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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Dec. 07, 1970
Dec. 07, 1970

Table of Contents
Dec. 7, 1970

Mellow Wine
Rams
Buddy
Mini-Race
College Football

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

THE BUFFALO'S LAST STAND
Sirs:
Bil Gilbert's article about Arizona's appalling buffalo massacre (The Great Buffalo Hunt? Shoot? Slaughter? Nov. 23) is the best (maybe I should say worst) story I've seen in some time. It was a tremendous shock to me to find out that such a thing could go on in this day and age, especially under the auspices of the government. It should trouble the consciences of all concerned to allow this outrage to continue. It seems sad to me that man, who is supposed to be civilized, should be able to find either sport or thrill in slaughtering the helpless buffalo, one of America's most magnificent, misunderstood and endangered species.
STEVE SOULE
Corvallis, Ore.

This is an article from the Dec. 7, 1970 issue Original Layout

Sirs:
Bil Gilbert's article made me sick. If the buffalo must be slaughtered, why not shoot them in pens with shotgun slugs rather than allow them to be cut down piece by piece by people who have difficulty hitting the side of a barn?
CONRAD ROSS
Howard Beach, N.Y.

Sirs:
The 474 gunners who applied for the chance to shoot 80 excess buffalo in Arizona would probably love to go to India to shoot surplus people.
KENNETH BODEN
Albany, N.Y.

Sirs:
If the buffalo herd must be thinned commensurate with the available forage, there is nothing morally wrong with the method used. It just should not be considered a hunt or a sport, because the element that makes the pursuit of game a challenge is missing.
HARRY CANTEY
Kingston, Tenn.

Sirs:
Aren't there other states that could use the buffalo to create or bolster herds of their own?
ARTHUR O'DONNELL
Bayonne, N.J.

Sirs:
What a tragedy! Why doesn't the state of Arizona appeal for funds to feed the extra buffalo? If we knew where to send money I'm sure we could save them.
TONY AKEY
Westport, Conn.

Sirs:
The best shots of the day were taken by the author, and I hope they were noted.
KENNETH BERMAN
West Palm Beach, Fla.

VIKING'S RETURN
Sirs:
Please extend my thanks to William Johnson for an article Hey Adventures of a Viking Grandson, Nov. 16) that does more to capture the spirit and quality of the Nordic people than any I have read. It brings back many fond memories of my boyhood in Norway and a most intense desire to return to a land that had the foresight to strengthen its ecological awareness. Hjertelig tusen takk!
ARNULF LOHREN SVENDSEN, M.D.
San Francisco

STOP-ACTION
Sirs:
My admiration for the cartoons of Michael Ramus knows no bounds, and he has captured the spirit of hockey in the most remarkable way (The Game Behind the Whistle, Nov. 23). However, as my friend the world-famous referee (below) might point out, the linesman who flashes down the rink after an icing call delivers the puck to his fellow linesman and not to the referee.
CHARLES M. SCHULZ
Sebastopol, Calif.

Sirs:
A tremendous round of applause is due Michael Ramus for his satirical and witty portrayal of hockey players and officials. The facial expressions were superb, as was the action. I certainly hope to see more of Mr. Ramus' work in the weeks to come.
JACK QUIGLEY
Chelsea, Mass.

GENERATION GAP
Sirs:
As a Denver Bronco fan I would like to make a strong protest against a pro football rule that forces young players to compete against older, mature men. On Nov. 15 a 43-year-old quarterback from Oakland came into the game in the last four minutes and took his team 80 yards in six plays to beat us. He does things like this all the time. He has 21 years of pro experience; some of his opponents aren't much older than that. This is unfair. I suggest that this fellow, George something-or-other, be sent to Siberia, inducted into the Hall of Fame—or traded to our team.
FRANK A. WELDER
Denver

Sirs:
WANTED: George Blanda, age 43, 6'2", 215 pounds. This man is wanted in Denver, Kansas City and, especially, Cleveland. He formerly operated out of Chicago and Houston. He is now hiding in Oakland. He possesses a rifle arm and a big boot and is considered very, very dangerous. He has a long record dating back to 1949, and he always works with a group of 10 other men, all younger than himself.
GELLY MILLER
Piedmont, Calif.

Sirs:
Let George Do It—And He Does (Nov. 23) by Tex Maule was a well-written article on an old pro. George Blanda has captured the hearts of all 40-year-old men. He has become a hero of my father. Good show, George, keep it up.
BOB HANNA
Auburn, Mass.

