A roundup of the sports information of the week

September 01, 1968

BASEBALL—An unearned run gave WAKAYAMA, JAPAN a 1-0 win over Richmond in the finals of the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa.

BOATING—MISS EAGLE ELECTRIC, a hydroplane driven by former Air Force Colonel Warner Gardner, scored 1,000 points in three heats to win the President's Cup, on the Potomac River near Washington.

After a previous leader had capsized, TOM ALLEN came on to win the final race and capture his sixth North American Lightning Class championship on Lake Michigan off Chicago.

CHESS—Denmark's Grand Master BENT LARSEN defeated William Martz in the final round of the 12-round Swiss system to win the U.S. Open Chess Championship in Aspen, Colo.

CYCLING—DAVE BRINK, 20, from Berkeley, Calif. pedaled to a 5:10.4 in the 4,000-meter pursuit race to defeat Dave Chouncer and make the U.S. Olympic cycling team. The four-man final was broken down into pairs, and the lone Olympic competitor chosen on the basis of fastest time.

GOLF—BOB MURPHY sank a 12-foot putt on the third hole of the sudden-death playoff against Labron Harris Jr. to win the $100,000 Philadelphia Golf Classic, at Whitemarsh Valley Country Club, Chestnut Hill, Pa.

Kathy Whitworth shot successive 69s for a 138 and successfully defended her Ladies' World Series of Golf title (page 38).

HARNESS RACING—As expected, NEVELE PRIDE, with Stanley Dancer in the sulky, won the $116,190 Hambletonian at Du Quoin, Ill. (page 14). Only the time was disappointing, as the superb trotter took the championship in straight heats—1:59[3/5] and 1:59[2/5].

HORSE RACING—Top weighted at 134 pounds, DR. FAGER ran away from the field, finished 10 lengths in front and set a world's record for the mile in winning the $112,700 Washington Park Handicap in 1:32.2.

MODERN PENTATHLON—A second-place finish in the 4,000-meter cross-country run, the final event in the five-day-long modern pentathlon competition, brought Major JIM MOORE's point total to 9,769.33 and earned him his third national championship. Moore, along with Captain Tom Lough and Jim Kerr, who finished second and third, will represent the U.S. in the modern pentathlon at the Olympic Games.

MOTOR SPORTS—BUCK BAKER, undeterred either by a crash with a spectator's car or the protest of Tiny Lund, who led until he withdrew from the race after receiving a one-lap penalty, won the 200-lap grand touring event at Columbia Speedway, Columbia, Ga.

SHOOTING—In the first three-way shoot-off in the 69-year history of the Grand American Trapshoot Tournament, DENTON CHILDERS shattered 24 of 25 targets to win $4,876. In the regulation round Childers, Bill Hendrickson and Roy Kohl all had perfect scores of 100.

Middleton Tompkins, alter being nine points behind, shot a perfect score at 600 yards and a near-perfect one at 300 yards to win the national, high-powered rifle championship at Camp Perry, Ohio.

SOCCER—NASL: WASHINGTON took over first place in the Eastern Conference's Atlantic Division by defeating Boston and tying second-place ATLANTA (1-0-1) as well as third place NEW YORK (0-1-1). BALTIMORE (1-1-0) was in fourth place, while Boston (0-2-1) was securely mired in last place. CLEVELAND (2-0-0) continued to lead the Lakes Division as runner-up CHICAGO (1-0-0) lost ground. TORONTO (0-1-0) held third and DETROIT (0-1-0) was last. The Gulf Division of the Western Conference remained unchanged: KANSAS CITY (0-2-0) was first, ST. LOUIS (0-0-1) second, HOUSTON (0-0-1) third and DALLAS (0-1-1) fourth. In the Pacific Division of the Western Conference, OAKLAND (3-0-0), still moving, climbed into first place, four points ahead of SAN DIEGO (1-0-0), as LOS ANGELES (1-1-0) took over third. VANCOUVER (0-1-0) dropped to fourth, as the standings in the division changed completely.

TENNIS—ARTHUR ASHE defeated unseeded Bob Lutz, who had gained the final with upset victories over Cliff Richey, Bob Hewitt and Clark Graebner, to win the U.S. Men's Singles Championship in Chestnut Hill, Mass. (page 44). Lutz held the advantage after three sets (4-6, 6-3, 8-10), but Ashe came back to take the last two, 6-0, 6-4, and become the first Negro to win the men's title.

TRACK & FIELD—Australian RON CLARKE broke his own world record (8:19.8) for the two-mile, running that distance in 8:19.6 at White City Stadium. London, England. At the same meet, a British women's relay team—MAUREEN TRANTER, DELLA JAMES, JANET SIMPSON and VALERIE PEAT—set a new world's record for the 800-meter relay with a time of 1:33.8.

The U.S. women's team as selected at the Olympic trials at Walnut, Calif.: 100 meters—WYOMIA TYUS, MARGARET BAILES, BARBARA FERRELL; 200 meters—MARGARET BAILES, WYOMIA TYUS, BARBARA FERRELL; 400 meters—JARVIS SCOTT, LOIS DRINKWATER, ESTHER STROY; 800 meters—MADELINE MANNING. DORIS BROWN, JARVIS SCOTT: 80-meter hurdles—MAMIE RALLINS, PAT VAN WOLVELEARE; long jump—MARTHA WATSON, WILLYE WHITE; high jump—SHARON CALLAHAN, ELEANOR MONTGOMERY, ESTELLE BASKERVILLE; shotput—MAREN SEIDLER; discus—OLGA CONNOLLY; javelin—BARBARA FRIEDRICH.

MILEPOSTS—NAMED: MONTE IRVIN, former New York Giant outfielder and wheelhorse (a league-leading 121 RBIs) of the Giants' unforgettable 1951 pennant-winning team, as special assistant to Baseball Commissioner William D. Eckert. Irvin's appointment may be the beginning of the long-awaited black breakthrough into the executive branch of baseball.

SIGNED: The American Football League's leading touchdown receiver, ART POWELL, 31, by the Minnesota Vikings. Powell, who began his pro career with the Philadelphia Eagles, returns to the National Football League after eight years with the New York Jets, the Oakland Raiders and the Buffalo Bills.

DIED: HEINIE GROH, 78, the originator of the bottle bat and for 16 years one of baseballs finest infielders, in Cincinnati. Groh broke into the major leagues with John McGraw and the New York Giants in 1912, played on Giant pennant winners in 1912 and 1913 and was then traded to Cincinnati. He returned to the Giants in 1922 and was the hero of the World Series that year, batting .474 as the Giants crushed the Yankees, whose star, Babe Ruth, hit only .118. He retired in 1927.

DIED: EARL SANDE, 69, outstanding jockey, one of the brightest figures of the golden age of sports—the 1920s—and a member of Thoroughbred racing's Hall of Fame, in Jacksonville, Ore. An irascible man, Sande was a superb competitor. Weight problems forced him to retire in 1928, but two years later he returned to racing, won the Kentucky Derby for the third time and guided Gallant Fox to the Triple Crown. He retired again in 1932 and became a trainer but had only indifferent success. In 1953 at the age of 55, he came back once more, rode in 10 races (he won one) and then left the track for good.

DIED: ALBERT (DOLLY) STARK, 70, a National League umpire for 12 years, who was renowned for his hustle and dramatic gestures, in New York.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)