19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

May 18, 1969

AND STILL CHAMPION
Sirs:
Congratulations on your fine article, The Art of Ali (May 5), which shows the real art of boxing. The great photographs by Phillip Leonian catch the one and only Cassius Clay in what he does the best.

Muhammad Ali-Cassius Clay, or whatever you want to call him, is still the world champion. And until somebody beats him in the ring, no one can take away his crown.
MICHAEL CARRETTI
Brooklyn

Sirs:
The article on Muhammad Ali-Cassius Clay was most interesting to me as a former boxing instructor (for more than 20 years), and I readily agree that no prizefighter ever fought entirely by the book. Yes—Gene Tunney came close to doing so, as did the great James Corbett. It is also my opinion that Clay surpasses any man at present in the heavyweight division as a scientific boxer and packs a punch that is superior to Corbett's.

In the years when I had boxing gyms in Cincinnati and Columbus, Ohio, and two in San Bernardino, Calif., I saw many top fighters work out. I recall in my Columbus days all the Zivic boys, Jack, Fritz and Pete, the wonderful Harry Greb, Carl Tremaine, Jock Malone, Frankie Callahan, Bryan, Anthony and Joe Downey, Harry Forbes and many others. Your article was excellent and, along with the photos, I have to tell you that I truly enjoyed it.
STAN NEWLIN
Monterey, Calif.

Sirs:
There is one thing missing in your cover picture of Mr. Clay. He should be looking through bars.
ROBERT OWENS
Onalaska, Wis.

BLISS IN BEANTOWN
Sirs:
Thank you for your article, Boston Roars Back (April 28). No city in the country has experienced such excitement sportswise as has Boston this year. This town is engulfed in an epidemic of sports fever. It has affected everyone, young and old alike. With the Celtics, Bruins and Sox, there hasn't been one dull moment in the past few months. We may not win everything, but no matter what happens, it's been a wonderful year.

Happiness is being a sports fan and living in Boston.
CHRISTINE O'HEARN
Malden, Mass.

RECALL
Sirs:
So Avery Brundage has recalled all Alpine Olympic medals because of professionalism (SCORECARD, May 5). What does Mr. Brundage propose to do about the summer Olympic track shoe "scandal"? Recall the Mexico Olympics?

Perhaps Mr. Brundage himself should be recalled and replaced by someone with a more realistic and honest attitude.
LINDA DARNTON
Glen Wild, N.Y.

TABLE TALK
Sirs:
It certainly was a pleasure to read about so many table tennis stars in one issue of SI (May 5). Most, of course, were mentioned by Dick Miles in his article, No Defense Against Murder, but Charles Goren kept the ball bouncing with his article about North American bridge team member Eddie Kantar (Two Lame Ducks in the Bowl). Did you know that Eddie was the Minnesota state champion and was ranked in the top 20 in the nation by the U.S. Table Tennis Association? Reading further, I came across the name of Sportscaster Buddy Blattner (The Top Three by a Long Shot). Buddy, of course, was the world doubles champion in the '30s.

For the record, many other American athletes have gone to or from table tennis: Stuffy Singer, 1968 U.S. handball champion, was ranked in the top 20; Olympians Bill Sharpe (triple jump) and Sperry Rademaker (women's kayaks) are currently ranked in the top five in Pennsylvania and Florida, respectively.
STEVE ISAACSON
Former Selection Chairman, USTTA
Chicago

COMMAND PERFORMANCE
Sirs:
Jeannette Bruce's Slave to a Shah (May 5) was a delightful article. I recognized many of her characters after going through eight weeks of the strange ritual of taking my dog to obedience school. Reading this article brought to mind a particularly embarrassing experience engineered by my 2-year-old dachshund, Lee, during one session. Lee was commanded to sit and stay at one end of the room. When commanded to "Come!" Lee got up, looked around and then strolled into the ladies' room. Most of the other trainers thought this very humorous; I thought it very embarrassing and the impeccably mannered poodles seemed to be smirking.
WILLIAM W. KENYON
Warwick, R.I.

DOWN AT THE HEEL
Sirs:
I feel like the world expert concerning jogger's heel (SCORECARD, May 5). I know the cure; I hope my suffering can spare others the misery I endured.

My jogging began in April 1968. Within several weeks my ankles and heels were actually black and blue. This was from nothing more strenuous than a one-or two-mile jog each day. This state of affairs lasted for months. I was too stubborn to quit, although I limped a good deal of the time.

The answer turned out to be plastic heel cups, which I saw advertised in Track & Field News and tried out of desperation. Since I have used these heel cups, all problems with my feet have vanished. They apparently spread out the shock of the heel hitting the ground so it is not bothersome. Friends have confirmed my experience, so it is not unique. I hope this solution can become widely known.
DONN B. KIRK
Los Altos, Calif.

