19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 06, 1970

RICK BARRY VS. VIRGINIA
Sirs:
Peter Carry's article on Rick Barry (Yes, Rick, There Is a Virginia, Aug. 24) is very good. I used to like Barry, but when he jumped to the ABA I didn't think much of him. Living where I do, I don't see much major league ball, and when the former Caps moved to Virginia I was really glad to hear it, especially because they had Barry, Charlie Scott and Doug Moe. But what Barry had to say about Virginia was a slur on the whole South. Maybe Barry doesn't like the Southern way of talking but he has no reason to cut us down. If he does come down here we'll boo him right to Alaska and see how he likes it up there!
JACK EDGE
Moyock, N.C.

Sirs:
My heart bleeds when I consider the burdensome problems of Rick Barry. His crying about a contractual obligation of his own making should forewarn Franklin Mieuli as to the kind of loyalty he is trying to repurchase. Instead of worrying about his son's enunciation Barry would best consider whether his son can respect a father who evades the responsibilities he has accepted "out in front of God and everyone."
TONY OSBON
Staten Island, N.Y.

Sirs:
As a Virginian I am thrilled to have the Squires in my state. As for Mr. Barry, we wouldn't want to make him unhappy! Let him sit in that spectacular house in Oakland for two seasons, then let the Warriors have him. For their sake I hope he'll grow up in that time, but I wouldn't bet on it.
SANDRA MUNARI
Richmond

Sirs:
It seems Rick Barry left his manners as well as his heart in San Francisco.
JO ANN GUINAN
Drexel Hill, Pa.

Sirs:
I have a great suggestion for Rick the Mouth. Why doesn't he buy a basketball team of his own? On second thought, why doesn't he buy California?
DONALD ROSE
Fredericksburg, Va.

BATTERS UP!
Sirs:
I would like to congratulate William Leggett for bringing out of the darkness a two-time batting champ, Tony Oliva (A Full Series for a Fleet Pair, Aug. 24). He is also a fine man off the field; his kind are hard to find. Chalk one up for the underrated ballplayers. By the way, the picture of Tony O. was marvelous.
TONY STRANIERO JR.
Gates Mills, Ohio

Sirs:
A great article on Carl Yastrzemski and Tony Oliva, two very fine American League batting champs. Yaz is having another year of the kind that gave him the Triple Crown in 1967. I'd like to see a National Leaguer do that!
JOSEPH DECARLO
East Meadow, N.Y.

POINTS OF VIEW
Sirs:
Dan Jenkins' account of the PGA (The One That Got Away Again, Aug. 24) was a masterpiece of poor taste. His portrayal of Dave Stockton, a fine young pro, as a weekend hacker who won through pure luck was uncalled for. I also find it hard to share Dan's tears for "poor" Arnie Palmer—a millionaire who has everything but the PGA championship. Jenkins should apologize.
WILLIAM H. WILSON
San Bernardino, Calif.

Sirs:
Frank Beard was right (LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER, May 18). The media usually tell about the big-name player who lost instead of telling about the person who won.
STEVEN STEIN
Livingston, N.J.

Sirs:
If Dan Jenkins would devote more of his time to describing the play, the players and the course rather than his ideas on the prestige of the club his articles would be more interesting. I am sure the good folks at Columbine, Pecan Valley and other PGA Championship host clubs put in too much time, money and hard work to merit the criticisms Jenkins so lavishly lays upon them.

Does it occur to Jenkins that the British Open, when held at St. Andrews, is played on a public course down by the railroad tracks? Perhaps Columbine, et al. failed to serve Mr. Jenkins a champagne breakfast in air-conditioned comfort. And speaking of prestige, what docs he think of the clubs that have so much prestige they would not even tolerate the PGA being held on their hallowed grounds?
W. P. BRATTEN
San Antonio

Sirs:
To me the 1970 PGA was again a big ho-hum.
GARY ELLER
Idaho Falls, Idaho

NO POINTS
Sirs:
After reading your account of the 1970 Curtis Cup matches (British Bombers Downed by U.S. Spitfires, Aug. 17) we, as members of the U.S. team, feel it necessary to express our feelings. Some of the most important and rewarding experiences of this event were totally overlooked.

First, the goal of the Curtis Cup is "to stimulate friendly rivalry among women golfers of many lands." We believe this goal was definitely achieved. Second, the final score does not tell an accurate story. Several of the matches were decided on the 18th hole. Had these matches gone to our challengers the end result could have been very different.

We feel the matches can best be summed up not as long hitters vs. short hitters or big girls vs. small girls, or even individuals vs. individuals, but rather as a friendly rivalry among women golfers of three lands.
MARTHA WILKINSON
JANE BASTANCHURY
CYNTHIA HILL
South Haven, Mich.

