19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

November 09, 1970

TOXIC POLLUTANTS
Sirs:
It was past time for SI to step forward with its article Poison Roams Our Coastal Seas (Oct. 26). The deadly pollution that is wreaking havoc on our coastal waters and their inhabitants comes almost exclusively from economic ventures, whether they be industrial plants or farmers taking care of their crops. As we all know, it is difficult to appeal to someone when his pocketbook is at stake. Only with the help of the molders of public opinion, such as magazines like SI, can we have an effective response to this tragic situation.

Two basic problems are involved in the caretaking of our coastal waters. The first is their salvation. The second is the preservation of the creatures that inhabit them. Tons of seafood are taken each year from our estuaries, bays and other coastal areas. It is evident that we are daily reducing the amount of edible seafood in these waters. Should the reproduction of these creatures now be made impossible by toxic pollutants because of our carelessness and stupidity this seafood could be lost forever.

My sincere thanks for your article.
TOM BEASLEY
Austin, Texas

Sirs:
The presentation of clear, candid, well-documented articles such as those that have appeared in your magazine will hopefully open more eyes to the unchecked damage to our natural surroundings.

It is perhaps significant to note that most people in this country still look upon pollution as simply an unfortunate annoyance and not as an imminent threat to all life on this planet. If our elected officials and government agencies are ever to act meaningfully on behalf of our environment, it must be in response to a feeling of urgency generated by an enlightened populace.
MARK RABIN
Freeport, N.Y.

Sirs:
Thank you, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. As a graduate student in chemistry I appreciate not only your interest in publicizing ecological problems, but also your having funded a study. Until more nongovernment groups are willing to spend money to find out what is wrong with our environment and to publicize their findings, little will be done to eliminate the causes of pollution.
GEORGIA WEINSTEIN
Cambridge, Mass.

Sirs:
Like Dr. Robert F. Smolker, State University of New York ecologist, I am horrified by some of the data you have published. As an ardent fisherman I congratulate Robert H. Boyle et al But there is more the public can do. It can and should demand that the use of these harmful and persistent chemicals be halted—now.
JOSEPH F. JENNINGS
Miami

SEASON OPENERS
Sirs:
Congratulations on your preview of pro basketball's 25th season (Oct. 26). It was all very good, except for the remarks you made about Jim Barnett and the Portland Trailblazers. Barnett must have turned from an All-Flake into an All-Great, because he averaged 20.9 points (with rookie Geoff Petrie close behind) during the preseason play.
KENT WESTPHAL
Salem, Ore.

Sirs:
I cannot see how you can predict that Milwaukee will run away with it in the NBA's Midwestern Division. Milwaukee has the edge, but Detroit isn't far behind.
RICH ODDO
Middletown, N.J.

Sirs:
Milwaukee's Big O is not big enough to handle the Knicks.
ROSS GITTELL
Forest Hills, N.Y.

Sirs:
Having chased the Knicks across the country half a dozen times last season, I was astonished at how well Douglas Gorsline captured the feeling of pro basketball. He has portrayed in six paintings what no man could describe in 600 pages.
JEFFREY DENBERG
Executive Sports Editor
The Miami News
Miami

ARMSTRONG'S SUSPENSION
Sirs:
Throughout my association with professional basketball I have had nothing but the highest regard for the accuracy in the reporting of your magazine. However, in the SCORECARD section of your Oct. 26 issue you state that Warren Armstrong was suspended by me for his activities in regard to the formation of a black union. This is a gross error. The problems that existed between this franchise and Warren Armstrong were totally unrelated to color, and any inference of a color problem does a great injustice and disservice to Warren Armstrong as well as to the Kentucky Colonels.
MIKE STOREN
President
Kentucky Colonels
Louisville

LINEMAN
Sirs:
I feel that you overlooked an obvious choice in your selection of the Lineman of the Week for your Oct. 19 issue. Jeff Siemon of Stanford received the honor after a fine performance of eight assists and seven unassisted tackles while taking part in a mild upset. Dick Biddle of Duke, however, made 14 unassisted tackles and 16 assists in a major upset over previously unbeaten West Virginia. Moreover, Biddle was hampered by a back injury. I feel that an inspired performance such as his definitely deserves SI's recognition.
ROBERT B. MARSHALL
Durham, N.C.

HANDS DOWN
Sirs:
I was interested in Bill Pryce's suggestion that football players who commit a foul be required to identify themselves (SCORECARD, Oct. 12). Either pro football is becoming more brutal, or television, with its instant replays and closeups, is making the violence of the game more apparent. This was brought home to me during the Detroit-Chicago game. Early in the game Mel Farr ran for a short gain and was tackled. As he was going down, he received an extraneous forearm blow to his back. The instant replay clearly showed this blatant foul.

Perhaps a limit of major fouls should be imposed on football players, as in basketball. This would certainly reduce the number of penalties and perhaps also the number of permanent injuries being suffered by players of this game.
HANK MEYERS
Hermosa Beach, Calif.

Sirs:
Bill Pryce's suggested rule change might reduce the number of penalties, but it could also reduce the number of football players. Just imagine a situation like this: you're at Franklin Field and the seldom victorious Eagles are putting together a drive for the go-ahead score. The clock shows 20 seconds but a holding penalty is called, putting them out of field-goal range. What do you think will happen when the guilty Eagle lineman holds up his hand in front of 60,000 desperate fans?

Forget the idea, we would rather use our imagination. Besides, it might be a favorite player, and that wouldn't be good at all.
JOHN CUNNINGHAM
Philadelphia

Sirs:
The center snaps the ball and the quarterback fades back to pass. The center grabs a blitzing linebacker to prevent a crushed quarterback and a poor grade after the week's film analysis. An alert referee catches the infraction and throws his flag. But in his desire to keep visual contact with the offender so that he can ask him to hold up his hand, the official fails to note that the defensive end has been holding the offensive tight end to keep him from running his pattern.

Down with Mr. Pryce's suggestion.
ERNEST B. PRICE
Hays, Kans.

Sirs:
To enlighten Bill Pryce, it is an unwritten rule that the captain or coach may learn the identity of a football player committing a personal foul simply by inquiring of the official making the call.
SEYMOUR STEINMAN, D.D.S.
Member
Eastern Association of Intercollegiate Football Officials
Scranton, Pa

Address editorial mail to TIME & LIFE Bldg., Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)