19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

January 26, 1970

PARADISIACAL REVELATIONS
Sirs:
Your Jan. 12 article on Hawaii (Go Back to a New Grass Shack) warms me and at the same time stirs deep resentment. You put down the ravening tourist crowd, you scorn the oft-trod paths of the islands, then proceed to expose the existence of Hana Ranch and Kona Village.

It took me hours of research to discover and thousands of dollars to get to these two "hideaways" in recent years. Like Author Michener, who announced to the world the perfections of Hamoa Beach, you should have your typewriter taken away for this one. The swimwear revelations almost, but not quite, make up for your paradisiacal revelations.
RICHARD J. PATTON
Olympia Fields, Ill.

Sirs:
Nothing like adding a little spice to the old magazine! I didn't read the article but I sure enjoyed the pictures. More!
SCUDDER GRAYBEAL
Alameda, Calif.

Sirs:
Congratulations on the article on swimsuit fashions. It was certainly welcome on these cold Wisconsin nights. Bravo! And more of the same.
RON RECK
Platteville, Wis.

Sirs:
In my opinion SI wasted 10 pages of an issue which could have contained more coverage of the bowl games. It was, all in all, a very disappointing issue.
WILLIAM H. MacINTOSH
Anaheim, Calif.

Sirs:
Please cancel my subscription now. I thought SI was a man's magazine of sport, not a woman's fashion magazine. By the way, I've been to Hawaii and I didn't see bathing suits like that.
M. FROOME GAYLE
Simi, Calif.

Sirs:
I would like to express my utter disgust for your article and photographs, Sand, Surf, and New Swimwear. They are most distasteful and unfit.
MRS. ROBBIE EMERSON
Bexar, Ala.

Sirs:
I love it when you publish articles that contain pictures of girls wearing revealing bathing suits, such as your recent article about Hawaii. Not that the articles and the pictures are that great, but I enjoy reading the letters that you publish two weeks later from overprotective mothers and repressive librarians who threaten to cancel their subscriptions because of the "obscene" pictures. Keep up the good work!
W.C. YOUNG
Bryn Mawr, Pa.

Sirs:
In anticipation of any objections to the swimsuit pictures in the Jan. 12 issue, I offer my support to the girls. Two cheers.
WILLIAM Y. CARTER
New York City

ROSES FOR ROZELLE
Sirs:
Wham-bam, Hank Stram.
Foul ball, Tex Maule.
ROBERT WALKER
Johnson City, Tenn.

Sirs:
As an AFL fan since the league's inception, I can only say that all the roses must go to Pete Rozelle for absorbing the AFL before it absorbed him and all of professional football.
JOHN KELSO
San Angelo, Texas

ANOTHER CHANNEL
Sirs:
After having read the first two articles of your series on television's effect on sport (Dec. 22 et seq.), I'd say the insinuation that television is an ogre that will ultimately destroy sport is quite clear. You say that attendance drops, and eventual decline and fall of minor league baseball, small boxing clubs, etc., are directly attributable to television's encroachment. You also make note of the fact that the point has now been reached whereby commercial time outs arc called for in plain view for all to see whenever the producer decides he needs one.

I feel that the television industry is being unjustly blamed for all of this, and here is why. No major league club owner or fight promoter has ever had his arm twisted to allow television coverage of his event. In fact, you must agree that the prime reason for the numerous franchise shifts and expansion moves has been the larger television market. (Ask the people in Milwaukee about that.) Trying to fill anywhere from 80 to 90 broadcast hours a week is an immense task. To fill those hours, television turned to sporting events. But, again, no owner or promoter was ever forced to allow his event to be televised. They were offered money, and they accepted. Television is a money-making business and has never tried to deny it. Can baseball say the same?

Concerning the number of time outs in a football game, the average game lasts 2½ hours, or about 150 minutes. Nineteen commercial minutes figure out to be approximately 12½% of the total broadcast time. Compare that to the percentage of advertising copy in your magazine.

Finally, how many people in their lifetime would ever see a World Series, a Kentucky Derby or an Olympics were it not for television? And free, yet. Ask the touring golf pros what the prize money would be. Ask the NFL club owners what their profit and loss sheets would be. Better yet, ask the AFL club owners where they would even be!

