19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 09, 1978

RAPID RON
Sir:
Ron Guidry may be on his way to becoming one of the great pitchers (Unbeaten, and All But Untouchable, June 26), but one must remember that the season is not even half over. The true test doesn't come until after the All-Star break, when Guidry will have to continue to produce. I hear fellow Yankee fans talking about Guidry's having an undefeated season and breaking Nolan Ryan's 1973 record of 383 strikeouts, but it seems unlikely. In every game this year, Guidry has been throwing smoke, and his arm may not be able to withstand the strain. The Yankees' main concern shouldn't be keeping Guidry's streak alive, but catching Boston.
DUANE E. DOUGLAS
Brooklyn

Sir:
It is refreshing to note that although Ron Guidry is 12-0 and the ace of the Yankee staff, he is not seeking to renegotiate his contract, even though he is in an industry which has so many overnight millionaires. I would like to see some of his fellow—and wealthier—Yankees learn a lesson from his attitude, determination and humility.
P.M. SOLENICK
White Plains, N.Y.

Sir:
Your article on Ron Guidry was all fine and dandy, but what about Tom Seaver and his no-hitter? True, you have followed Tom through good times and bad, but when he achieves this supreme goal, he's relegated to "Player of the Week."
DANNY CLEMENS
Fort Wayne, Ind.

Sir:
Ron Guidry deserves all credit for his magnificent pitching, but writer Larry Keith says Guidry's 18 strikeouts in one game "fell one short of the major league record held by Steve Carlton, Tom Seaver and Nolan Ryan." According to my record book, the major league record is not 19, but 20, set by Tom Cheney of the old Washington Senators.
DAVID PAULSON
Columbia, Md.

•The record of 19 strikeouts is for a nine-inning game. Cheney's 21 (not 20) strikeouts, which he achieved against the Baltimore Orioles on Sept. 12, 1962, came in a 16-inning game.—ED.

LONG SEASON
Sir:
Ever since 1965, I have been a Cub fan. I know all too well the agony of September, but I had often wondered if the rest of the U.S. realized just how pennant-starved we Cub fans are. Now E. M. Swift's article (Next Act Is a Cub Flub, June 26) has told them exactly what it's like. I'll always love the Cubs, but just once I wish the season would end at the All-Star break.
DAVID YARNALL
Wildwood, Ill.

Sir:
To be a Cub fan is to find out what life is all about at a very early age. As a Cub fan grows into maturity and confronts what is called the real world, he has already been prepared for virtually every frustration, disappointment and defeat that the realities of the universe can deal him.
WILLIAM E. CARSLEY
Chicago

ANDY'S OPEN
Sir:
Andy North's victory at Cherry Hills (The Bogey That Won the Open, June 26) should be an example to all young golfers. Back in the days when he and I were members of the Nakoma Country Club here, Andy would arrive at the course around 7 a.m. and leave 12 hours later. He would take his two large shag bags to the practice green and stay most of the day chipping and putting; while the rest of us were flipping hamburgers at the local greasy spoon, Andy was flipping wedges out of the practice trap. We thought nothing could be more boring than practicing golf when we could be playing golf. Thus Andy's triumph at the Open was not the culmination of four days of good play, but of many years of hard work.
GREGG SHIMANSKI
Madison, Wis.

Sir:
I really pity J. C. Snead, Andy Bean and Lee Trevino because of all the noise and distractions they had to put up with at the U.S. Open. It is sad when these professionals blame poor shots on such factors. I can't recall Tom Seaver ever blaming a wild pitch on a teammate's shouting encouragement during a windup, or David Thompson missing a foul shot because the fans were screaming too loudly in the stands. If it is quiet that these golfers desire, perhaps they should take up chess.
JIM WELCH
Pittsburgh

Sir:
Andy North? Where was the cover story on Nancy Lopez' fifth straight victory?
JUDY SIMPSON
Indianapolis

Sir:
The officials responsible for giving young pro Bobby Impaglia a two-stroke penalty for slow play should be drawn and quartered (A Ticket for Slowing, June 26). I am sure that if it had been a Jack Nicklaus or an Arnold Palmer, it would never have happened. Anyone with any knowledge of both golf and the importance of the U.S. Open would agree that intense concentration and study are as important as executing the shot properly.
IRWIN GLAUBERMAN
Auburn, N.Y.

