19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

February 02, 1976

TWIN BILL
Sir:
Normally it takes a great deal to get me to pass up articles by Dan Jenkins and John Underwood, but once again Jule Campbell's swimsuit feature and the photographs by Kourken Pakchanian (Taking a Shine to a Resort with New Glitter, Jan. 19) have provided the impetus. Now, with the pages of the Baja section amply frayed, I can go back to the Jenkins and Underwood reports.
BILL BRYANT
Athens, Ga.

Sir:
The Sylvander twins are the greatest sibling act since the Selmons.
BARRY D. GANGWER
Oklahoma City

Sir:
A Pulitzer Prize for Photographer Kourken Pakchanian. Your cover can't jinx those two.
MARK CASHIN
Cohoes, N.Y.

Sir:
Do you people have any conception at all of what pictures like those of Yvette and Yvonne Sylvander do to male college students stuck studying in January in Lewiston, Maine? I mean, do you?
MARK O'CONNELL
Lewiston, Maine

Sir:
Which way to the beach?
SETH HAMMER
Syracuse, N.Y.

Sir:
I object. It's ridiculous to think the editors of SI would give two bathing beauties the cover spot when such a spectacular event as the Soviet-Flyer game had taken place. When it comes to sports action give me Schultz and Clarke over Yvette and Yvonne every time.
CRIST O. WILKINS
Grand Blanc, Mich.

Sir:
Take these pictures to your teen-age boy. I don't want them at my house. Why do you want to put pictures of girls without clothes on in a sports magazine? No wonder the country is in the mess it is in.
Mrs. ROY TROUSDALE
Rogersville, Ala.

Sir:
You break faith with each one of your readers when you put out issues like this.
C. W. ALLEN
Madison, N.J.

Sir:
Kindly cancel our subscription.
SISTER MARY FRANCES
Trumbull Catholic Regional School
Trumbull, Conn.

Sir:
I do not wish to cancel my subscription.
R. J. HAIDINGER
Rutherford, N.J.

Sir:
As an elementary school principal, I would like to say I do not believe Cheryl Tiegs represents a threat to the morals of American youth. I am a transplanted Buckeye in this land of the maize and blue, and somehow she even makes Ohio State's Rose Bowl defeat seem inconsequential.
MICHAEL WALLS
Romeo, Mich.

Sir:
The majority of SI readers are no doubt male, and since there were no pictures of men in bathing suits, I assume your (un)coverage will continue to cater to this majority and wise women will drop their subscriptions.
PEGGY JOHNSTON
Brookline, Mass.

Sir:
Call me a male chauvinist, but I feel Yvette, Yvonne, Christie Brinkley and Cheryl Tiegs are the most beautiful young ladies ever to appear in any major magazine.
TOM ELVERSON
Nantucket, Mass.

Sir:
Regarding the LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER (Jan. 19), this was Cheryl Tiegs' fifth appearance in your annual swimsuit issue ('70, '72, '74, '75, '76), not her fourth. Her absence in '71 and '73 shows your shocking disregard of your readers' best interests.
PAUL JOHNSON
Boston

Sir:
Sun, sand, surf, swimsuits and sirens are all well and good, but yours is, after all, a sports magazine and I feel you have failed to answer some vital questions:

1) Yvette is beautiful, but can she go to her left?

2) Yvonne is super, but can she hit major league pitching?

3) Cheryl is lovely, but can she audible the blitz?

4) Christie is a doll, but can she consistently sink seven-footers?

5) Who cares?

Thanks. I needed that issue.
JIM MILLER
East Lansing, Mich.

Sir:
Damn the irate subscribers; full speed ahead.
TOM SQUITIERI
Lower Burrell, Pa.

Sir:
In spite of a few chauvinistic remarks about how it can "teach a man or boy the toughness of the desert," I really enjoyed Robert F. Jones' article on Baja. What worries me, though, is that such a vivid account of all the fun to be had down there is going to inspire hordes of "intrepid" adventurers to swarm over a land that isn't ready for them. Despite all those images of toughness and fierceness conjured up in most of us, the desert is actually a very frail place, acutely sensitive to man's mechanical encroachments. I am sorry that Mr. Jones did not add a few words of caution.
TOM SHELTON
Arlington, Va.

