19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 18, 1976

MONTREAL MARCH
Sir:
Apparently Jerry Kirshenbaum (Good Times by the Cut-ups, June 28) missed some great performances while covering the U.S. Swimming Trials in Long Beach. While reporting that the American women "looked as if they were in shock" in the wake of the East German Trials, he neglected to even mention some notable occurrences—like an American record in the 200 back by Maryanne Graham and another American record in the 200 fly by 1972 gold medalist Karen Thornton.

No one is going to argue that the East Germans are anything short of awesome, and unquestionably Shirley Babashoff is the class of the American squad, but the rest of the U.S. team deserved better than Kirshenbaum's account.
LEE GREEN
Los Angeles

Sir:
I enjoyed your article about the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials (Marching on Montreal, July 5), but you failed to mention one occurrence that took more guts and determination than anything I've seen in a long time. In the 10,000-meter run, a race of more than six miles, Garry Bjorklund lost his left shoe during the race and had to run the rest of the way wearing only one shoe. At the end, Garry gallantly kicked past Bill Rodgers to finish in third place and win a spot on the Olympic team.
PAUL KELLEY
Roseville, Minn.

Sir:
Your article failed to mention one high-schooler on the U.S. track and field team. She is 16-year-old Rhonda Brady of Calumet Township High School (Gary, Ind.) in the women's 100-meter hurdles. Her winning time was under the American record but was not allowed, as she was helped by an excessive following wind. Rhonda is the youngest member of the 1976 squad. She has been running strong all season, and with the rest of the "unknowns" who have made the 1976 squad, the track and field competition will be right at world-record pace. Keep her name in mind.
R. FERRIS
Hammond, Ind.

Sir:
William Johnson's article (Bronx Boy Makes Good, July 5) was every bit as realistic as its subject, Steve Kelly. The true spirit of amateurism as practiced by Kelly and countless other athletes illuminates the value of Olympic competition. Obviously, nationalism, glory and money don't drive these superb athletes, which in these days is a refreshing change. I might even pay money to watch Steve Kelly perform, something I refuse to do for a bunch of $100,000 crybabies and their lawyers, agents and egos.
STEVEN J. SMITH
Madison, Wis.

Sir:
In today's world of greedy athletes, including ex-Olympians, Steve Kelly is certainly one of a kind. Even if he is not one of the best paddlers in the world, I feel that he is one of the best men in sports today. Congratulations to him for being what a man and an amateur athlete should be.
ROBERT W. LONARDO
Providence

HIP, HIP
Sir:
Much to my delight, pro basketball will once again be played by only one league. And the NBA-ABA merger (One Last Hurrah in Hyannis, June 28) could be the panacea for the pro game's ills. An effective de-escalation of the player salary war may now be achieved. Part-time guards may cease to earn more than corporate executives. More important, the merger allows Dr. J to set up practice on national television.
MARK KISZLA
Nashville

Sir:
In your listing of former ABA franchises, you overlooked the Texas Chaparrals. Dallas renamed itself one year and played some home games in Fort Worth and Lubbock. The experiment ended on a cold January night in Fort Worth when only 500 fans (including my father and me) showed up to watch John Brisker score 42 points and lead the Pittsburgh Condors to a narrow win. After that the Chaps moved all their games back to Dallas, but I still have my Texas Chaparral pennant, and my memories of Manny Leaks' leaky defense.
BRUCE G. HOPKINS
Fort Worth

FOOTBALL FACTORIES
Sir:
After reading in SCORECARD (June 28) of the business motives behind the rescheduling of Indiana U's home football games, as well as of the low percentage of pro football players completing their college educations, I've a suggestion to make. Why not remove the myth of collegiate athletics as strictly sport and allow those athletes being trained for the professional ranks to move about freely among those schools which offer them the best chance to achieve their ambitions? Just to maintain some of the aura of the educational environment, though, the headlines announcing an interschool football trade could, for example, read, "State U trades hard-running history major to City Tech for malcontented mathback."
BILL LUKOSAVICH
Houston

