball fan analyze the psychologist? Dr. Brothers is way out in left field on her conclusions about both male and female fans.
MR. AND MRS. JOE GILMORE
Altheimer, Ark.

SIMPLE SOLUTION
Sirs:
Following your recent comments about time-outs for commercials during televised sports events, there are, I think, three legitimate considerations. First, six to eight minutes per hour of commercials is the price the TV fan must pay for his "free" seat. It's a fair price. Secondly, the fact that the structure of some sports, such as football, basketball, hockey and soccer, must be artificially changed to accommodate all this advertising, can be counted at least as an annoyance and at most as a hardship for the paying customer. Finally, the real danger in TV time-outs is that the artificial interruption of the rhythm and tempo of the contest might affect the result. While the chances of this happening in any given game are slim, no sensible TV fan, paying customer, sponsor, promoter, journalist or athlete wants to run even the slightest risk of it.

The answer has been suggested—and tried—before, but it seems worth repeating. TV coverage should begin live, as always. When it is time for a commercial, and play has stopped momentarily, TV should run its commercial. Meanwhile, play should resume at its normal pace, with the telecast going ahead on tape, which will begin running at the conclusion of the commercial. I assume TV would catch up during half times or intermissions.

This procedure would accommodate all interests and leave the TV fan no more than three or four minutes behind the actual event, though he would hardly be aware of it. This would also shorten half times and intermissions slightly (no loss) and give TV experts a moment or two to ponder then-summaries (a decided gain).
ANTHONY L. FLETCHER
Brooklyn

JUDY AND ETHEL
Sirs:
There is little question that Judy Devlin Hashman is the greatest woman badminton player the world has known (Judy Takes a Final Curtain Call, April 24). I do think, however, that some mention should be made of the woman who was next best in the U.S., Ethel Marshall, particularly since, in that same tournament in Flint, Mich. of which Kim Chapin wrote so well, Ethel earned two more national championships—20 years after she had won the national singles for the first time. This brings the total of her U.S. titles to an even dozen.

In Flint, Miss Marshall, 42, a Buffalo stenographer, won a share of both the U.S. senior women's doubles title (with Bea Massman) and the U.S. senior mixed doubles titles (with Bob Traquair).

When Mrs. Hashman first won the national women's championship in 1954, Miss Marshall had already retired from singles play after winning that title seven straight times (1947-53), something no other woman had done until then. Ethel is a lefty and an unorthodox badminton player in other ways, but I don't think any woman can match her record for the long run, or ever will.
R. WILLIAM JOHNSTON
Buffalo

PHOTORAFE JUMPS SEA LORN, HER TEXAS CHAMPION

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)