FAVORITES FOR MEDALS IN MEXICO

September 29, 1968

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NINETEEN PHOTOS TWENTY THREE ILLUSTRATIONS

EVENT

FAVORITE

SECOND

THIRD

ANALYSIS

TRACK & FIELD
100 METERS

GREENE, U.S.A.

HINES, U.S.A.

MILLER, Jamaica

Greene and Hines should be 1, 2— or 2,1— in 100 and Mel Pender could make it a sweep, but Russia's Sapeya and the veteran medalists, Figuerola (Cuba) and Jerome (Canada), are all dangerous. Smith and Carlos dominate the 200; Fray (Jamaica), Questad (U.S.A.) and Roberts (Trinidad) are a step or two behind. Barring a foul-up in the passing zones, U.S. has a sure win in the relay.

200 METERS

SMITH, U.S.A.

CARLOS, U.S.A.

BAMBUCK, France

400-METER RELAY

U.S.A.

EAST GERMANY

FRANCE

400 METERS

EVANS, U.S.A.

JAMES, U.S.A.

FREEMAN, U.S.A.

The only runners who appear capable of beating the three Americans in the 400 are other Americans not in the race. Most certain gold medal in Olympics is U.S. in 1,600 relay. The 800, on the other hand, is wide open, with potential winners from four continents (Bell and Farrell of the U.S.; Kiprugut; Adams, Kemper, Matuschew-ski and Fromm of the two Germanies; Doubell of Australia). In the 1,500 Wadoux of France, Garderud of Sweden and De Hertoghe of Belgium are among the medal possibilities.

1,600-METER RELAY

U.S.A.

POLAND

WEST GERMANY

800 METERS

BELL, U.S.A.

KIPRUGUT, Kenya

ADAMS, West Germany

1,500 METERS

RYUN, U.S.A.

KEINO, Kenya

TUMMLER, West Germany

5,000 METERS

KEINO, Kenya

GAMMOUDI, Tunisia

CLARKE, Australia

The 10,000 is run first, and altitude may upset plans for doubling up. If Keino and Gammoudi go in the 10, either could win, but if they do go in the 10, they may not be strong in the five. Watch the Russians and Colombia's Mejia in the 10 and Norpoth (West Germany), Mecser (Hungary), Zammel (Tunisia), Sawaki (Japan) in the five. Ethiopia's Bikila, recovering from a knee ailment, might upset Clayton. Young's strength at altitude makes him the steeplechase favorite.

10,000 METERS

TEMU, Kenya

CLARKE, Australia

HAASE, East Germany

MARATHON

CLAYTON, Australia

BIKILA, Ethiopia

JOHNSTON, Great Britain

STEEPLECHASE

YOUNG, U.S.A.

KUDINSKY, U.S.S.R.

KUHA, Finland

110-METER HURDLES

DAVENPORT, U.S.A.

COLEMAN, U.S.A.

OTTOZ, Italy

The U.S. may sweep both hurdle events, with Hall edging Ottoz in the 110 and Gittins beating Hemery in the 400. Frinolli of Italy. Singer of East Germany and Knoke of Australia are also strong in the longer event.

400-METER HURDLES

WHITNEY, U.S.A.

VANDERSTOCK, U.S.A.

HEMERY, Great Britain

HIGH JUMP

CARUTHERS, U.S.A.

GAVRILOV, U.S.S.R.

SKVORTSOV, U.S.S.R.

Caruthers superb performance in the trials established him as the favorite in the high jump. Beamon appears supreme in long jump and old Ralph Boston could earn his third Olympic medal. Finland's Pousi has best triple jump in world this year and may be medalist. So might two-time winner Schmidt of Poland. Other vaulters to watch include Pennel of U.S., Alarotu and Mustakari of Finland, Papanicolaou of Greece, Bliznetsov of Russia and Dionisi of Italy.

LONG JUMP

BEAMON, U.S.A.

TER-OVANESYAN, U.S.S.R.

DAVIES, Great Britain

TRIPLE JUMP

SANEYEV, U.S.S.R.

NEUMANN, East Germany

WALKER, U.S.A.

POLE VAULT

SEAGREN, U.S.A.

NORDWIG, East Germany

D'ENCAUSSE, France

SHOTPUT

MATSON, U.S.A.