Sirs:
Mark Mulvoy forsook accuracy and good manners in his description of the British-Irish team. Not only were the girls gracious and attractive, several of them would do justice to a bikini—something I defy a "draft choice for the Boston Patriots" to attempt. They also played superb golf. Mr. Mulvoy won no points at all.
EMILY A. MOODY
Darien, Conn.

OF SCORES AND SCORERS
Sirs:
I cannot help but comment on James Van Alen's gushing endorsements of the adoption of his ridiculous VASSS tennis scoring methods to break tie games (19TH HOLE, Aug. 17). I am afraid that the proponents of this system forget that there are many things in life that only a boor wants to rush through. They forget that there are times—in situations where two well-matched players bump heads (or rackets!)—when the only fair measure of the players' equality or inequality is the 19-17 or 22-20 set. In playing such a set not only is the man's skill tested but also his endurance and his ability to pace himself. In the Tilden days there were many matches of the five-set variety that were won on shrewd analysis of the opponent's stamina, which is part of any active sport.

Since the VASSS people want to get things over in such a hurry, I would like to suggest an even quicker resolution of tie games: Why not simply flip a coin and get it over with in one-tenth of a second? They might stretch it to half a second by making it three out of five.
G. M. KOSOLAPOFF
Auburn, Ala.

Sirs:
I have had the opportunity to be a linesman in local tennis tournaments for more than 20 years and I was delighted to have the chance to serve as linesman at the recent Western Open tennis tournament in Cincinnati mentioned in SCORECARD (Aug. 17). You described the behavior of the players in this and other Pepsi Grand Prix circuit tourneys as "bad manners." My sympathy is still with most of the players. The linesmen and ball boys make too many unnecessary movements that cause the players' attention to be diverted. Further, the linesmen and the ball boys disrupt the tempo of the game by not getting into position quickly.

Linesmen do and will make bad calls. But instead of shouting "Correction!" and making the proper call, they sit and ignore the situation they create.

Finally, many linesmen are not vocal. They may signal that the ball is out or good, but they fail to shout their out calls for the benefit of the players and umpire. An extreme example of this occurred at the finals of the U.S. professional tennis championship recently.

One solution would be to require that linesmen meet set standards of knowledge and recent experience. After all, the players do not play just once or twice a year, yet too often their success is dependent upon a linesman who may call the lines at only one tournament. The linesman should prepare himself in local tournaments prior to officiating at the more important events.
PERRY C. GRIER
Middletown, Ohio

INTERESTING THEORY
Sirs:
Gilbert Cant's article, The Curious Case of the Copper Band (Aug. 3), was most intriguing (I am wearing one now myself, so far without any appreciable effect). Toward the end of his article Mr. Cant mentions the role of aspirin in the treatment of arthritis, and goes on to say that its action is not understood and that any doctor who says he knows how it works "is as bad as a quack." Mr. Cant might be interested in an article that appeared in the May 1966 issue of Scientific American. Entitled "Chelation in Medicine," it is a study of the action in the body of various "chelating" agents (molecules that are able to bind metal ions in a clawlike grip—the word is from the Greek for claw—and deliver them to body tissues).

In the course of his article the author, Jack Schubert, discusses his work at the Argonne National Laboratory, during which he investigated the chelating properties of a number of compounds, including aspirin. Mr. Schubert's experimentation with aspirin led to the conclusion that its pain-relieving effects were largely due to its ability to capture copper released into the blood under stress, and to deliver it to the copper-starved cells in other tissues of the body.
A. G. WILLIAMS
Toronto

•An ingenious and plausible hypothesis, but it still doesn't enable your family doctor to tell you exactly how aspirin works for you—ED.

TURNED ON
Sirs:
I thoroughly enjoyed the article on Artist Thomas Hart Benton and the Buffalo River (The Old Man and the River, Aug. 10). Now I must make the canoe trip down the Buffalo. Thanks to Robert F Jones for turning me on to such a beautiful thing.
JOHN B. ELSTROTT JR.
New Orleans

Sirs:
I was thrilled to find your article. My son and I floated the Buffalo River (Gilbert to Buffalo State Park) in company with Harold Hedges. However, none of the persons in our party used or consumed any liquor or beer and none used profane language as used in this article. I think putting the names of Harold and Margaret Hedges in this context does these fine Christian people an injustice.

Please continue your excellent coverage and especially stories about canoe trips but elevate your language standards.
KENNETH E. PEERY
Concordia, Kans.

Sirs:
I liked your article. Artist Benton is extremely colorful. By the way, when are your "gaw damn" college football predictions coming out?
JIM BURNETT
Birmingham, Ala.

•Next week, by gum—ED.

Address editorial mail to TIME & LIFE Bldg., Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)