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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Aug. 22, 1977
Aug. 22, 1977

Table of Contents
Aug. 22, 1977

Battle Of The Ages
Reds Are Blue
New Charge
Sultan Of Swipes
Baseball
Hocker
Chess
Volleyball
Olympics
Harness Racing
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

BIRD CALLS
Sir:
Thanks for the fine article by Larry Keith on the Baltimore Orioles (Revival and Survival, Aug. 8). And an extra thanks for keeping them off your cover, which has been known to jinx many a pennant contender.
BRUCE LANCASTER
Baton Rouge

This is an article from the Aug. 22, 1977 issue Original Layout

Sir:
Thank you, Mr. Keith. It is about time the talent of Earl Weaver was appreciated. Now maybe the front office can work a deal to bring back Frank Robinson as a player.
JAY TURNER
Santa Ana, Calif.

Sir:
The Orioles and Yankees are battling for second place because the Red Sox are going all the way.
KARL HEDLUND
Beaverton, Ore.

Sir:
Baltimore lacks the potent offense of the Red Sox and Yankees. By the end of the season they should end up third, behind second-place New York and first-place Boston.
BILL ROCHE
Dedham, Mass.

Sir:
"Billy [Martin] is going to be fired at the end of the year no matter what he does or how well the team plays."

This is very distressing, especially for a Yankee fan. The firing of the best manager in baseball would be the worst mistake Gabe Paul and George Steinbrenner could make.
DOT HORNER
Manasquan, N.J.

Sir:
If the Orioles win the division, maybe Steinbrenner will finally learn his lesson: buying free agents does not a pennant make.
MARK MAGHAKIAN
Bronx, N.Y.

Sir:
My nomination for Rookie of the Year is Eddie Murray, the biggest Yankee killer since General Robert E. Lee.
JIM OWEN
Madison, Wis.

BILL DUE
Sir:
How can you have the gall in your Aug. 8 issue to name as Player of the Week someone other than Bill Robinson? As you well know, Robinson had four home runs, two of them grand slams. He also had 13 RBIs. Many players do not have two grand slams in their career, let alone two in three days. Granted, Jim Barr pitched two shutouts in the week, but Robinson's achievement is truly remarkable. I am deeply disappointed and trust you will choose more carefully in the future.
KEN STRINGERT
Pittsburgh

Sir:
Jim Barr's two shutouts were impressive, but he had nowhere near the week, nor the season, that Bill Robinson has had. Robinson's underrated clutch play has gone unnoticed all season, and that's too long.
RICHARD DALRYMPLE
Pittsburgh

•For a very early notice of Robinson, see SI, April 25.—ED.

Sir:
I believe Bob Dunn was guilty of a shocking omission in his article A Bargain, and Bye-Bye Basement (Aug. 8). Ellis Valentine's "gun" may be in a class with the "legendary arms" of Clemente and Furillo—but, gentlemen, Rocky Colavito's arm was in a class by itself!
EARL W. DUIGNAN
Grosse Pointe, Mich.

•Maybe, but Rocky took forever loading up.—ED.

MILLER'S HIGH LIFE
Sir:
Hi, I'm Mark Miller* and I don't smoke. But I still enjoy tobacco, with Copenhagen and sunflower seeds. Yeah, just a few pinches of Copenhagen between ma cheek and gum and a handful of seeds in ma cheeks and I'm all set. I look like a cross between Walt Garrison and a chipmunk but it keeps me alert while counting salmon and watching for grizzly bears. Sets up a right nice rhythm and I can enjoy it anytime. Spit and chew, spit and chew! Only problem is I can't spit through my mosquito head net like Johnny Bench can through his catcher's mask. "Patooey!" Happy chews!

*World-famous fish counter.
MARK MILLER
Cordova, Alaska

EARLY LINE
Sir:
Can you please tell me the magic number for the Los Angeles Dodgers?
SCOTT W. BERRY
Jenison, Mich.

•As of Sunday night, 34.—ED.

MO-PED SPOKESMEN
Sir:
Having recently spilled off my Honda 350, your article Driven by Mo-Ped Madness (Aug. 8) hit me, you might say, where it hurts. The accompanying photographs, showing many mo-ped riders in shorts and one without a shirt, made me doubly thankful that I was wearing Levi's and a shirt when I fell.

As for Commissioner Alsdorf's statement that mo-peds are not able to reach speeds that are "suicidal," 30 mph may not be suicidal, but I will be feeling my 30-mph, fully clothed fall for quite a while. I wonder how the young man in the photograph standing on his mo-ped would feel after falling at 30 mph without a helmet?
JOHN DAVLANTES
Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich.

Sir:
You brought out all the good points about the mo-ped phenomenon, but what about the bad ones? In our town there have already been two deaths and one injury.
ROSS LEVINSOHN
Tenafly, N.J.