WOODS, U.S.A.

MAGGARD, U.S.A.

West Germany's Birlenbach and East Germany's Hoffmann are threats in the shot. The U.S. could go 1, 2, 3, in discus with Carlsen, but Danek of Czechoslovakia is at his best in October. In the hammer Theimer of East Germany and Bondarchuk or Kondrashov of Russia have the best chance to keep the 1, 2, 3 finishers at Tokyo from repeating, and Burke of the U.S. cannot be counted out. U.S. has only a slim chance of interrupting the European monopoly in the javelin.

DISCUS

SILVESTER, U.S.A.

OERTER, U.S.A.

MILDE, East Germany

HAMMER

KLIM, U.S.S.R.

ZSIVOTZKY, Hungary

BEYER, West Germany

JAVELIN

LUSIS, U.S.S.R.

KINNUNEN, Finland

KULCSAR, Hungary

DECATHLON

BENDLIN, West Germany

TOOMEY, U.S.A.

AUN, U.S.S.R.

Toomey, who has stamina to win, claims Bendlin will take gold or drop out with an injury.

20-KM. WALK

AGAPOV, U.S.S.R.

REIMANN, East Germany

PEDRAZA, Mexico

Agapov broke the world record in the 20-km. walk this year but altitude may be a factor in Pedraza's favor. East Germans, led by Höhne, will be hard to beat in the 50-km. Larry Young of the U.S. is surprisingly good.

50-KM. WALK

HOHNE, East Germany

NERMERICH, West Germany

NIHILL, Great Britain

WOMEN
100 METERS

TYUS, U.S.A.

BAILES, U.S.A.

SZEWINSKA, Poland

Tyus, the defender in the 100 meters, is back to her 1964 form but Bailes might beat her. Either Burge of Australia or Ferrell of the U.S.A. are likely to challenge for third. In the 200 world record holder Szewinska (formerly Kirszenstein) should win by a couple of yards. Cuba's Cobian is a medal threat. The U.S. should win the relay. Cuba and Britain are medal possibilities.

200 METERS

SZEWINSKA, Poland

BURGE, Australia

BAILES, U.S.A.

400-METER RELAY

U.S.A.

U.S.S.R.

AUSTRALIA

400 METERS

BOARD, Great Britain

SCOTT, U.S.A.

BURDA, U.S.S.R.

Sweden's Wallgren is a possibility in the 400 meters. So are Keizer of The Netherlands and Silai of Rumania in the 800, especially since Manning seems troubled by altitude.

800 METERS

NIKOLIC, Yugoslavia

BROWN, U.S.A.

MANNING, U.S.A.

80-METER HURDLES

KILBORN, Australia

BALZER, East Germany

KORSAKOVA, U.S.S.R.

Balzer upset Kilborn in Tokyo but won't this time. Watch Russia's Ivleva and China's Cheng.

HIGH JUMP

SCHMIDT, East Germany

OKOROKOVA, U.S.S.R.

GUSENBAUER, Austria

Schmidt is nearly two inches better than her competition and hard to pick against. Becker was the world's best long jumper last year. Sherwood of Britain, Rosendahl of West Germany, Wieczorek of East Germany or Viscopoleanu of Rumania could win medals. Shotput favorite Chizhova is consistent. In the discus Westermann has reclaimed her world record but her bad habit of losing to East Germans makes Illgen the choice. The javelin will be close. Penes of Rumania, Koloska of West Germany, Janko of Austria and Fuchs of East Germany are all strong.

LONG JUMP

SZEWINSKA, Poland

BECKER, West Germany

BERTHELSEN, Norway

SHOTPUT

CHIZHOVA, U.S.S.R.

GUMMEL, East Germany

BOGNAR, Hungary

DISCUS

ILLGEN, East Germany

WESTERMANN, West Germany

SPIELBERG, East Germany

JAVELIN

JAWORSKA, Poland

NEMETH, Hungary

FRIEDRICH, U.S.A.

PENTATHLON

ROSENDAHL, West Germany

BECKER, West Germany

TIKHOMIROVA, U.S.S.R.

With Britain's Mary Rand retired, Rosendahl should win, possibly with a new world record.

