19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

November 17, 1975

SEEING REDS
Sir:
For the most exciting World Series and the greatest single Series game coverage of all time (Everything Came Up Reds, Nov. 3), SI's writers and photographers were undeniably up to the occasion and are worthy of their own share of superlatives. The pictures gave me goose bumps all over again.
RICHARD MATHEWS
Altadena, Calif.

Sir:
Ron Fimrite is the best sportswriter around, and the story by George Plimpton was superb.
JOSEPH BALDWIN
Garland, Maine

Sir:
I have to congratulate Ron Fimrite on his excellent article on the most memorable World Series in the history of baseball.
BILL SNOW
Brunswick, Maine

Sir:
The Reds deserve more credit than I thought anyone gave them. They came from behind or tie situations in five of the seven games. True, only four of the five resulted in Cincinnati victories, but surely this shows a ball club with depth; one that wouldn't roll over and die after the heartbreaking loss of Game 6 or from the quick three-run lead attained by the Red Sox in Game 7.
BRIAN FRIEDMAN
Athens, Ohio

Sir:
Ron Fimrite referred to Grover Cleveland Alexander as "old and used up" when he struck out Tony Lazzeri with the bases loaded in the seventh game of the 1926 Series. That he was old there is no doubt (39) but hardly used up: he had won 12 games that year, had already pitched two complete-game victories in the Series and was to go on to two pretty good years. He was 21-10 in 1927 and 16-9 in 1928.

Incidentally, in 1928 the Yankees got some revenge on him in the Series: he lasted only 2‚Öì innings in the second game.
DAVID P. HAWKINS
New York City

Sir:
The sight of the Reds' victory celebration at Fenway is something I will never forget. It was a moment of indescribable joy for me, and your great coverage will always help me to relive that moment.
JOHN REDDINGTON
Middletown, Ind.

MANMADE MARSHES
Sir:
Robert H. Boyle's article (The Man Who Makes Marshes, Oct. 20) implies that Dr. E. W. Garbisch Jr. has conceived, developed and promoted marsh-building practices that are unique and suggests this is an area of environmental concern that had been previously overlooked or neglected by responsible public agencies. Our work here at North Carolina State University on the establishment of new salt marsh predates Garbisch's activities by about three years.

We do not believe we are overly sensitive in this matter of credit. We think you can see also that the publication of such claims as those in the article is unfair to those who have planned, conducted and reported on these investigations, and the organizations that provided financial support, namely, the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, the Coastal Engineering Research Center, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Office of Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the North Carolina Sea Grant Program, and the North Carolina Center for Marine and Coastal Studies.

We trust that this factual information will be useful in setting the record straight on this issue.
W. W. WOODHOUSE JR.
Professor of Soil Science
E. D. SENECA
Associate Professor of Botany
S. W. BROOME
Research Associate of Soil Science
Raleigh, N.C.

Sir:
Certainly Edgar W. Garbisch Jr. and his work in nature are sufficiently important to be reported on their own merits. I am surprised, however—and a little disappointed—that author Boyle failed to mention Edgar's football-playing father, Ed Garbisch, an All-America center who graduated from West Point just 50 years ago. In 1954 he was elected to the National Football Foundation Hall of Fame and in 1959 to the Helms Athletic Foundation Hall of Fame.
GORDON CUBBISON
Carmel, Calif.

Sir:
Robert H. Boyle's salt marsh story is getting much comment here in Washington. You have published the perfect controversy story, one that is being played big by both sides. The Conservation Foundation, National Wildlife Federation and Sport Fishing Institute are circulating the piece to their constituents; the Fertilizer Institute (Mr. Ferd) called me to bring my attention to it. Marshes are great for getting rid of all that horrible super-enrichment!
GEORGE REIGER
Senior Editor
National Wildlife Federation Washington

NO SURPRISE
Sir:
Re Kenny Moore's story (A Kind of Mexican Standoff, Nov. 3) on the Pan-Am Games, he states that "Cuba lost...to surprising Puerto Rico." Probably only Mr. Moore was surprised. All knowledgeable international basketball fans are quite aware that Puerto Rico's showing throughout the past 16 years has been superb. It has beaten Cuba and almost everyone else consistently.
JORGE BERM√öDEZ TORREGROSA
Carolina, P.R.

JOY OF SOCCER
Sir:
Sarah Pileggi's story (The Joys of Discovering a Grand Old Game, Nov. 3) was a true pleasure. With a motto like AYSO's (Everybody Plays) and your interest, it won't be long until soccer becomes this country's No. 1 game.
ROBERT MANASSE
Lexington, Ky.

NO PAIN
Sir:
Re "Down the Drain" (SCORECARD, Nov. 3), the selfishness of the owners, legal problems and Memphis-Birmingham aspirations aside, wouldn't it be grand for the 1976 season if one of the two new NFL expansion teams was permitted to have its first 28 picks from the players of the old WFL and the other to have its first 28 picks from the 1976 college crop?

Such a plan would have immediate box-office potential (no matter where they played)—the WFL and the new college kids against the established NFL teams, rather than the usual years of pain and suffering expected of expansion clubs and the fans who watch them.
BILL L. WILLIAMSON
Sherwood, Ore.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
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Eagle (-2)
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Bogey (+1)
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