Search

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Dec. 08, 1975
Dec. 08, 1975

Table of Contents
Dec. 8, 1975

It Wasn't Close
New Colts
College Basketball
College Football
Cross-Country
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Departments

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Edited by Gay Flood

ON THE RUN
Sir:
Your article A Dash into History—for Now (Nov. 24) certainly rang true. Our college teams are so packed with running backs there is hardly room for anybody else. But there is one back you left out. He is Robin Earl, a 6'5", 250-pound fullback for the Washington Huskies. Robin, a converted tight end, averaged only 69.8 yards a game but he got them mostly on power because he played behind a young line. He is only a junior and has led the Huskies to victories over both UCLA and USC. Earl and Washington will be in the limelight next year.
PAUL PLEWNARZ
Buckley, Wash.

This is an article from the Dec. 8, 1975 issue Original Layout

Sir:
I read with interest Larry Keith's article on running backs but I feel that he left out an important one, Michigan's Gordon Bell. While only 5'9", 178 pounds, he is very quick and is able to cut exceptionally well. He also has a 121.4-yard-per-game average, with a high of 210.
FRED REZLER
Bay City, Mich.

Sir:
How could Larry Keith fail to include West Virginia University's Artie (King Arthur) Owens in his otherwise fine article on college running backs? Owens is WVU's all-time leading career rusher and he gained 959 yards this season (he missed most of two games because of a shoulder injury). His average of 6.9 yards per carry is outstanding. A tailback, Owens has helped to lead the Mountaineers to the Peach Bowl and will surely be drafted high by an NFL team.
JIM POTTER
Charleston, W. Va.

Sir:
It's ironic that when talking about Pitt's Tony Dorsett, one of the country's top running backs, you include a picture of him in action against Oklahoma. Dorsett, who before the Penn State game was averaging 141.9 yards a game and 7.1 per carry, could muster only 17 on 12 carries against the Sooner defense. I suspect Tony would rather have seen himself in action against Notre Dame.
BILL SHANKS JR.
Owasso, Okla.

Sir:
You forgot to mention that the alltime rushing record against a Notre Dame team that Tony Dorsett broke with 303 yards was also held by Dorsett (209 yards in a 1973 loss to the Irish).
GARY KOTESKI
Pennsylvania Furnace, Pa.

HUDSON'S TIGERS
Sir:
Re Wave the Flag for Hudson High (Nov. 24), my hat is off to Douglas Looney for skillfully portraying the football mania of small-town America, to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for reminding its readers that not all of the glamour and excitement of sport is found in the professional and college arenas and to Hudson, Mich. for a truly remarkable accomplishment.
RICHARD L. BALDWIN
Lubbock, Texas

Sir:
Hudson High's Jack Armstrong image proved no match for the SI jinx. The nation's longest high school winning streak was shattered at 72 when Ishpeming defeated the Tigers 38-22 in the Michigan Class C state championship final.
BOB SCHMIDT
Westminster, Calif.

Sir:
As a former resident of Hudson, Mich., I share the pride that Coach Tom Saylor and his Tigers have given the town. The values he has taught his teams are priceless. Who cares if none of these boys make it in college football? High school athletics should be for everyone to enjoy, regardless of the win-loss record. Coach Saylor just happens to combine maximum participation with winning. More power to him.
CLAUDIA CHAMPION
Kalamazoo, Mich.

Sir:
Hang in there, Hudson High. If Bear Bryant loses one more bowl game, you may be his next choice as an opponent.
TERRY WOLTER
Denver

Sir:
Had he spent a little more time on it, Douglas Looney might have extended his two-foot queue of town notables to include Poet Will Carleton {Over the Hill to the Poor House, Gone with a Handsomer Man, etc.), whose plaque-marked home is a scant mile east out Main Street.

And in sports he might have considered Hudsonborn Clarke (Pinky) Pittenger, Red Sox, Cubs and Reds infielder, 1921-1929, and Eugene (Bom) Swaney, Brown University's All-Eastern halfback of the early 1920s.
LEWIS A. SPALDING
Hadlyme, Conn.