THE FIGHT
Sir:
Carlos Monzon again showed his mettle by toying with the fine Rodrigo Valdes (There Was a Fight in Monaco, July 5). Nearing the end of his remarkable career, Monzon surely should be acclaimed the greatest active fighter, Ali not excepted.
BRAD KERSEY
Las Vegas

THE FARCE
Sir:
I love two things about equally in this world, my country and Muhammad Ali. The Bicentennial reinforced the love for my country, but the Ali-Inoki so-called fight (...But Only a Farce in Tokyo, July 5) did little for my admiration of the world's heavyweight boxing champion.
WENDY LAMOUR
Houston

Sir:
Before everyone screams in outrage over the recent Ali-Inoki "match," look at the two things that were proved in the bout.

1. It is senseless to attempt such showdowns—both fighters followed the rules of their games, and hardly ever came in contact.

2. Ali is certainly the master showman of our era. I paid my $10 and had an enjoyable evening, although the fight wasn't quite what I expected. Some of the best action was the fans leaving the arena.

Long live P.T. Barnum!
EUGENE F. MCCOLGAN
St. Petersburg, Fla.

Sir:
Too bad the match wasn't as good as your article.
MICHAEL KINGOFF
Wilmington, N.C.

HANDICAPPERS
Sir:
I would like to commend Bill Leggett for his fine article All That Glitters Is Not Gold (June 28). Horse racing goes far, far beyond the Triple Crown and deserves much more recognition throughout the year. Great horses like Master Derby, Royal Glint and Ancient Title should be written about more often. After the Honest Pleasures are finished in June, it's the handicappers that roll on.
JAMES SCUILLI
Pittsburgh

MA BELL
Sir:
It was with some interest that I read your comment in SCORECARD (June 28) concerning Michigan Bell's offer to sell maize and blue telephones as a status symbol to Wolverine fans. Perhaps they got the idea from my daughter Polly, who in December of 1970, while a senior in high school, was searching for the ideal Christmas gift for me. It's been said that, like Bob Ufer, I too have maize and blue blood flowing through my veins. Polly went to the Michigan Bell offices and asked if they had a maize and blue telephone. Not quite. They had a yellow phone with a yellow cord, but at that time their blue was a very pale tone. They offered to specially paint the phone cradle a darker blue and to attach the yellow handset to it. This they did and they even delivered it to my house the day before Christmas. It's still on my desk and has served as a conversation piece for these past 5½ years. Ma Bell is to be congratulated for her insight into status symbols. But that old devil inflation certainly has taken hold. My telephone, specially painted and with four outside lines and an intercom system, cost $26 in 1970. Now you say the cost is $54.95? Anyway, Go Blue!
BLAINE ZIMMERMAN
Monroe, Mich.

BSA IS NOT A VINCENT
Sir:
Please inform Sam Moses (Wind Her Up and Hang On, July 5) that a BSA motorcycle is not a Vincent! This is akin to calling a Ford a Bugatti. Beese Wendt's magnificent Vincent (destroked from 1,000 cc to 750) is a sight to behold—and hear. His continued competitiveness is a tribute to individual persistence and to those design features that make the Vincent, despite being out of production for 21 years, the world's greatest motorcycle.
PAUL G. ROCHMIS
Annandale, Va.

PATE'S STATE
Sir:
Immediately after reading your article on the U.S. Open (You Were Great, Jerry Pate, June 28), I felt I should let Dan Jenkins know that even though Jerry Pate was born in Georgia, he early on moved here to Pensacola and his home has been here since. I believe this should qualify Jerry as a "lean Floridian" as opposed to the "lean Georgian."

I would like to thank Mr. Jenkins, however, for his praise of Jerry. All of us in Pensacola are extremely proud of his tremendous accomplishment.
JIMMY ECKERT
Pensacola, Fla.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)