HEEL AND TOE
Sirs:
Your article about walker Dave Romansky (Blue Collar Walker, Nov. 23) certainly points out the determination and sacrifice necessary to achieve excellence in any field. However, I feel the implied condemnation of Dave's employer, Du Pont, was totally unfair. Olympic track is amateur competition. In fact, if Du Pont were to extend special consideration to Mr. Romansky and, in effect, employ him as a walker, could not his amateur status be compromised?
PAUL STEVENS
Belchertown, Mass.

Sirs:
A YMCA that deprives youngsters of the inspiration and talent of a Dave Romansky because he lacks a college degree has failed in its main duty to provide young people with leaders to look up to and emulate. A firm such as Du Pont that cannot afford to pay a man who presents the positive image of our country in competition that Dave Romansky does for the few days a year that he takes off above and beyond his allotted vacation has more than demonstrated a narrowness of policy.
NEIL WASSERMAN
Brooklyn

Sirs:
Thank you for the long overdue recognition of race-walker Dave Romansky. His plight is the classic example of what an outdated amateur code can do to the life of a man who wants to compete for his country. If the U.S. fails to realign its amateur sights the Romanskys of America will be driven out of competition.

By the way, Dave's dedication extends to coaching as well. He competes and coaches for the Delaware Track & Field Club. Over Thanksgiving weekend he took eight girls, ranging from 8 to 18, to the national AAU cross-country races in St. Louis.
ROBERT V. BEHR, Vice-President
Delaware Track & Field Club, Inc.
Wilmington, Del.

CLARIFICATIONS
Sirs:
I would like to clarity my remarks of several weeks ago, which were quoted in SCORECARD (Nov. 9) with specific reference to Jerry Lucas. The point I was making concerning no-cut, no-trade contracts was that they result in instant security for the players, which in turn results in stifled motivation, desire and dedication in an endeavor that demands these intangibles for success. 1 stated that players unconsciously did not get the most out of their abilities when this additional challenge was removed.

The question was asked of me by the interviewer if Jerry Lucas was an example of this, since he had stated recently that he had lost 20 pounds, had worked out all summer and was ready to have his best year. My response was that it was highly possible that Jerry could play better this year unencumbered by financial problems and able to concentrate completely on basketball.

I frankly am ashamed of myself for allowing any other interpretation to be placed on my words. And I agree completely with Pepper Wilson's point (19TH HOLE, NOV. 23) that Jerry Lucas' performance over the past nine years has been outstanding. In my experience Jerry has always been a gentleman and a fine basketball player whose record in sports speaks for itself.
BOB COUSY, Coach
Cincinnati Royals
Cincinnati

•See page 16.—ED.

Sirs:
Pepper Wilson began his letter by saying, "All too often we are prone to make comments without doing our homework." He then stated that Jerry Lucas was only the second player in NBA history to average both 20 points and 20 rebounds in a single season.

Wilt Chamberlain and Bob Pettit both achieved this feat during the 1960-61 season, and since Jerry followed these two into the league he would be the third. Pepper Wilson was general manager of the Cincinnati team at that time.
JIM BENAGH
Englewood, N.J.

JOE & CARROLL & DON
Sirs:
Fifteen yards to Carroll Rosenbloom for unsportsmanlike conduct (The Rosenbloom-Robbie Bowl, Nov. 9)! In a day and age when football owners do their Christmas horse trading at will, not to mention Charles O. Finley's annual Dial-A-Manager telethon, methinks I hear the sounds of a man who is about to land on the floor where the rug used to be.

I nominate cantankerous Carroll for the 1970-71 They Can Dish It Out But They Can't Take It award.
BOB MOORE
Santa Rosa, Calif.

Sirs:
Jack Olsen's story about the Rosenbloom-Robbie Bowl includes a gratuitous comment: "The casual visitor to the grimy working-man's town called Baltimore...." Olsen obviously was a casual visitor—and an irresponsible one. Kissing off somebody else's city is good copy, but without supporting evidence it is reprehensible. Certainly parts of Baltimore fit the Olsen description, as do parts of Boston, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Detroit or—forgive me—New York. Other parts, as in other cities, are captivating or even beautiful. Did Olsen ever stroll through Charles Center, Bolton Hill or Cross Keys or look across the city from the top of Federal Hill?

Baltimore's curse is not that it is grimy, bu that it is that "other" city between New York and Washington. Its economic survival depends on shedding the image imposed by people who know nothing about it. Olsen's puerile comment, read by hundreds of thousands of people, sustains an impression that takes money out of our pockets and, speaking for two million Baltimoreans, I resent it.
GWINN OWENS
Ruxton, Md.

ILLUSTRATIONTm. Reg. U.S. Pat Off.—All rights reserved ¬© 1970 by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

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