FROM THE MAYORS' OFFICE
Sir:
As the mayor of the city of Atlanta, I take exception to the completely unfair remarks made by Frank Deford in his article Watch on the Ohio in your Sept. 29 issue.

Not only is the statement concerning Cincinnati's becoming' 'another Atlanta" unfair and unrelated to the subject being discussed, but the allegations that follow certainly do not apply to our situation.

We are justifiably proud of the level of cooperation that exists here in Atlanta across all lines—economic, racial, social and political—and I am certain that Mr. Deford would find out why Atlanta is one of America's most successful cities if he took the time to visit.
MAYNARD JACKSON
Atlanta

Sir:
My congratulations on an excellent article about Don Vesco, one of our city's outstanding citizens (Flat Out on the Flats, Nov. 10). It is a very fine acknowledgment of Don's efforts in setting a world land-speed record for motorcycles.

As the mayor of the city of El Cajon, let me correct one small portion of your story. San Diego sits right on the ocean, and you indicated that the city of El Cajon was west of San Diego. This puts us at approximately 60 fathoms deep (glub, glub). We are about 15 miles east of downtown San Diego.
JAMES C. SNAPP
El Cajon, Calif.

MAYHEM (CONT.)
Sir:
My congratulations for having the courage and insight to expose the unconscionable prostitution of sport (Wanted: No More Mayhem and Taking the Fun Out of a Came, Nov. 17). Sport can be glorious, exhilarating and instructional to watch or participate in, but not when it becomes legalized violence or a means to work out a parent's frustrations. With all the excellent reasons for sport to exist we must not continue to tolerate its existence for these most appalling of reasons.
ERIC SCHULTZ
Cincinnati

Sir:
I must applaud Ray Kennedy's story on violence in hockey. Even Clarence Campbell said that fighting "disrupts the flow of play and is no attraction for the fan who understands the game." Hockey is a wonderful sport, but if it cannot clean its own house, the courts will have to intervene. A professional sports arena is no sanctuary for conduct in violation of criminal law.
STEVEN TREMAIN
Los Angeles

Sir:
I was having a backyard discussion during the Dave Forbes trial when a neighbor's 10-year-old, who had played some small-fry hockey, airily refuted all my arguments by announcing that fighting is "a part of the sport." Too bad. I used to think that hockey was mostly teamwork, crisp passing and sharp shooting. It is sad that the kids are already brainwashed. Thanks to Ray Kennedy for restoring a little sanity.
CHRISTOPHER J. DUNFORD
Columbia, Md.

Sir:
Hockey wouldn't be the same without violence. If the NHL ever seriously considered adopting any of the outrageous proposals made in the article. I would never watch another game.
THOMAS RUST
Northfield, N.J.

Sir:
Ray Kennedy's article made some valid points on the overabundance of violence that exists in hockey today. But why did you confuse the readers with your cover photo and the three accompanying pictures, every one of which shows at least one New York Ranger? Any knowledgeable fan knows that the Rangers simply do not stand for hockey violence. To see a Ranger hit hard, let alone fight, is a wonder.
BOB HEUSSLER
Bridgeport, Conn.

Sir:
I don't feel that it is fair to talk about hockey's modern-day bad guys without looking at the bad men of yesteryear: Sprague Cleghorn, Newsy Lalonde and others. But why list them when King Clancy said it all about early hockey when he remarked about the Toronto Maple Leafs (1969 or 1970): "The game's just not the same. We don't have a soul who'll walk out there tonight when the whistle blows and hammer somebody into the seats."
DOUG KINNEY
Brick Town, N.J.

Sir:
It seems funny to me that some people can remember the Philadelphia Flyers' total penalty minutes for last season and forget that the Flyers dominated the Stanley Cup playoffs with finesse rather than fisticuffs. As far as I'm concerned, the only thing Ray Kennedy proved was that you don't have to play ice hockey to give someone a black eye.
RICHARD STEWART
Morgantown, W. Va.

