19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

October 12, 1975

RED-HOT TOWN
Sir:
Whenever I read or hear something glowing about Cincinnati, especially from an outsider, I get a good feeling inside. At this moment I feel great.

Frank Deford's article (Watch on the Ohio, Sept. 29) highlights just a few of the gems in the Queen City's crown. I love my city. Being a staid and conservative Cincinnatian, I am sometimes embarrassed to admit it. Cincinnati is as beautiful as the photograph that begins the article.

Having spent the last four years as a police officer on Cincy's downtown streets, I believe I can also speak with some authority on this river town's virtues. If Deford would spend one lunch hour on Fountain Square on a summer afternoon, he might change his mind about our women's looks.
STEVEN E. EGGERS
Cincinnati

Sir:
Frank Deford may qualify as a judge of Miss America beauty contestants (LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER, Sept. 29), but he's no judge of our Cincinnati women. We have more than our fair share of beauties.
WILLIAM F. O'BRIEN
Cincinnati

Sir:
I marveled at the way Frank Deford recognized the Queen City's endearing quirks, which would have confounded a less sensitive writer. And Longfellow surely would have approved of Photographer Heinz Kluetmeier's glittering image of (to borrow from Catawba Wine) "...the Queen of the West/in her garlands dressed/on the banks of the Beautiful River.
ROGER J. MEZGER
Stow, Ohio

Sir:
I had always thought it impossible for an outsider to understand what Cincinnati is all about, yet in a few short pages Frank Deford has captured it all.
BRIAN M. VOLCK
Cincinnati

COACH HAYDON
Sir:
Thanks for the article This Coach Is First Class (Sept. 22). Being associated with Ted Haydon and the University of Chicago Track Club is one of my best memories as a distance runner. After 3½ years of Big Ten athletics, where emphasis was on amassing meaningless titles and trophies, I was a disillusioned athlete. What a relief it was to be able to compete in an atmosphere where personal growth was valued above what place you finished. I have seen Ted Haydon refuse to be interrupted in order to watch one of his men struggle through a six-minute mile. Interestingly enough, my best races were run in this atmosphere, and that is the beauty of his approach. An athlete can realize his potential, not through external pressure but through self-motivation. Years later the athlete has a lot more than trophies to show for his efforts. He has the ability to draw on the best within himself.
DICK HALL
Columbia, Calif.

Sir:
Sarah Pileggi's article paid tribute to a rare individual. Everyone decries the state of amateur athletics in the U.S., but Ted Haydon is one person who, for the past 25 years, has worked to provide training and competitive opportunities for amateurs—especially the post-college athletes who are so frequently ignored by the American system. His unselfish dedication to track and field should provide inspiration to all who want to change the present situation. We need many more Ted Haydons.
LARRY G. FRANKS
Smyrna, N.Y.

Sir:
Because of Ted Haydon my pole vaulting career was prolonged six years and I was able to attain my goal. I was no Bob Seagren, but I was competitive.
MIKE HANNA
Pendleton, Ind.

Sir:
How refreshing to find a genuine, low-gear personality in the midst of 20th century high-powered sports.
LEE DAVID FAUTSCH
Dubuque, Iowa

COVERING NOTRE DAME
Sir:
Having always been a fan of Notre Dame football and tradition, I was pleased with your Sept. 29 cover picturing Quarterback Rick Slager. Another issue of special interest to me was Sept. 30, 1974 with Tom Clements on the cover. Which brings up a question: How many Notre Dame quarterbacks have made the cover of SI?
JIM MULLEN
The Dalles, Ore.

•Seven, beginning with Paul Hornung (Oct. 29, 1956).—ED.

Sir:
Which college football team has been on the cover most often?
DAVID J. YOUNG
Notre Dame, Ind.

•Notre Dame, with 14 appearances, including one "defeat" at the hands of Actress Shirley MacLaine. Texas is runner-up with 11, Oklahoma has made it nine times and USC eight.—ED.

Sir:
Rick Slager has achieved an unusual distinction. In 1971 (Aug. 16) he appeared in your FACES IN THE CROWD section, and now he has been featured on the cover.
VINCE MECONI
Wilmington, Del.

Sir:
As a Purdue grad I must comment on John Underwood's article. I take issue with only one statement: "Purdue's pride is that it has beaten the Irish more than any other team has." That is only one measure of Purdue's pride. Not only do we have the nation's finest marching band, we have the world's largest drum (Texas, don't bother to argue) and the famous Golden Girl. Purdue also produces such stars as Bob Griese, Mike Phipps and Otis Armstrong.

Talk about our pride, yes, but please don't limit it to one game a year with one school which, I think, is overrated anyway.
SANDRA OLP
Dayton

NO ICE—ANP NO "E"
Sir:
Clive Gammon (Good Show on the House of Lords, Sept. 29) is a very fortunate man because if ghillies could read, he would be tracked to the end of the earth and shot dead. Salmon, the most magnificent fighting fish in the world, is never, never toasted with "whiskey," and to state that a ghillie does so is unpardonable. "Whisky," and only "whisky," can claim the right to be associated with the King of the Sea. Shame on you. May you catch only menhaden.
ORISON MACPHERSON
New Rochelle, N.Y.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)