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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

April 09, 1973
April 09, 1973

Table of Contents
April 9, 1973

Lights On
And Blooey!
Van Lennep
Carlton
People
Bowling
Quiz
Fishing
Track & Field
Golf
The Game
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

RUNNING RED
Sirs:
Ken Dryden did an excellent job (The Rinks Were Running Red, March 26) on his diary of the Team Canada-Russia ice hockey games. The article was as humorous and suspenseful as Jim Bouton's Ball Four.

This is an article from the April 9, 1973 issue Original Layout

The only flaw I found was that Dryden forgot to mention that the Russian coach, Vsevolod Bobrov, said that Bobby Clarke of the Philadelphia Flyers was one of the best ice hockey players he had ever seen. Congratulations arc due to Ken Dryden and Mr. Bobrov's good taste.
MICHAEL GENUARDI
Norristown, Pa.

Sirs:
I found Ken Dryden's article provocative as well as interesting, but he is underrating himself. Being a New York Ranger fan, I find it hard to compliment another goalkeeper, but in the Canada-Russia series Dryden showed why he is indeed an NHL All-Star. The way he adapted himself to the Russian style of play was extremely professional.
HAYDEN G. MORRIS
New York City

BADGERED
Sirs:
In covering the Badgers and their victory in the NCAA hockey championship (On, Wisconsin, or Hullabaloo Goes East, March 26), Dan Levin did a good job. However, how he can tag Wisconsin as a Cinderella team is beyond reason. Being the first or second team in the nation throughout the year gives little credence to the thought that Wisconsin first started playing hockey as the clock struck tournament time. Wisconsin didn't have All-Americas like Denver but a few stars don't make a team.
NOLAN ZADRA
Madison, Wis.

Sirs:
As a student at Michigan Tech, which is a member school in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association, I would like to call your attention to the fact that Wisconsin did not get to Boston because it won the Big Ten championship. This has nothing to do with getting to the NCAA finals. Wisconsin beat Minnesota and Notre Dame in the quarter-and semi-finals of the WCHA. That is how the Badgers earned the trip East.
MARY SCHNOTALA
Lake Linden, Mich.

Sirs:
You really should pay more tribute to Coach Bob Johnson. He's the man who engineered an NCAA championship in spite of a painfully weak set of defensemen. He's the man who developed four lines especially for the NCAA tournament, even though it meant some weak performances in January and February. And he's the man who knew that Wisconsin's best chance in the nationals would be to wear down the competition with four lines and constant hustling.
HERB GOULD
Madison, Wis.

FISH STEW
Sirs:
Robert F. Jones' article Highlining with the Soakers of Socorro (March 19) was an interesting, sometimes fascinating story but one that forced me to ask this question: What did the fishermen do with the 12 tons offish they caught?

Did they eat all of their catch—a mind-boggling thought? Did they mount each fish for display? Did they give the fish to the local populace? Or did they simply throw the carcasses over the side? I am tempted to assume the last answer is the correct one, considering man's historical disregard for the preservation of wildlife. I would like very much to be proved wrong, and hope you will do so.
F.J.T. BAKER
Washington, D.C.

•All the fish were iced down, canned in San Diego and given to charities.—ED.

MAN TO MAN
Sirs:
It happens every March, but there are still some college basketball coaches who just will not learn an obvious lesson: you don't win the important championships using a zone defense!

A zone may serve a talented team well during the regular season, but when you get down to the quarter-or semi-finals, you meet other teams with relatively equal talent, and this is when the man-to-man teams rise to the top. UCLA, Memphis State, Virginia Tech and Notre Dame all are basically man-to-man clubs. Oh sure, they'll use a zone press in the backcourt, or occasionally switch to a zone for a special reason, but it's not their main bag.

So the Houstons, Long Beach States, South Carolinas, Providences will continue to rank high in the polls and will continue to get knocked off when things get tough.

You can beat the ordinary teams using a zone, but rarely can you beat the good teams, and never the great ones.
ROD BELCHER
Seattle

LAST YEAR AT GSTAAD
Sirs:
In reference to an item in the PEOPLE section of your March 12 issue, which said that I pushed my way into a line to get on the funicular railway on the ski slopes of Gstaad, I would like to make a few observations:

1. I haven't been to Gstaad in 13 months.

2. When I was last there I did not push myself into a waiting line.

3. Even if I'd wanted to, the snow was so bad there were no lines to push into.
EDWARD M. KENNEDY
U.S. Senator
Washington, D.C.

•The Gstaad Tourist Office says that the incident reported took place there in February 1972.—ED.