SWIMMING
100-METER FREESTYLE

ZORN, U.S.A.

WALSH, U.S.A.

SPITZ, U.S.A.

Schollander, four-time gold medalist at Tokyo, is in a class by himself in the 200, but watch Nelson (U.S.), Zorn'scompetition will betougherin the 100, but this 6'4" Californian seldom loses. Spitz seems certain to finish at least third in the 100, but Russia's Ilyichev and France's Rousseu are both good. Burton and Echeverría will wage classic duels, though pressed by Hutton in the 400. Burton's times are better, but Echeverría is more in tune with the altitude.

200-METER FREESTYLE

SCHOLLANDER, U.S.A.

WENDEN, Australia

ILYICHEV, U.S.S.R.

400-METER FREESTYLE

BURTON, U.S.A.

ECHEVERRIA, Mexico

HUTTON, Canada

1,500-METER FREESTYLE

BURTON, U.S.A.

ECHEVERRIA, Mexico

KINSELLA, U.S.A.

100-METER BREASTSTROKE

FIOLO, Brazil

PANKIN, U.S.S.R.

HENNINGER, East Germany

Otherwise dominant Americans may not even win a medal, unless Merten or Job surprise. Australia's O'Brien, gold medal winner in '64, will have trouble repeating.

200-METER BREASTSTROKE

KOSINSKY, U.S.S.R.

PANKIN, U.S.S.R.

FIOLO, Brazil

100-METER BUTTERFLY

SPITZ, U.S.A.

RUSSELL, U.S.A.

WALES, U.S.A.

Precocious Spitz, armed with both world records, should take gold medals in his specialities. Great Britain's Woodroffe will challenge the U.S. powerhouse in both events.

200-METER BUTTERFLY

SPITZ, U.S.A.

FERRIS, U.S.A.

ROBIE, U.S.A.

100-METER BACKSTROKE

MATHES, East Germany

HICKCOX, U.S.A.

MILLS, U.S.A.

America's Hickcox is spoiling for a shot at East Germany's Mathes in the 100, but Mathes, world record holder in both events, will be better rested and should prevail.

200-METER BACKSTROKE

MATHES, East Germany

HORSLEY, U.S.A.

IVEY, U.S.A.

200-METER INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

HICKCOX, U.S.A.

FERRIS, U.S.A.

BUCKINGHAM, U.S.A.

Hickcox smashed world records in U.S. trials. Holthaus may be troubled by altitude, and Russia's Dunayev, former world record-holder in 400, or Hall of U.S. may beat him.

400-METER INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

HICKCOX, U.S.A.

HOLTHAUS, West Germany

BUCKINGHAM, U.S.A.

400-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

U.S.A.

RUSSIA

AUSTRALIA

U.S.A., U.S.A., U.S.A. and it shouldn't be close, even at altitude. In U.S. trials, a 400-meter freestyle team-Zorn, Rerych, Walsh, Schollander swam as a unit for first time and set a world record, just for kicks. Best of the rest may be East Germany in 400 medley.

800-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

U.S.A.

RUSSIA

AUSTRALIA

400-METER MEDLEY RELAY

U.S.A.

EAST GERMANY

RUSSIA

SPRINGBOARD DIVE

RUSSELL, U.S.A.

HENRY, U.S.A.

CAGNOTTO, Italy

U.S. and Italy dominate but Mexico, East Germany, Russia, Poland and Japan all have divers who could upset. Wrightson of the U.S. and Dibiasi may surprise in springboard.

PLATFORM DIVE

DIBIASI, Italy

RUSSELL, U.S.A.

YOUNG, U.S.A.

WOMEN
100-METER FREESTYLE

PEDERSEN, U.S.A.

HENNE, U.S.A.

GUSTAVSON, U.S.A.

The U.S. may not only win all four freestyle golds, it may well sweep all 12 medals. Meyer is the world's premier female swimmer at the age of 16. She set world records in three events—200, 400, 800—during U.S. trials. Meyer did not qualify in 100, where Pedersen is closing in on Dawn Fraser's world mark. Hungary's Turoczy is a threat in 100 and Australia's Moras has chance in 400.

200-METER FREESTYLE

MEYER, U.S.A.

HENNE, U.S.A.

BARKMAN, U.S.A.

