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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Dec. 01, 1975
Dec. 01, 1975

Table of Contents
Dec. 1, 1975

Buckeyes
Los Angeles Rams
College Football
Boxing
Pro Basketball
WFL
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Edited by Gay Flood

MAYHEM
Sir:
It is difficult to shock the present-day sports fan but after reading Ray Kennedy's poignant essay on the mayhem in hockey ( Wanted: An End to Mayhem, Nov. 17), I was genuinely saddened. I had the same feeling when I started John Underwood's article on kids' football (Taking the Fun Out of a Game). However, the latter ended up on one of the warmest high notes that I can recall as Bob Cupp's peewee ran his first sweep. I was still smiling as I closed the magazine—until I was confronted once more by the hockey brawl pictured on your cover. Do you think you could introduce Clarence Campbell to Cupp? Perhaps the NHL owners ought to meet him, too.
G. GORDON CONNALLY
Buffalo

This is an article from the Dec. 1, 1975 issue Original Layout

Sir:
The current trend toward out-and-out assault in professional hockey is not only abhorrent but intolerable. Under the law, such actions are criminal offenses and not subject to NHL "interpretations." Bobby Orr has my respect and admiration for being man enough to stand up against the trend. When well played, hockey can be exciting, physical and interesting. In its present form it is an insult to any true sports fan.
RICHARD S. BROCKWAY
Huntington, N.Y.

Sir:
The violence in hockey should not shock anyone. Man (and woman) was born with violence in his (or her) blood. I think the NHL should establish strict rules for needless fights but not for the ones that erupt from the heat of the battle.
JOSEPH BARRESI
New York City

Sir:
Your article may be comparable to one found in Rome Illustrated in 476 A.D.
GARY E. WILSON
Bowling Green, Ohio

FOR FUN
Sir:
I compliment John Underwood on his fine article and Bob Cupp on his fun approach to the game of football. Having attended my 10-year-old son's baptism into the world of organized football this season, I was appalled at the clinical, win-at-any-cost approach to the sport. The scene could very well have taken place at Municipal Stadium, except the participants were 70 pounds soaking wet. I am sure some good is derived from all of this, but I will not soon forget the sight of one "coach" loudly berating a small boy on the sideline, reducing him to tears. Where was the fun that day?
HAL G. TIPPETT
Cleveland

Sir:
Why must everything successful become suspect? In your article we coaches were treated as if we all had Napoleonic complexes. Isn't it possible that the vast majority of us are merely well-meaning adults who enjoy the game and working with children?

Human beings are by nature competitive, and children are their own severest critics.
HUGH J. HERRON
Linwood, N.J.

Sir:
As a Little League umpire, I was continually aghast at the immaturity of managers; I was sure that the fault lay with forcing the "winning" ethos of adults upon kids. I've since changed my mind. The villain is our spectator society. Deprived of the physical release of exerting his direct influence on the game, the spectator goes bananas. The manager, aware of the ravages of old age, mourns his own youthful missed chances and cleanses himself by taking it out on "his" kids. The truth is that small children are not terribly concerned with winning. The sense of teamwork and physical exhilaration are goals enough. What we really need are leagues for aging parents.
MARTIN GILL
Evanston, Ill.

SPORTSMEN
Sir:
Based on his statistics—.331 batting average, 21 home runs, 105 RBIs—plus his contribution to his team's success and being named Rookie of the Year, my vote for Sportsman of the Year goes to Fred Lynn of the Boston Red Sox.
TOM SCHERMERHORN
Oneonta, N.Y.

Sir:
O. J. Simpson. He's the best open-field runner since Gale Sayers.
JAMES C. MILLER III
Bloomington, Ind.

Sir:
Has anyone won the award twice in a row? I ask because I hope you guys are smart enough to pick Muhammad Ali again.
GARY BAILEY
Moline, Ill.

Sir:
Archie Griffin.
STEPHEN G. KENNEY
Somers, N.Y.

ROOKIES
Sir:
In regard to the article The Most Likely to Succeed in your March 31 issue, whatever happened to all those major league rookies who couldn't miss: Keith Hernandez (St. Louis), Marc Hill (San Francisco), Tom Veryzer (Detroit), Gary Carter (Montreal), Jim Kern (Cleveland) and Phil Garner (Oakland)?
Lou MALIK
Wichita, Kans.

•Here are their major league statistics: Hernandez, first base, 64 games, .250 BA, three HRs, 20 RBIs; Hill, catcher, 72 games, .214 BA, five HRs, 23 RBIs; Veryzer, shortstop, 128 games, .252 BA, five HRs, 48 RBIs; Carter, catcher and outfielder, 144 games, .270 BA, 17 HRs, 68 RBIs; Kern, pitcher, 13 games (72 innings), 3.77 ERA, won one, lost two; Garner, second base, 160 games, .246 BA, six HRs, 54 RBIs.—ED.

READING FOR THE BLIND
Sir:
We were delighted to see your LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER (NOV. 3) describing the Talking Book editions of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and other magazines available to persons with visual or physical impairments which prevent them from reading.

Perhaps your readers would like to know that there also is available an audio anthology that for 14 years has presented memorable and varied pieces selected from a total of more than 60 distinguished periodicals, including SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. It is called Choice Magazine Listening and it, too, is recorded by the expressive voices at the American Printing House for the Blind. Every other month our eligible subscribers receive free of charge eight hours' worth of one of the world's most joyous activities—reading.
MARION C. LOEB
Executive Director
Choice Magazine Listening
Port Washington, N.Y.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.