Why not put the blame where it solely belongs—on the shoulders of the club owners and officials? Give television the credit, for a change, for bringing the spectacle of sport to everyone. Give it credit for allowing the guy in Eddyville, Iowa to see the Super Bowl as well as the guy who can afford a plane trip to New Orleans and is fortunate enough to know someone who can get him a ticket. And don't forget the sponsor that shells out one hundred grand a minute to make it all possible.
LEONARD LEVIN
Executive Producer
WFIL-TV
Philadelphia

ADO ABOUT J.U.
Sirs:
I want to congratulate you on your fine article on the Jacksonville Dolphins (Up, Up and Away Go Artis and New J.U., Jan. 5). There is only one point that needs clarifying. Jacksonville University has not just come out of junior college status. It became a university 14 years ago.
MAURICE FELDMAN
President 1968
Student Government
Washington

Sirs:
Mr. Jares wastes no time in his article in attacking the Bold New City of the South. He also makes note of the fact that "the St. Johns River is pretty but polluted." There is not a major river in the United States that is not polluted to some degree. He comments that "Singer Connie Haines comes from there (and has rarely gone back)." How relevant is this to an article about J.U. basketball? Besides, a great number of people seldom, if ever, return to their home towns. So what bearing does this have on a city's status? None, whatsoever. Mr. Jares must have dug deep to find the things he wrote, when it would have been in better taste to compliment Jacksonville, rather than condemn it.
STEVE MATCHETT
Jacksonville

Sirs:
I am not a native Floridian so you can rest assured that this is not a true grit speaking, but I do feel that J.U. and the city of Jacksonville were not given a fair shake in your article. You failed to mention all of the improvements that have taken place here in the past decade. Jacksonville has become one of the finest ports in the entire Southeast. Our Gator Bowl is becoming a fine sport complex. And Jacksonville is the insurance center of the South.

As for our "transformed junior college"—it, too, is a well-defined center of education. So good that it has attracted many students from the North, who seem to enjoy the pleasure of Florida living. The Dolphins have come a long way since their inception, and we all feel that they deserve all of the credit and support that the people of Jacksonville are giving them.
MRS. JOSEPH SHEIL
Jacksonville

ALL-STAR HIGH SCHOOL
Sirs:
I couldn't help but write when the All-NFL All-Star list was published with Roman Gabriel and Sonny Jurgensen as the top quarterbacks in the league (A Game Within a Game, Dec. 22). I just wanted to boast that these two greats graduated from the same high school and that both were coached by the same great coach, Leon Brogden.

New Hanover High School of Wilmington, N.C. is the only high school in the nation to claim two starting quarterbacks in the current ranks of professional football and is indeed proud of these great alumni.
JAN DAVIS
Wilmington, N.C.

SUPER CIRCLE
Sirs:
The Dec. 22 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED carried the pictorial story of new stadiums (The Snorting Sixties as Sculptured in Concrete). But your caption, "San Diego Stadium ($27.5 million) was constructed primarily with football in mind, and baseball attendance suggests the priority was correct," indicates a lack of knowledge and research of this and other stadiums recently constructed.

As is the case with all multipurpose stadiums, a compromise must be made in order to provide for football and baseball. There can be no disagreement with the fact that Anaheim, Candlestick Park and Dodger Stadium are designed for baseball (football rarely being played in any of them). San Diego Stadium, however, is a 50-50 compromise, and the lack of Padre baseball attendance is due to a weak expansion team, whereas the football team has developed into an exciting contender. Padre attendance will increase when the quality of events increases.

San Diego's "super circle" shape provides more seating closer to the action than any other multipurpose stadium that has been built in a circular form similar to Atlanta, which the article stated "leaves fans quite far away." Other stadiums do provide movable stands, which permit a small number of fans to be close to the action.

Incidentally, the actual construction cost of the San Diego Stadium was $16.5 million, and it received a national AIA design honor award (first for a major stadium), indicating not only its functional excellence but its esthetic magnificence as well.
ERNEST R. LORD, AIA
Director of Production
Frank L. Hope & Associates
Architects and Engineers
San Diego

THE WIFE AND KIDS
Sirs:
I feel compelled to write to you to tell you that, although I've been married only three months, I have serious competition—SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Upon its arrival I moan, knowing full well that it will be impossible to even try to communicate with my husband for the following three days or until he has read it from cover to cover, no matter how long it takes.

I've tried hiding it, destroying it, throwing it away and throwing tantrums, but nothing works. If he can't find it he simply buys another copy. Would it be possible to publish monthly? Weekly is too much for me to bear. Unfortunately he just renewed his subscription for two more years. HELP!
MAURA JONES
Chestnut Hill, Mass.

Sirs:
During the recent holiday season a group of second-graders in the Laboratory School of Kansas State Teachers College were writing statements indicating what they were personally thankful for. I thought perhaps you might be interested in the enclosed statement (below).
ARTHUR D. BRILL
Director
Emporia, Kans.

PHOTO

Address editorial mail to TIME & LIFE Bldg., Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

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