CHALK ONE UP
Sir:
Your story on pool hustling (Easy Times the Hard Way, Aug. 8) was excellent. It's nice to know the inside truths of the life of a pool hustler.
JIM THORNBER
Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Sir:
Although I am now teaching at Bishop Amat High School in La Puente, Calif., I did at one time tend bar in Phoenix. While there, I had many occasions to observe the "Danny Ds" on a daily basis.

I would like to congratulate Barry McDermott for his excellent, heartwarming "behind-the-scenes" article on Danny DiLiberto.
ROBERT PARSONS
Upland, Calif.

SHOOTING STAR
Sir:
Immediately after reading about Elgin Gates (If You Call Him Old Folks, Be Prepared to Duck, Aug. 8), I made plans to skip down to Vandalia, Ohio to watch him take on the trapshooting elite of the U.S. armed forces.

After that, I am going to Omaha to see the 145 stuffed heads and other pieces of animals this man collected.

Then I'll come back home and wait for your next article on saving grizzlies or whales or eagles and try to figure out SI's editorial policy toward wildlife in general and endangered species in particular.
RICHARD S. WELLS
Pittsburgh

Sir:
Elgin Gates is certainly to be congratulated for his records in outboard motorboat racing and trapshooting, but anybody who would roam the world, trophy hunting—while others roam it trying to save species—can only be classified as someone with an overinflated ego.
RICHARD EVANS
Kauai, Hawaii

Sir:
I was extremely pleased to see SI finally carry an article on one of the shooting sports.
THOMAS J. EARDLEY
Wyoming, Mich.

KNOCKOUT
Sir:
Thank you, Pat Putnam and SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. I've never read a better article than Putnam's A Star Bows Out, A Star Bows In (Aug. 8). It is the work of a true pro.
MITCH BEYER
Milwaukee

Sir:
Congratulations on a fine article on an outstanding fighter. I just hope Carlos Monzon has the common sense to quit before he becomes another Muhammad Ali.
VAL RUOFF
Rochester, N.Y.

Sir:
Monzon the Magnificent would have been Monzon the Mummified had he been around during the Golden Age of middleweights. There is no doubt that Zale, Graziano, Sugar Ray and La Motta would have put him away. Hammerin' Henry Armstrong, too. Fortunately for Carlos, the only stars he saw at that time were the paper ones he was making in kindergarten.
EMIL J. SMITH
Camden, N.J.

Sir:
While I agree that Carlos Monzon is one of the greatest fighters of all time, he hasn't won 83 fights in a row as you say on the cover of the Aug. 8 issue. He has had 74 victories and nine draws, and considering that the majority of his draws occurred in his native Argentina, it's likely that he really lost a few of those fights (the first Bennie Briscoe bout in 1967 in particular).
NEIL TERENS
JACK OBERMAYER
Brooklyn

NO. 9 WAS FINE
Sir:
The day I received my copy of SI containing Glenn Braverman's letter pointing out that the day he received his copy of SI with Ted Williams on the cover, Carl Yastrzemski passed Williams on the all-time Red Sox hit list, our house guests from Stamford, Conn. arrived for the weekend.

Neither the arrival of house guests from Stamford nor the number of hits that Carl Yastrzemski has has any bearing on the fact that Ted Williams is one of the best hitters, if not the best, to have played professional baseball.

If Mr. Braverman is implying that Carl Yastrzemski is a better hitter than Ted Williams, then Mr. Braverman is either very young, myopic, uninformed or two or more of the preceding.
KENNETH D. ANDERSON
Concord, Maine

JACK BACKER
Sir:
Ben Wright's article A New Reign in Spain (Aug. 8) was indeed refreshing. One hopes these youngsters and their "grandfather" (Gallardo) will frequent the American tour more often.

But I venture to say that the "rocking and blocking" swing of Jack Nicklaus will continue to dominate the world's golfing scene for many years to come.
SCOTT LEWELLYN
Columbus, Ohio

DEL MARRED
Sir:
Your next to last paragraph (SCORECARD, Aug. 8)..."the sun set prettily over the Pacific, out beyond the first turn." The first turn, or clubhouse turn, is on the east end of the track (racing counterclockwise). The far turn, the final turn before hitting the stretch is on the west end of Del Mar. The sun rises in the east and sets in the west, doesn't it? The story was cute, but your orientation is off by 180°.
STEVE MCNURLIN
Torrance, Calif.

DOUBLE TROUBLE
Sir:
In your issue of Aug. 8 (SCORECARD) there was mention of Audrey Scruggs, the pitcher in the Braves system who throws left-handed and right-handed.

I have tried to imagine for a long time what would happen if he were to face a switch-hitter! Boggles the mind.
JIM WARNER
Buffalo

•Rule 9.01 [c] would allow the umpire to make the pitcher designate which side he intends to pitch from and continue this way until the batter has been retired.—ED.

BYE, BYE, CHI
Sir:
A few weeks ago you featured the Chicago Cubs. Now they are seven games behind Philadelphia. I love the Yankees. Please don't write about them.
AMY DODD
Hicksville, N.Y.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, New York, 10020.