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Contents

Nov. 01, 1971
Nov. 01, 1971

Table of Contents
Nov. 1, 1971

How They Run
Cross-Country
College Football
  • While the Notre Dame varsity was getting lumped at South Bend, the first-year men were south of the Rio Grande bullying the Mexico City Redskins in a bruising display of hands—and arms, etc.—across the border

Football's Week
Hockey
Butcher-Birds
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

Contents

22 How They Do Run on
A stampede of college football backs grabs both ball and spotlight away from the passers

This is an article from the Nov. 1, 1971 issue

26 A Back Door into the Big Time
Signed under special hardship and dropout dispensations, some flashy pro rookies will play now and study later

28 This Polish Joke Is on the Browns
Denver shut out Cleveland, due in part to a home-cooked Polish meal served the hungry Broncos

30 Mud Flies All Over the Track
A mysterious man of many names causes an investigation that has horse racing cringing and the NFL concerned

32 "When I Am World Champion"
He is not yet the best racing driver on earth, but Sam Posey's ambitions are just that lofty

38 Lions in Cattle Country
The excellence of Texas high school football is tradition—and Brown wood is fanatically upholding it

44 They Take the Scenic Route
Cross-country is more therapy than competition. Running it for time is like eating caviar for protein

70 Poms, Butcher-Birds and Bogeymen
The Aussie penchant for putting reverse English on old institutions has left golf gasping

The departments

13 Scorecard
54 People
56 College Football
60 Hockey
64 Harness Racing
68 Conservation
87 For the Record
88 19th Hole

Credits on page 87

Cover photograph by Neil Leifer

PHOTO22PHOTO26PHOTO30ILLUSTRATION32PHOTO38PHOTO44ILLUSTRATION70

Next week

Big boo, big bubba and the Human Bowling Ball are three of the 40 reasons why the Colts have been so successful. A look at the Super Bowl champions by Tex Maule.

Bluebird tattoos decorate the chest of top jumping jockey Joe Aitcheson, a tough bird on any course but one of an endangered species of fine—and forgotten—athletes.

Determined to be big-league, San Diego snapped up pro franchises, but its residents have other ideas about what is entertainment and enjoy a rich sporting life of their own.