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Q&A Katie Hnida

Dec. 25, 2006
Dec. 25, 2006

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Dec. 25, 2006

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Q&A Katie Hnida

The 25-year-old is the author of Still Kicking: My Journey As the First Woman to Play Division I College Football

SI: Three years ago you told SI's Rick Reilly that in the summer of 1999, after your freshman year at Colorado, you were raped by a teammate (SI, Feb. 23, 2004). How was it to write about that?

This is an article from the Dec. 25, 2006 issue Original Layout

Hnida: Part of the writing was therapeutic, but a better way to describe [reliving] things like the rape and the harassment at CU is surgery. It was something that was incredibly painful but in the end was healing and put me in a more healthy place.

SI: After you went public, then Colorado coach Gary Barnett said you were an "awful" player. You haven't spoken with him since 2000. If he wanted to apologize, would you hear him out?

Hnida: I would absolutely be open to listening to what he had to say. But it's not something I necessarily need. I've made peace with Coach Barnett and his role in my life.

SI: In 2003 you kicked two extra points for New Mexico in a 72--8 win over Texas State--San Marcos, making you the first woman to score in a Division I game. How often do you think about that game?

Hnida: Not as often as you'd think. I think back on the environment and camaraderie we had at New Mexico.

SI: Think we'll ever see a female starting kicker at a Division I school?

Hnida:I definitely think it's possible. I thought it was possible for me, but I had a turn of events.

SI: You're now living in New York City. Is it hard to find places to kick?

Hnida: There are not a lot of goal posts. But I do keep a kicking net at my gym. And my cleats travel with me no matter where I go.

For more from Katie Hnida, go to SI.com/scorecard.

PHOTODAVID YELLEN/PEOPLE (HNIDA)PHOTOGREG SORBER ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL/AP (HNIDA KICKING)