400-METER FREESTYLE

MEYER, U.S.A.

GUSTAVSON, U.S.A.

KRUSE, U.S.A.

800-METER FREESTYLE

MEYER, U.S.A.

CARETTO, U.S.A.

KRUSE, U.S.A.

100-METER BREASTSTROKE

BALL, U.S.A.

PROZUMENSHCHIKOVA, U.S.S.R.

WICHMAN, U.S.A.

Russia's '64 gold medalist, Prozumenshchikova, is back, but Ball set world records during U.S. trials. Wittke of East Germany, Uruguay's Norbis or Australia's Playfair may surprise.

200-METER BREASTSTROKE

BALL, U.S.A.

PROZUMENSHCHIKOVA, U.S.S.R.

JAMISON, U.S.A.

100-METER BUTTERFLY

KOK, The Netherlands

DANIEL, U.S.A.

SHIELDS, U.S.A.

Holland's Kok, silver medalist in '64, should win her specialty, the 100, but must be wary of Daniel's fast pace and Hewitt's come-from-behind style in 200. Shields is a dark horse.

200-METER BUTTERFLY

HEWITT, U.S.A.

KOK, The Netherlands

DANIEL, U.S.A.

100-METER BACKSTROKE

TANNER, Canada

HALL, U.S.A.

CARON, France

Ouster of South Africa knocked world record-holder Muir out of Olympics. Hall could press for gold medal in 100. Possible upsetters include Swagerty, U.S., and Duprez, France, in 100; and Atwood, U.S., in 200.

200-METER BACKSTROKE

WATSON, U.S.A.

TANNER, Canada

WATSON, Australia

200-METER INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

KOLB, U.S.A.

PEDERSEN, U.S.A.

HENNE, U.S.A.

Kolb, who set two world records in U.S. trials, expects to be almost six seconds slower at Mexico City's altitude. East Germany's Steinbach may break up U.S. sweeps.

400-METER INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

KOLB, U.S.A.

PEDERSEN, U.S.A.

VIDALI, U.S.A.

400-METER FREESTYLE RELAY

U.S.A.

CANADA

AUSTRALIA

Whoever swims on its relay teams, the U.S. is so deep and talented that it is odds-on to capture two golds. East Germany may force its way into medal bracket in both events.

400-METER MEDLEY RELAY

U.S.A.

CANADA

GREAT BRITAIN

SPRINGBOARD DIVE

O'SULLIVAN, U.S.A.

KING, U.S.A.

POGOZHEVA, U.S.S.R.

Diving is so wide-open that U.S. has six possible gold medalists and Russia three. East Germany's veteran Kra'mer-Gulbin and Duchkova of Czech oslovakia also are strong.

PLATFORM DIVE

PETERSON, U.S.A.

ALEKSEYEVA, U.S.S.R.

BUSH, U.S.A.

BASKETBALL

U.S.S.R.

U.S.A.

YUGOSLAVIA

For the first time ever the U.S. is not favored to win the gold—and may have trouble taking the silver. Russia is big and a lot more knowledgeable than in 1964. Yugoslavia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Brazil also have best-ever teams.

BOXING
(11 events)

U.S.S.R.
2 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze

POLAND
2 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

ITALY
2 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

Russian boxers do not turn professional. With their veterans, their aggressive style and their large number of southpaws, they should dominate again. Four Americans, led by Heavyweight Foreman, have outside chance for medals as do Africans and Latin Americans.

CANOEING
(7 events)

U.S.S.R.
4 gold, 2 silver

WEST GERMANY
1 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

RUMANIA
1 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

Michigan's Marcia Smoke may pick up medals in both the women's kayak singles and pairs but U.S. chances elsewhere are slim. Russia is a threat in almost every competition.

CYCLING
(7 events)

ITALY
3 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

U.S.S.R.
1 gold, 2 silver

WEST GERMANY
1 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

The U.S. has not won a cycling event since 1896 but speedster Jack Simes of Closter, N.J. has an outside chance in 1,000-m. time trial. Europeans will dominate, as always, but Colombia's Cochise and Trinidad's Gibbon, the sprint cycling king of the Western Hemisphere, could surprise.

