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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

June 15, 1970
June 15, 1970

Table of Contents
June 15, 1970

Epsom-Belmont
  • The theme songs were different at Epsom and Belmont, but the theme was the same—classic competition among the best thoroughbred colts available. Plenty were available at Epsom Downs, in any case

Boo-Boo Or Baby
Freshman And Guru

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

WHEELS' DEALS
Sirs:
Re This Saint Has Been Called a Sinner (June 1), it is very difficult for me to believe that Ernie (Wheels) Wheelwright is or ever has been associated with Mafia types. I soldiered with Ernie in a platoon of the 101st Airborne Division (the Screaming Eagles) during the years 1961-63 and got to know him quite well. Ernie undoubtedly can make it—without the "help" of undesirable types.
LEWIS McRAE
Grand Turk Island, B.W.I.

This is an article from the June 15, 1970 issue Original Layout

Sirs:
You refer to Ernie as a "30-year-old, second-string running back." The way I see it, "Old Ernie" isn't figuring on playing any football next year and is taking advantage of an opportunity to get plenty of free publicity for his Central Park South.
THOMAS A. COOKE
Jeannette, Pa.

THREE OUT OF FOUR
Sirs:
At least somewhere in New York there is someone (Walter Bingham) who knows where the Cubs really stand (Say It Again, Rube! June 1). Congratulations on an excellent article.
NEIL BRANDON
Middletown, N.Y.

Sirs:
Walter Bingham's article on the Cubs-Mets games was completely one-sided. Sure the Cubs beat the Mets three out of four, but he doesn't have to write it up as though it was the World Series.
JOHN LaROCCA
Akron

Sirs:
All I can say is, "Poor you" is right, Chicago.
ROBERT MOSELEY
Ridgefield, Conn.

FLICKERING PHILLIES
Sirs:
In the article concerning the return of Richie Allen to Philadelphia (Candles Are Burning Low in Philly, June 1), you made a special point of telling how he beat his former teammates with those hits of his. How about telling the other half of the story? During the game on Sunday (May 24) Philadelphia pitchers struck out Mr. Allen five times.
JANICE MAZUR
Wilmington, Del.

FRANK ASSESSMENTS
Sirs:
Well, King Beard, seemingly needing no help from Dick Schaap, proceeded in a cutting and tactless display that certainly made no friends (The Best of Them Burn and Bum, June 1). On the contrary, Frank must have wiped out even the little "pitter-patters" of applause he receives (received) in one fell swoop. The crushing blow, of course, was a borrowed phrase about Palmer being over the hill, over 40 and lacking desire. Beard did manage to thank Palmer for the money he has brought to the pro golf tour. Beard has a heart of gold.

Leaving Palmer wounded and bleeding to death, Frank blatantly suggests that Jack Nicklaus win one out of every three tournaments, an impossible feat these days with so many good young golfers, and then he proceeds to deliver a cruel blow to Gary Player. Beard never mentions Player's dedication or golfing ability but only elaborates on Gary's regard for his health.

However, because Frank Beard still commands respect as an excellent golfer, even the most irate fans should afford him a second chance. I hope he takes advantage of it.
JIMMY BROOKS
Greenville, S.C.

Sirs:
Frank Beard's definition of a nice guy certainly doesn't apply to himself. He should have called his book "Jealousy on the Golf Tour." His reference to Arnold Palmer's "unmannerly" fans is as offensive as anything my children and I have read in your magazine. I hope his children don't read it.
SALLY ANN McELHEARN
Jamaica Estates, N.Y.

Sirs:
Who does Beard think he is? Does he feel that spectators should have to pass "Cliff Roberts' Test of Regulations" to empathize a little on weekends? I think Beard would like to have a subsidized tour—no spectators needed; he'll call the folks and tell them the results. Beard should understand that he can't have it all. He's either got to be thankful for a superstar bringing out the gang, or he's got to be satisfied to play in $20,000 tournaments—in silence.
ART DLUGACH
San Francisco

Sirs:
The Frank Beard series was very interesting and enjoyable reading. He has candidly shown the pressures facing all golfers on the tour, as well as a remarkable insight into the styles and lives of the great golfers, himself included.
DONA PANAGAKIS
Syracuse, N.Y.

HOPE FOR HOPKINS
Sirs:
Congratulations on your article on the 1970 Virginia lacrosse team (One Team, Anyway, Says, Yes, Virginia, May 25). It is undoubtedly a fine team with some excellent players (e.g., Tom Duquette) but it upsets me to see you once again ignoring Johns Hopkins. Hopkins lost three All-Americas last year, and this year was not given any chance of winning or even sharing a fourth straight national championship. Yet Hopkins decisively beat Navy (the team Virginia lost to) as well as Army, considered to be the best team in the country. Virginia does not even play Army. Upon reflection maybe you will come to see that Hopkins, and not Virginia, is "the best of this spring's championship trio." If not, we can wait, since Hopkins used only three seniors against Army, Navy and Maryland and we possess probably the two best sophomore midfielders in the country in Gary Handleman and Eric Bergofsky.
BRENT RICKS
Baltimore

K & K
Sirs:
As an oldtime Yankee fan, I read with enjoyment and nostalgia Jerry Kirshenbaum's article on Charlie Keller (Keeping 'em Down on the Farm, May 18). It reminded me of two stories about Charlie that I think might be of interest:

1) He was, to my knowledge, the first player to insist that cash collected for a day in his honor be used to set up a scholarship fund. The cash from Charlie Keller Day went to his alma mater, the University of Maryland.

2) When Red Rolfe, then the Tiger manager, hired Keller as a coach, he explained his choice in approximately these words: "He's a used-to-winning, class Yankee and that should be a help to any ball club!"

A good man, Charles K! A good piece, Jerry K.
JOSEPH E. MACKEY
New York City

Sirs:
During World War II it was my privilege to command a U.S. Navy gun crew on a merchant ship which had Charlie Keller as its maritime purser. Needless to say, a few ocean crossings in the confines of a relatively small ship give one an opportunity to learn many things about one's fellow man. Frequent philosophical interchanges, many reflections on the values of sports participation and a daily cribbage encounter gave me an opportunity to know the greatness of Keller. His desire to win, his competitive spirit, his willingness to sacrifice for a better performance and his use of strategy and insight were all couched in a framework of fair play.

Please accept my sincere thanks for painting the picture of a true champion.
JACK B. DAUGHERTY
Bloomington, Ind.

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