GOOD SHOT
Sirs:
Secretariat, all the way! That's the way I see it for the Kentucky Derby on May 5, and he has a very good shot at the Triple Crown, as Pat Putnam points out in his interesting story of this odds-on, winter-book favorite (Oh Lord, He's Perfect, March 26).
WILLIAM F. O'BRIEN
Cincinnati

SQUASHED
Sirs:
It appears to me from your picture of the "accordion" squash court (Fold It Out and Presto!, March 26) that Paul Monaghan has found a surefire way to kill squash in this country. The two men in the picture have obliterated two basketball courts and may be keeping 10 to 15 other people from enjoying their favorite sport. Are the dimensions so different that these two couldn't be competing on a handball court?
BRUCE H. COLLIGNON
Kansas City, Mo.

Sirs:
Your article regarding squash courts was quite interesting; however, a slight error needs correction. You mention that North and South Dakota do not have a squash court between them. While I was stationed at Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota I played many a game of squash in the base gym. North Dakota may not have a lot of things—but a squash court it has.
ALAN COOK
Joplin, Mo.

WATSON, THE BAT
Sirs:
Let it also be known that Holmes' (Adventure of the Aspiring Athlete, March 19) singular first name was chosen by Conan Doyle because, as a boy, he had once scored 30 runs off a cricket bowler named Sherlock. From that time forth he rather liked the name.
WENDY HUNTER
McKinney, Texas

SEA DEVILS
Sirs:
Thank you for the attention you brought to Dr. James Haines and, by extension, to black swimmers (That Old Sinking Feeling, Feb. 12). Dr. Haines has certainly been a leader in attempts to open swimming opportunities to black young people. The lack of competition in his conference and his own swimmers' less-than-spectacular times are indicators of just how few the opportunities have been. But Dr. Haines has been breaking barriers, and someday there will be black Olympians.

When that day comes I am hopeful that they may have gotten their start with our group—the Sea Devils. Working with many of the traditional handicaps—no pool of our own to practice in, children in some cases too poor even to pay minimal meet entry fees—we have produced a team that is holding its own in local and regional AAU competition and equaling the times quoted for Dr. Haines' swimmers. Our team is fully integrated and generally well received at meets. Gradually the old myths about blacks not being able to swim are fading, but it will take an outstanding black swimmer, an Olympian perhaps, to erase them completely and provide the model that other black swimmers have never had available to emulate.
SKIP GRANT
Washington, D.C.

LONG SEASON
Sirs:
After reading about Cal Tatum (FACES IN THE CROWD, March 26) I concluded there must have been some mistake. "Tatum was the season's top scorer with 1,904 points for a 26.3 average," implies that Southern Colorado State played a minimum of 73 basketball games. I know some schools have ambitious schedules, but this is somewhat hard to believe. Either this is a career total or his season's average is slightly higher. Which is it?
GEORGE B. MILLER
New Britain, Conn.

•Tatum's career total is 1,904 points. His average for last season was 26.3.—ED.

BIG VICTORIES
Sirs:
I really enjoyed Herman Weiskopf's article, When the Eagles Crowed (March 19). It is hard to believe that a little school like Clarion State College could end up with more national champions than the big universities in the 1973 NCAA wrestling finals.
CHARLES ADDLEMAN
Carnegie, Pa.

Sirs:
Hail to Herman Weiskopf for giving recognition to one of the best college wrestlers in the U.S., Clarion State's Wade Schalles. When he was a wrestler in high school here in Hollidaysburg, Wade's irrepressible holds earned him scholarship offers from many better-known colleges, but he chose Clarion State and is now working his wonders for the Eagles. If Wade keeps up at the pace he is going, he will be a shoo-in for the 1976 Olympics in Montreal.
JOHN HARTSOCK
Hollidaysburg, Pa.

Sirs:
Surely the Iowa State wrestling team deserves more than one-half inch of one column for winning its fourth NCAA title in five years. After all, Chris Taylor, the 1973 heavyweight champion, is no small thing.
TOM FIERKE
BRAD SWEET
KIRK PATRICK
Minneapolis

Sirs:
May Chris Taylor fall on you for your inadequate coverage of the NCAA wrestling championships.
LARRY G. STEELE
Sports Editor
The Express
Lock Haven, Pa.

CHRIS' DEBUT
Sirs:
Congratulations on the fine article by Joe Jares on Chris Evert and women's tennis (Now She Plays for Green Stamps, March 12). But to prevent some readers from getting the impression that future pro tournaments will be a two-fisted breeze for the new prima donna, let's hear no more references to Billie Jean King and Margaret Court as "aging actresses." Neither of these topnotch players is ready to trade her racket for a cane just yet. And "veteran" Virginia Wade's slams and volleys proved capable of being quite potent against Chris the next week in Dallas. Don't be so quick to dismiss the experience of the ladies who have labored the longest while bowing in awe to the new children's crusade.
MICHELLE COULTER
Baltimore

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