19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 29, 1974

BARED FACTS
Sir:
Each winter I eagerly await the arrival of your swimsuit preview issue, not so much for the article itself but for the entertaining letters that inevitably follow from outraged defenders of our national morals. Unfortunately the fine line of good taste you have drawn in the past has been blurred or, rather, obliterated by the totally unnecessary inclusion of that photograph of a "nubile nude" in the article on Evel Knievel ("We Shoulda Run One More Test," Sept. 16). Good reporting presumes a measure of discretion that was sadly lacking on your part this time.
MICHAEL T. CHRISTY
Burlington, Vt.

Sir:
Disgusting! I really don't see that your picture of the naked girl added anything to the article. Was it supposed to? Why not try ignoring people such as these for a while and maybe—just maybe—they'll grow up.
LINDA GOODSON
Fort Smith, Ark.

Sir:
I was very disappointed that SI printed a picture of the "nubile nude" being "launched" by spectators at Evel Knievel's show. The description of it was enough. No more, please.
ROBERT G. CUNDIFF
Jackson, Ky.

Sir:
If we wanted a picture of some stupid woman being handled by some equally stupid men, we would have subscribed to an altogether different type of magazine.
MRS. B. GLATTING
Milwaukee

Sir:
Before you are inundated by letters from nonthinking, though well-meaning, parents excoriating you for the nudity displayed with the Evel Knievel article, let me—as a parent—say thanks for the picture of that naked young chick. She epitomized the whole farcical atmosphere surrounding the whole ridiculous circus.
LANNY R. MIDDINGS
San Ramon, Calif.

Sir:
Although I do not always agree with your viewpoints, I have enjoyed reading your magazine for the past few years. In my opinion, however, your publication lost some stature by allotting so much space to the coverage of the insane activities surrounding Evel Knievel. Such mania belongs on the pages of psychological journals and sensationalistic weeklies. Please don't confuse sport with psychopathy.
GREG KUZMA
New York City

PICKS AND PICKERS
Sir:
Well, Tex Maule has done it again (LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER, Sept. 16). He just won't break down and choose Miami as the Super Bowl winner. Maybe this is a good sign, though, because the last couple of years Maule hasn't picked the Dolphins to win the Super Bowl and they are two-time world champions—going on three.
KATHY VILLHARD
WANDA HARDY
Daytona Beach

Sir:
When will Tex Maule come to admit that the American Conference now has complete superiority in the NFL, with better players, better coaches and better front-office personnel than the "more established" National Conference teams? May George Foreman use him as a sparring partner on his new boxing assignment.
TOM BORK
Brookfield, Ill.

Sir:
I'll miss ol' Tex Maule on the pro football beat. Without him and Nixon to kick around anymore, life might be dull. At least Tex left Miami a parting gift; he picked the Dolphins to lose.
BRIAN EINSTEIN
North Miami

Sir:
Dan Jenkins picked the Baltimore Colts as one of the dullest teams of the season. All I can say about that is don't let Joe Thomas find out.

Jenkins makes predictions that say much about his personality. If he keeps writing like this, I predict that Dan will end up as the Best Water Boy.
JOHN NUEDLING JR.
Baltimore

Sir:
The pro football articles were tremendous. You underestimated the Bills but, nevertheless, good work.

One question. After his story on the coaches (Ever See So Many Geniuses?, Sept. 16), for the sake of equal time will there be 26 viewpoints on Dan Jenkins?
AL REID
Wickliffe, Ohio

Sir:
I think your Sept. 16 issue featuring pro football was the best issue of SI I have ever received.
PETE THOMPSON
Alexandria, Va.

PAY FOR PLAY
Sir:
In SCORECARD of your Sept. 16 issue you report that Charlie Schuhmann of UCLA says, "Within five years there will be some form of protest among college football players unless we get more money to live on." He goes on to say, "It's not so bad during the regular football season when we have a training table. But there is no training table during spring drills..." etc.

This attitude baffles me. Back in the "olden days" (I played under Bob Zuppke at Illinois in 1932-34) there was no training table, no grant-in-aid, no athletic scholarship. Most of us got a "meal job" at a fraternity, sorority or dormitory, plus whatever else was available, to earn a buck. I drove a cab, among other things.

We played football because we loved football, and we played both ways, too—defense and offense. Today these young men and their coaches seem to want it all on a silver platter. Lord knows, this country does not need or want another Depression, but if it happens, goodby pay for play and goofing off by the likes of Charlie Schuhmann.
BARTON A. CUMMINGS
New York City

SMALL BEEFS
Sir:
I enjoyed your excellent coverage of College Football 1974 (Sept. 9) except there was no mention of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas among the NCAA Division II schools named. I would think Mike Thomas, last year's leading ground gainer in all football (1,741 yards in 11 games) would get a mention. Former Dallas Cowboy scout Ron Meyer, coach of the Rebels, has assembled a team that will merit SI's coverage at some time or other.
BOB BLUM
Vice-President/General Manager
Radio Station KLAV
Las Vegas

Sir:
Your magazine is a very highly respected publication. However, a great deal of that respect is lost when you fail to mention the name of the AP and UPI small-college champion. In case you don't remember, Tennessee State University fielded a football team last year and it went undefeated and produced the No. 1 pro football draft pick, Ed Jones of Dallas.
DAVID HILL
Ridgeland, S.C.

Sir:
I find it amazing that you repeatedly mention Louisiana Tech as having beaten some of your small-college favorites for this season but fail to give Tech a chance this year.
GENE HASTINGS
Ruston, La.

QUEEN OF SOFTBALL
Sir:
Thank you for your article on the Women's World Softball Tournament (The Early Birds Squirmed, Aug. 26). I first saw the Raybestos Brakettes of Stratford, Conn. in the summer of 1973 when they came up to Agincourt, Ontario. I was so impressed with the Brakettes and the queen of softball, Joan Joyce, that I made plans to attend the 1974 women's fast pitch tournament that was to be held in Orlando, Fla. Just two weeks after they had taken the world title from the Japanese, Joan and her teammates had to do it all again. They were upset in their third game 2-1 by Indianapolis, which knocked Stratford into the loser's bracket. In order to come back for the championship, the Brakettes had to win seven straight games—and they did it. During the last two nights of the tournament Joan pitched 45 innings while shutting out her opponents to capture a record fourth straight national championship. Not only is she a proficient softball pitcher, she is excellent in basketball, golf and bowling. Therefore, I am sending in my nomination now for Joan Joyce as Sportswoman of the Year.
KEN SISLER
Newmarket, Ontario

TURTLE TUNNEL?
Sir:
Your SCORECARD item about the turtle trap (Aug. 26) interested me very much. On a recent visit to England I rode on a freeway south of London that had been built right through a badger crossing. Many of the animals were killed in the heavy traffic.

To solve the problem, the English dug a tunnel under the raised roadway and installed a culvert. Now the badgers travel on their age-old path in safety.

Perhaps Mrs. Armacost could lobby for turtle culverts and thus stay the slaughter in New Jersey.
JOHN M. COCHRANE
Sacramento

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

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