19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

February 16, 1976

TATUM'S TURN
Sir:
Being a resident of North Carolina and a student at Marquette, I have had several opportunities to watch David Thompson and Earl Tatum in action. Marquette Coach Al McGuire has made some fancy statements in his day, but saying that Tatum is better than Thompson (Watched Pot That Finally Boiled, Feb. 2) takes the cake. Tatum has finally put together a string of more than a dozen well-played games while Thompson had a string that spanned an entire college career.
DICK HILLMANN
Milwaukee

Sir:
Marquette lost to North Carolina State 76-64 in the NCAA final on March 25, 1974. Where was "the black Jerry West" on that night as David Thompson plied the friendly skies of the Greensboro Coliseum for 21 points? How can Al McGuire even think of mentioning Tatum and Thompson in the same sentence?
GENE O. CARMACK II
Harvey, Ill.

Sir:
Earl Tatum has it together, as does Marquette. Al McGuire knows it and so do all Warrior fans across the nation.
SCOT LADE
Waukesha, Wis.

BULLISH IN CHICAGO
Sir:
Curry Kirkpatrick's article (Choice Seats at the Bull Ring, Feb. 2) was almost too painful for a Chicago Bulls fan to read. He touched on every facet of a team for which only people who are a bit masochistic can continue to root—from the miserly ownership to the perpetually disgruntled players to Dick Motta, a coach with all the tact of Attila the Hun.

The saddest part of the entire Bulls story, though, is the shameful treatment accorded Chet Walker, a man who exudes class. If basketball fans never see Chet the Jet's magic again, they will remember his class. The Bulls would do well to remember it, too.
JIM EPSTEIN
Evanston, Ill.

Sir:
It is always a pleasure to read about such a happy and contented team as the Chicago Bulls. There is obviously nothing wrong with the Bulls that a new coach, a new city and a new team would not cure.
DAVID R. CASPER
Hanover, N.H.

FOREMAN'S DUES
Sir:
Thank you for publishing the pictures of the Foreman-Lyle match (Sweet Science, Indeed, Feb. 2). This was by far the best fight since Ali-Frazier. Four knockdowns (two by each fighter, including the final knockout) is a lot more exciting than watching Ali doing his "rope a dope" act, clowning around and fighting opponents not even ranked.
TIM BURGESS
Keyser, W. Va.

Sir:
The photos of the Lyle-Foreman fight were great. But where was the article?
MICHAEL LYNCH
Madison, N.J.

Sir:
No, the fight "did not set boxing back 25 years." It was more like 50. The only thing that George Foreman proved by beating up Ron Lyle, and being beaten up by Lyle, was that he can be a punching bag and also use one. To call what happened in Las Vegas a boxing match would only disgrace boxing as a sport. To see one man corner another and beat him unmercifully, as Foreman did to Lyle, was sickening. (Perhaps more sickening was the fact that the referee never made a move to stop the brawl when it was evident that the only way Lyle could fall was for Foreman to stand back and let him.) It is surprising that SI deemed the event worthy of mention.

If Foreman is ever unlucky enough to fight Ali again, his one consolation may be the knowledge that Ali will ask the referee to stop the fight before it becomes a slaughter, as he has done in the past. George has paid his dues, but the championship doesn't come that cheap.
MARK B. STAUFFER
Williamstown, W. Va.

LUGING PROPOSITION
Sir:
Thank you for the deeply touching article on our luge team and its coach (Some Win and Some Luge, Feb. 2). I am sorry that the pitiful financial state of the American luge team was not brought to the attention of the public earlier, while there was still time to do something about it. Even if there were not time or adequate funding to build, for instance, an Olympic-caliber run, I'm sure we (the American people) would have pitched in enough to ensure that a man like Piotr Rogowski would be paid more than the insulting sum of $3 a day.
J. BERNARD
Boulder, Colo.

SHARED RECORD
Sir:
Being a Michigan football fan, it is with much regret that I inform you that Lynn Swann did not set the record for consecutive bowl appearances (SCORECARD, Feb. 2). That honor goes to Archie Griffin and six of his teammates, who graduated (thank goodness) from Ohio State this year after appearing four straight years in the Rose Bowl.
GREGORY HARTSOE
Flint, Mich.

Sir:
I believe that with the advent of freshman eligibility a number of college football players may share the record for successive bowl appearances. Two who immediately come to mind are twin brothers Dave and Don Buckey of North Carolina State. They have appeared in four straight bowl games: the Peach in 1972 (Dave was MVP), the Liberty in 1973, the Astro-Bluebonnet in 1974 and the Peach again in 1975.
LESLIE A. FARFOUR JR.
Shelby, N.C.

CULLING THE HERD
Sir:
Granted, the permit system of culling an overpopulation of 2,000 elk from the northern herd of Yellowstone Park (Shooting Elk in a Barrel, Feb. 2) removes some of the pure sport of hunting. Nonetheless, all sportsmen and wildlife management personnel should take exception to Russell Chatham's view: "But for all of this and the justification of the shooting as a means of culling the herd, one begins to wonder if nature's way, with its ruthless efficiency leading to only the strong surviving, might not be better."

We would only ask whether Chatham has ever witnessed the slow, agonizing starvation of 2,000 elk in the deep snows of winter. In the winter of 1974-75, 2,000 elk died in just that way because hunting the surplus was not permitted.
JACK SAMSON
Editor
Field & Stream
New York City

Sir:
It is obvious that Russell Chatham misses the message regarding the culling of excess animals. He erroneously assumes that people consider this sport, when in actuality it is considered nothing more than humane harvesting.
JAMES C. BARACKMAN
Texarkana, Texas

Sir:
Russell Chatham told it like it really is on the Gardiner, Mont, special hunt, and the same also applies to the Gallatin special hunt at the northwest corner of Yellowstone Park. I wish he could have included it in his article, too.

I hunted in both of these "slaughters" a few times when I was too young to know better, and I regret having to admit it. At one time I watched better than 1,000 men march across Deckard Flat slaughtering elk ahead of them, as though it would be the last elk each man would ever shoot. I've also seen men get into fights over a dead elk, and even take potshots at one another.

I lived in nearby Livingston for 23 years and I can assure you that everything that went on in these two hunts did not hit the newspapers. Watching those incidents, I have pretty much hung up my gun. It is like "shooting a cow."
DAN MARTIN
Loomis, Wash.

ALASKA SLED DOGS
Sir:
I enjoyed the story Pull North to Nome (Jan. 19) by Coles Phinizy. However, on Jan. 27, tragedy struck. Nugget, the feature dog of the story and the winner of the 1974 and 1975 Iditarod races, was hit and killed by a car. She had apparently freed herself from her harness during a practice run and wandered off, leading to the accident.
RICHARD FOX
Anchorage, Alaska

•SI is sorry to report the death that same week of musher Bill Vaudrin, who was killed when his car hit a moose on the Anchorage-Fairbanks Highway.—ED.

Sir:
Pull North to Nome was one of the best articles you have ever published. Coles Phinizy knows his subjects well: the husky, the people, the country. He draws a very real and vivid picture.
WALT WOODIN
Little Genessee, N.Y.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, TIME & LIFE Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)