Sir:
Finally, someone put into words my sentiments concerning excessive violence in professional hockey. As Ray Kennedy so ably expresses it, what we fans want is not to see an end to good, solid, hard-hitting hockey, but rather, an end to the slipshod, lackluster kind of playing that relies on premeditated violence to generate excitement.
LINDA C. SUTTER
New York City

FOR FUN (CONT.)
Sir:
In my seven years of subscribing to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED I have never come across as timely and necessary an article as John Underwood's (Taking the Fun Out of a Game, Nov. 17). As a kids' soccer coach, I was able to identify completely with the point Underwood was making. Coaches involved with kids must begin to evaluate their position more realistically. It is not to yell and carry on and appease parents, but to have a less intense approach and make sure the youngsters enjoy what they are doing. I hope Underwood's piece will convey this to overzealous parents everywhere. Let's teach these kids the joys of sport, not have them develop ulcers as preteen-agers.

Also, I nominate Bob Cupp as SI's Sportsman of the Year.
JOHN L. KIRBY
Cumberland, R. I.

Sir:
You have given us an interesting and thought-provoking glimpse of trends and contrasts in our society in your recent articles on kids' soccer (Nov. 3) and young men's football.
GRAY B. ZISCHKE
Kaaawa, Hawaii

Sir:
Vince Lombardi, one of the great coaches of our time, was surely thinking of professional athletes when he made that famous statement, "Winning isn't everything; it's the only thing." He must have been thinking of kids' football when he said, "Has this become a game for madmen, and have I become one of them?."
JERRY F. ALLOCCO
New Providence, N. J.

Sir:
It's been said that a coach is sometimes the most influential teacher a child has. If so, I wouldn't want a man who punches out a 12-year-old star of the opposing team coaching my kid.
BOB MOSELEY
Ridgefield, Conn.

Sir:
I am happy to say that the coaches of the team on which I play are more like Bob Cupp than any of the others mentioned.
CHET KOLLEY
Middletown, Pa.

Sir:
I have witnessed isolated instances of most of the situations pointed out by John Underwood. When they occur, they are appalling. But I have the gut feeling that such instances are isolated. Unfortunately, my sons are not going to be coached by perfect human beings. Nor will they witness perfect parent conduct at their games, or at home, for that matter. But they are not going to encounter that human perfection anywhere. So, even with all of the imperfection that my boys will experience in their Pop Warner days, at least they will have learned teamwork, how to lose and how to win; they will have learned the importance of second effort and of curbing their tempers and channeling aggression; and they will have learned how to be better men.
LIEUT. COMMANDER K. B. ABEL
Chaplain Corps, USN
San Diego

Sir:
It is true a parent can ruin his son by making him feel guilty for not playing football when he might be more inclined toward the piccolo. But the parent who was a concert pianist or an Eagle Scout can ruin his child by pressing him to excel in music or scouting when his interests are elsewhere. Pressure is not unique to football or athletics, as many children who are expected to bring home a good report card from school can verify. When it comes to kids' football, the trick is indeed to keep them smiling, and people like Bob Cupp are proving it can be done.
BUD RATHMEL
Wichita, Kans.

Sir:
Your article about junior football, especially Bob Cupp's comments and philosophy, should be required reading for all prospective coaches, and especially parents.
JERRY G. HARTMAN
Bloomington, Ind.

MYSTIC SEAPORT'S BOOK
Sir:
The excellent and sensitive review (ART TALK, Nov. 10) of Rudolph J. Schaefer's book J. E. Buttersworth, 19th-century Marine Painter contained one unfortunate but perhaps understandable error. The publisher of this book is clearly identified as Mystic Seaport, not Wesleyan University Press. Since Wesleyan University Press distributes our books, it is probable that this was the cause of the error. However, we at Mystic Seaport are justifiably proud of our book-publishing program, so I hope you will understand my desire to bring this to the attention of your readers.
PERCY KNAUTH
Coordinator of Publications
Mystic Seaport, Inc.
Mystic, Conn.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.