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Contents

Oct. 06, 1969
Oct. 06, 1969

Table of Contents
Oct. 6, 1969

Playoffs
Bowl Of Their Dreams
Man Believed Sane
College Football
People
Flying
Design For Sport
Horse Racing
Golf
Hunting
Miss America
Baseball's Week
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Departments

Contents

18 62-0
Starting its quest for a second straight national title, Ohio State crushed TCU to prove it is ready and mean

This is an article from the Oct. 6, 1969 issue Original Layout

20 The Playoffs: the Ideal and the Omen
The Orioles have everything except Harmon Killebrew, who could spark an upset. The Mets have an augury

26 Pro Basketball's Coming-Out Party
It celebrated the debuts of Lew Alcindor and Connie Hawkins, playing against each other

28 To the Bowl of Their Dreams
The trail back to the Super Bowl is long, long and winding, but Green Bay is once again on the right path

36 Man Believed Sane Runs 105,000 Miles
Bill Emmerton is a long-distance runner but he isn't lonely; his wife drives behind, telling him to step it up

60 A Hobby to Drive You Crazy
Sporting stamps are being issued by every nation, and even avid collectors can never hope for a complete set

70 "There She Is..."
The Miss America Pageant, Atlantic City's competitive classic, deserves—and gets—a sporting look

The departments

13 Scorecard
42 College Football
52 People
56 Flying
58 Bridge
60 Design for Sport
63 Horse Racing
64 Golf
66 Hunting
85 For the Record
86 Baseball's Week
88 19th Hole

Credits on page 85

Cover photograph by Walter Iooss Jr.

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Next week

The south has risen on the college football front, with teams such as Tennessee, LSU, Georgia, Alabama and Florida undefeated so far. Pat Putnam inspects the conference powers.

Bare-Knuckle hockey is in prospect as the NHL season opens. Gary Ronberg scouts all of the teams, and Boston's Phil Esposito reviews his run at the scoring title.

Pro Football did not always reckon its rewards in millions. Myron Cope talks to the pros of decades ago, men whose recollections evoke a sport—and a time—long gone.