EQUESTRIAN
(6 events)

GREAT BRITAIN
1 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

WEST GERMANY
2 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

U.S.A.
1 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

U.S. team is tops in jumping, woefully weak in dressage. Russia or Italy could break into top triumvirate, and Australia, France and Brazil also have good chances for medals.

FENCING
(8 events)

U.S.S.R.
6 gold, 2 silver

HUNGARY
1 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

POLAND
1 silver, 1 bronze

For the first time in history one country—Russia—could win all the gold. The Russians won six of eight events at the world championships last year and they are even stronger now. As for the U.S., even a bronze medal in any event would be the next thing to a miracle.

FIELD HOCKEY

INDIA

PAKISTAN

AUSTRALIA

Since 1928 India has only lost once—in 1960 to Pakistan—and the team is confident it can win again. One upset possibility: Kenya, which may profit from the Nairobi-like altitude.

GYMNASTICS
(14 events)

U.S.S.R.
5 gold, 5 silver, 3 bronze

JAPAN
4 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze

CZECHOSLOVAKIA
2 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze

U.S. progress has been steady, but too slow, so it is likely to be the same old story: Russia, Japan and Czechoslovakia carrying off the medals, and not necessarily in that order. East German men and women also will challenge.

MODERN PENTATHLON

Team: HUNGARY
Individual: Balczo (Hungary)

U.S.S.R.
Shaparnis (U.S.S.R.)

EAST GERMANY
Török (Hungary)

World champion Balczo should win the gold, but Major Jim Moore of Erie, Pa. could be a dark-horse medalist. In the team event U.S. or Swedish riders have a chance to slip by East Germany.

ROWING
(7 events)

EAST GERMANY
2 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

U.S.A.
1 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

U.S.S.R.
1 gold. 2 silver, 1 bronze

The U.S. has the potential to win five medals, but so do East Germany, Russia, The Netherlands and West Germany. The U.S. pairs of Hough and Johnson have best chance for gold medal, followed by the coxed fours and eights.

SHOOTING
(7 events)

U.S.A.
3 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze

U.S.S.R.
1 gold, 2 silver, 3 bronze

WEST GERMANY
1 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

With any kind of luck, American sharpshooters, led by Anderson in free rifle and McMillan in rapid-fire pistol, will be medalists in all events. Russian marksmen could be, too.

SOCCER

MEXICO

HUNGARY

CZECHOSLOVAKIA

Since the host country always enjoys a considerable advantage, Mexico should upset defending Olympic champion Hungary and win its first soccer medal of any color in history.

VOLLEYBALL

Men: U.S.S.R.
Women: JAPAN

CZECHOSLOVAKIA
U.S.S.R.

JAPAN
U.S.A.

Spirited competition among Russia, Czechoslovakia and Japan seems certain to feature men's competition, but once-weak U.S. women may challenge Russia and Japan, thanks to Coach Cohen's Spartan and productive training.

WATER POLO

U.S.S.R.

YUGOSLAVIA

HUNGARY

Starry-eyed U.S. is dreaming of gold, but actually has only an outside chance against muscular teams of Russia, Yugoslavia and Hungary.

WEIGHT LIFTING
(7 events)

U.S.S.R.
3 gold, 4 silver

POLAND
2 gold, 2 bronze

JAPAN
1 gold, 2 bronze

Once again all of Russia's lifters should be medalists, but U.S. Coach Terpak has hopes for his team, especially Heavyweights Dube and Pickett. They will have Russia's Zhabotinsky to beat, but Zhabo supposedly gets dizzy at altitude.

WRESTLING
(16 events)

U.S.S.R.
7 gold, 2 silver, 3 bronze

IRAN
2 gold, 3 silver, 3 bronze

JAPAN
2 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze

Boycott by veteran wrestlers, whose demands for "compensation" were denied, leaves usually strong Turkey weak and inexperienced, enhancing Russia's hopes for gold. U.S. shooting for fourth, behind Iran and Japan.

YACHTING
(5 events)

U.S.A.
2 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze

DENMARK
2 gold

GREAT BRITAIN
1 gold, 1 silver

The U.S. team looks best over-all, and should take the gold in 5.5 and Dragon competition. Denmark will be favored in Finn and Star, and England in the Flying Dutchman.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)