BOUQUETS
Sir:
In response to your question in SCORECARD (Jan. 12) referring to the European UPI poll that selected male and female athletes of the year for the entire world, Joao Oliveira is a Brazilian Army corporal. In the 1975 Pan-Am Games he won the long jump at 26'10½" and set a world record of 58'8¼" in the triple jump. As to who Nadia Comaneci is, I guess I'm a male chauvinist.
SAUL NEWMAN
Far Rockaway, N.Y.

Sir:
To answer your question: Nadia Comaneci is a fantastic young gymnast from Rumania who did such a great job competing in European matches that she is considered to be much better than Olga Korbut ever was or will be. I'm not sure if she has competed against the Russians, but she should do well against them in Montreal.

As for Jo√£o Oliveira, I can't pronounce his name, much less know him.
GARY BAILEY
Moline, Ill.

DAVIS CUP
Sir:
Thank you for the fair and accurate treatment of the U.S. vs. Mexico Davis Cup competition as reported in SCORECARD (Jan. 5). It was unfair to Mexico's inspired performance for others to state that Mexico should not have won.

Our U.S. players took the match very seriously and tried especially hard, perhaps even too hard. The officiating was excellent and extremely fair to the U.S. It just happened that at that particular time and under those particular conditions the Mexican team was better.
STANLEY MALLESS
President
United States Lawn Tennis Assn.
New York

SOLUTIONS
Sir:
Since we won't have any peace until the matter of the TV replay for disputed NFL calls is settled, I offer this suggestion:

A coach who wishes to challenge a call may do so, but only by using one of his team's time-outs. The officials would then gather in front of a sideline network TV monitor, and the alleged infraction would be replayed from all angles. The officials would make their decision, and the call would either be sustained or changed. However, if the officials felt that the available video tape precluded a clear-cut determination, the original call would stand.

This makes the appeal costly enough not to be abused, lessens the delay of the game and should stop some of the Monday morning second-guessing.
MICHAEL S. GREEN
Severn, Md.

Sir:
I would like to present what I feel is a possible solution to the problem of the reserve clauses in baseball and football. The owners and the players associations should negotiate maximum team salaries. The players would then have complete freedom to move between teams, but the richer owners could not buy up all the best talent, since they would be limited by the amount they could spend for the entire team.

There could be a sliding scale with teams whose players' average years of experience are higher allowed a slightly higher total team salary. The negotiators could include other variables under this basic plan. Of course, the system would have to be policed to prevent under-the-counter payoffs, offseason employment, etc.

But whatever compromise is reached, I hope to read more sports reporting and less court reporting.
DAVID E. EDELSCHICK
Marquette Heights, Ill.

MASTER BROWNE
Sir:
Admittedly, Walter Browne's extraordinary abilities and unyielding desire to be the best are commendable (Making All the Right Moves Jan. 12). Nonetheless, Ray Kennedy's lucid description of Browne's personality and life-style is compelling enough to overshadow any and all of his miraculous accomplishments. Diverted by his bona fide championship talents and his boundless energy, it becomes too easy for one to ignore Browne's undeniable belligerence.

Had he remained in school, naturally lamenting the fact that "school is for the masses, not for geniuses," Browne might have become a bit more socialized. Maybe. Harnessing his foam-at-the-mouth killer instincts, and remolding that ogrelike character might not have been a bad idea.
PETER J. KAPLAN
Brookline, Mass.

Sir:
As one who has spent untold hours poring over scores of agonizing losses, glorious wins and tortuous draws, I was truly grateful to see a piece describing chess players as other than the boring, intellectual stereotypes so often depicted by journalists and other non-chess-playing members of our society.

Chess is the only board game which is almost totally devoid of the element of luck. Only iron logic determines the outcome. Therefore it comes as no surprise that Browne has also mastered poker, backgammon, Scrabble and other, more socially attuned games. He is simply applying the same techniques learned on the chessboard to his other endeavors.

It is tragic to see great young masters such as Browne, Rogoff and others having to scrape up poker winnings and life savings to be able to compete in international tournaments. The Soviets, meanwhile, send their players around the world at government expense in order to guard their reputation of having the strongest players in the world.

Perhaps in 1978, if Browne or the still-dangerous Fischer can beat Karpov for the world title, Americans will afford chess masters their rightful position among the highest intellectual artists in society.
RALPH E. ALDEN
Phoenix, Ariz.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)