CON GAME
Sirs:
After reading Joe McGinniss' article, Conning the Con Men of Kentucky (May 5), I wondered if he saw the Derby. There is no daily double at Churchill Downs on Derby Day, but somehow he "played a double." Apparently Mr. McGinniss attempted to con the readers of SI.
KEITH GEORGE
Louisville

JEAN-FRAUD
Sirs:
Sure it's illegal—yet I can't help but admire the imagination of Bernard Dubrulle in his let's-pretend life as Jean-Claude Killy (Living the Life of Killy, April 28). Adding to his disguise (as shown in your photo) was his choice of a lapel pin to wear—ours!

Under any alias, Dubrulle-Killy is not a member. I sorta wish he was—he's got Gallic flair, for sure.
WILLIAM H. OTTLEY
Executive Director
National Pilots Association
Washington

NET GAINS
Sirs:
The Right Way to Begin (April 28) by Welby Van Horn with Frank Deford was excellent.

Our hat goes off to Van Horn and the other tennis pros across the country who are working with youngsters. Tennis is definitely on the upswing, as evidenced by the responses we are getting in organizing our national Youth Tennis League for boys and girls under 15.
JACK MARKS
President
Youth Tennis League, Inc.
Satellite Beach, Fla.

SOCCER HAPPENINGS
Sirs:
As a visiting Englishman, I was interested to read your article on soccer violence in England (This Riotous Isle, April 21). Wilfred Sheed has some reasonable comments to make concerning violence, but he seems to have gotten the wrong impression of the actual game of soccer. Soccer is loved mainly for its uninterruptedness. Most good goals result from direct play. Goals are hardly ever accidental. They are the product of a good attacking team or a blunder by the defense. Offsides, too, are comparatively rare when compared to goals. I suggest that Sheed cannot have seen many games when he talks of "80 minutes of nothing happening." Soccer retains its large following throughout the world precisely because something is always happening.
D. ANTHONY HEALEY
Burlington, Vt.

Sirs:
Immensely enjoyed your article depicting the violence associated with soccer in England today.

Soccer is a great sport and I was saddened to see its virtual collapse in this country without a fair trial. Who knows? Had it been given the chance, we might have seen the same type of shenanigans among soccer fans in America some day. In the meantime, I'll try to cheer the Merseyside Continentals of the Washington, D.C. National Soccer League on to victory each week.
DALE WAINWRIGHT
Arlington, Va.

COASTAL DEFENSE
Sirs:
In my opinion, your article on Salishan (The Resort That Helps Preserve a Wild Seashore, April 28) was a gross insult to the Oregon coast. It was stated that "after miles of beer joints and tourist cabins, there—suddenly—is something worthy of its [Oregon's] landscape." This makes it sound like the Oregon coast is just one big tourist trap, which most certainly it is not! Salishan is a very nice place and I am not trying to take anything away from it, but your article—sheesh!
DAVID DOERR
Lincoln City, Ore.

Sirs:
Thank you for publishing the pictures of Salishan. As an Oregonian, I have visited the area many times but have never seen anything except the motor inn and a piece of the golf course. You see, one picture was left out, the one showing the guard and gate.
RAYMOND M. HARE
Portland, Ore.

WRAP-UP
Sirs:
Anent your SCORECARD piece of April 28 titled "Words Make Me Cross," let me share one that happened in all innocence to a lovely gal performer I know. Carol Laird emceed a show for the marines at Camp Pendleton a couple of months ago. A few days later I asked her how it went. "Fine," she said, "and everyone seemed to like me except one girl. The contortionist."

I asked why the girl had not liked her, and Carol answered, "Oh, I don't know. That contortionist was all wrapped up in herself."
JACK DENTON
Hollywood

MIDWEST VERSION
Sirs:
In reference to your article a few weeks ago on the Mount Washington Lacrosse Club (The Old Boys Are Still Best, March 31), the Mounties may be one of the best club teams around, but there is no doubt that the most dedicated group of individuals are those who play for the Chicago Lacrosse Club. This team is composed of 20 people who have played lacrosse in the East during college and who now live in the Chicago area. The club has won its first two games, and it has high hopes for an undefeated season. It is quite a sight to see 20 people running around near Lake Michigan practicing in the middle of February in five-or 10-degree temperatures. You can just hear each one of them asking himself why he is paying a $20 membership fee for this pleasure.
FREDRIC B. WEINSTEIN
Chicago

Sirs:
Just a congratulatory note on your fine article dealing with the Mount Washington Lacrosse Club. Mount Washington does epitomize the best in the realm of sportsmanship and amateur sports.

I work with the University of Michigan lacrosse team. Interest in the sport is growing in the Midwest. More and more people are learning about it every day, and I sincerely feel that once a person has seen the game he will become a fan of it.
HENRY E. FLANAGAN JR.
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Address editorial mail to TIME & LIFE Bldg., Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)