19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKEOVER

February 09, 1976

SUPER STEELERS II
Sir:
For an avid Dallas Cowboy fan, the Super Bowl loss was a bitter pill to swallow. But thanks to a few days of recuperation and your article (Dallas Feels the Steeler Crunch, Jan. 26), I've regained my appetite and can now sleep at night. Dan Jenkins' story made me realize that the Cowboys have a lot to be proud of. Their tremendous season fell just one miracle short of the ultimate goal.
STEVE ZERULL
Arlington Heights, Ill.

Sir:
Is there any question, any doubt, that Pittsburgh is the finest defensive team playing football today?
M. T. ROBINSON
Hollywood

Sir:
The Pittsburgh Steelers played an exceptionally good game, as illustrated in your article. However, keep in mind the final score: 21-17. With only a four-point difference, don't you think Dallas deserved at least one photograph depicting a successful Cowboy play?
BOB THOMPSON
Kennett Square, Pa.

Sir:
Cowboy Cornerback Mark Washington has no reason to feel bad. Pittsburgh's No. 88, Lynn Swann, could catch a snow-flake in a wind tunnel. I'm a Dallas fan from way back, but, my, that Swann can fly!
PAUL HARRINGTON
Toronto, Ontario

RUTGERS' CLAIMS TO FAME
Sir:
Thanks for the article on Rutgers' fine basketball team (Fresh Rapids on the Old Raritan, Jan. 26). During the past two or three seasons, Eastern teams like Rutgers, Syracuse and Pitt (I wish I could say West Virginia) have had very successful basketball campaigns, but they have rarely gotten nationwide publicity. Rutgers is a super team and, like every other Eastern basketball fan, I hope it doesn't choke near the finish.
BOB JACOBS
Charleston, W. Va.

Sir:
It is discouraging, disgusting and disappointing to note the publicity given Rutgers. Even though the Scarlet Knights won't play a Top Ten team, you rank them No. 1 in the East. Do you honestly believe they could defeat Maryland or Carolina or any ACC school? Their undefeated status only reflects their patsy schedule.
STEVEN D. NEWMARK
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Sir:
Larry Keith's article contains a slight error that I believe you would want called to your attention. It is the reference to Rutgers alumnus Joyce Kilmer's home being an American Legion Post. This is no longer correct. In 1969 the State of New Jersey's Historical Sites Division purchased the Kilmer home to preserve it as a historical landmark. On June 29, 1972 a group of interested citizens formed the Joyce Kilmer Birthplace Restoration Committee, and the home has since been leased to this committee by the state. In 1973 American Legion Post No. 25, which had occupied the building for many years, joined with the nearby Milltown American Legion Post.
JOHN V. DONNELLY
Trustee
Joyce Kilmer Birthplace Association
New Brunswick, N.J.

TACKY TOUR
Sir:
The contrast presented in your Jan. 26 issue between The Tacky Triangle (An Honest Travel Story) and Sanibel Island (Island Paradise, Perhaps) is noteworthy. As a native of Florida (I grew up two miles from the Monkey Jungle), I can only wish that the attitudes that are saving Sanibel had prevailed statewide 30 years ago, when Florida was still fresh, open and uncrowded. Ironically, the developers and hucksters destroyed everything that made southern Florida a place people wanted to visit. Instead of a semitropical bounty, there is now Asphalt Ugly. The only thing unspoiled is the sunshine—and, let us hope, Sanibel.
ARLETTE FONTAINE MILLER
Richmond

Sir:
All we can say about Frank Deford's article is that Florida is a great place to live, but we wouldn't want to visit it.
ALAN AND HARRIET GORDON
Jacksonville

Sir:
Frank Deford is to be commended for a fine tribute to The Tacky Triangle. Now I know that I've got to see Cypress Gardens and the Aquamaids' pyramid. Four pillow-maps! Gee!
FRED STEDTLER
Old Tappan, N.J.

Sir:
For any of your readers who fear The Tacky Triangle described by Frank Deford, we would like to report that after extensive research we have discovered that during the winter months Florida attracts a bushel basketful of writers on expense accounts. Many, especially those who live in New York, often disappear. Their whereabouts can now be disclosed. They have simply moved to Florida. Who wouldn't rather live in Florida? But just in case some of your readers don't understand and still have some fear of getting lost, we would be happy to supply them with the 1976 edition of our Florida Attractions Guide Map.

We would rate Deford's article at about 1½ pillows.
DON MEIKLEJOHN
Executive Director
Florida Attractions Association
Tallahassee, Fla.

SMEW SIGHTERS
Sir:
In SCORECARD (Jan. 19) there was an item about the sighting of a smew in Newport. It mentioned that I was the one who found the bird. I should like you to correct this and give credit to Robert Bushnell and Hugh Willoughby, who discovered the smew and then called me. I saw it and confirmed it.
CHARLES WOOD
Providence

Sir:
I enjoyed reading about Baja California (Baja: Road to Adventure, Jan. 19), and my husband Paul enjoyed the photos. I must tell you, though, that Baja is no longer the "forgotten peninsula" for golfers. A beautiful links has been created by my father, Percy Clifford, near Ensenada. It is called Bajamar. Golfers there will be hardpressed to keep their minds on their games. Baja California is truly beautiful country.
SANDRA CLIFFORD FULLMER
Glenview, Ill.

Sir:
Having spent last February in Baja, it was with great interest that I read the fine feature. I take exception, however, to Robert F. Jones' less than kind words about the Hotel Finisterra. My wife and I stayed there for two weeks and found the food to be excellent. The staff was very courteous and accommodating. In fact, while I was there, people were checking out of other hotels and into the Finisterra because of its excellence.
WILFRED KAY
Westerly, R.I.

BLOW FOR BLOW
Sir:
Here's hoping that Mark Mulvoy (This Was Détente, Philly Style, Jan. 19) and his ilk were not shocked and disappointed when Mean Joe Greene and company decided not to play touch football in the Super Bowl. The Soviet hockey team's psych job worked, but on the wrong targets—primarily the American sportswriters. To hear the Soviet coach tell it, we should believe that the Russians invented the sport with the intention that it be a kind of ice ballet and that the North American body check is a nasty capitalistic perversion.

How many more Stanley Cups must the Flyers win to prove that they are a magnificent hockey team loaded with talent, desire and dedication and that Fred Shero is the greatest hockey coach in the world? Come on, Mark, give them their due.
JOHN R. NORMAN JR.
Exton, Pa.

Sir:
What a shame! The Flyers play one of their finest games ever, and all Mark Mulvoy writes about is détente and the alleged "assault" on the Soviet Army Club team. Some credit could have been given to the fine play by Don Saleski, Orest Kindrachuk, Joe and Jim Watson, Larry Goodenough and Rick MacLeish. After all, the Soviets were being touted as invincible before the game and Philadelphia did win. It took more than the Hammer, Moose and Torro to score goals.
MARK W. SIMON
Doylestown, Pa.

Sir:
The Jan. 11 game between the Soviet Army Club and the Philadelphia Flyers was a disgrace to the National Hockey League. I admire the Flyers' talents as aggressive players, but slamming opponents into the boards or shoving sticks in their faces shows a complete lack of class and sportsmanship. Coach Fred Shero's "gang" ruined what should have been a classic confrontation between two great teams.
PATRICK DAILEY
Schaumburg, Ill.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
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HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)