ON LAND AND SEA
Sir:
If you are still interested in two-foot-long roaches (A Bargain Monster from the Sea's Basement, June 12), I know of an apartment complex that has them of a suitable size to be walked on leashes.
ANTHONY BREAUX
Litchfield Park, Ariz.

THE SMOGGY GAMES
Sir:
At the end of his story on the 1984 Summer Games (A Flaming Olympian Mess, June 26), William Oscar Johnson concludes that the Games obviously belong in Los Angeles. Why? Even if we could afford the Olympics—which we can't—suppose the weather presents us with a temperature inversion and we have two weeks of smog. Even kindergarten kids are required to stay indoors and not go near playgrounds under such conditions.
G. ZORDICH
Pacific Palisades, Calif.

Sir:
Mr. Johnson senses that logic will prevail and that the Olympics will be held in Los Angeles where, he says, they obviously belong. Mr. Johnson should take his desire to see the Olympics well beyond the boundaries of California. We do not want the '84 Games. Neither politicians nor writers should attempt to force this costly mistake on the already overburdened people of Southern California.
HENRY JOHNSON
Studio City, Calif.

DOGGONE DARTER
Sir:
What bunk! The issue in the Tellico Dam case (SCORECARD, June 26) is not an endangered species but a lousy three-inch fish. The odds against the snail darter containing the cure for anything are enormous. No wonder there is a taxpayer rebellion in this country.
TOM RASCHIO
Milwaukie, Ore.

•For more on the Tellico Dam, see SCORECARD, page 11.—ED.

ERIC EVANS
Sir:
At last our nation's most-hidden champion, kayaker Eric (Hammer) Evans, has been revealed (The Hammer Nails the Nantahala, June 12). Eric's performance on a white-water slalom course is impressive, but no more so than his power technique through practice gates on a flat pond.

Dan Levin's mention of the fact that Evans had to quit his job because it interfered with his training and that he is now having difficulty making ends meet is just one more example of how hard it is for a dedicated U.S. amateur to compete against subsidized athletes from foreign countries.

Levin also noted the elimination of white-water kayak and canoe events from Olympic competition after Munich. More's the pity, because these events evoked a great deal of interest and comment from TV viewers of the Games.

However, regarding Levin's description of the sport as "not only difficult but extremely dangerous," almost all kayakers maintain that the most dangerous portion of any outing is the auto drive to the river!
JACK NICHOL
Billings, Mont.

TOWARD OPEN BADMINTON
Sir:
In SCORECARD (June 12) the item on the subject of open badminton suffers from the omission of an essential fact. While it is true that the International Badminton Federation voted in favor of allowing the sport to go open, and committed itself to setting up the machinery for administering this radical change in the structure of the sport, the federation specifically postponed the beginning of open competition until next year. This was done in order to allow time for drawing up the rules and regulations necessary to implement the plan, the essentials of which, presumably, will be approved at the annual general meeting in May 1979. It is easy to say that badminton will go open, but saying so does not result in the instant creation of a complex format within which two classes of players—amateur and professional—can compete, either within their separate classifications or against each other.
EDWIN S. JARRETT
Vice President
International Badminton Federation
Minneapolis

SOARING EAGLES
Sir:
For weeks I have anxiously searched my copy of SI, expecting your usual superb coverage of a major event in American sports. On Sunday, May 28, at Towson State University near Baltimore, a crowd in the thousands saw the U.S. national rugby team, the American Eagles, defeat the Canadian national team 12-7. This was the Eagles' first victory in international competition and the first for a U.S. team in decades. I believe your readers might enjoy knowing about it.
ROBERT M. KIMMITT
Washington, D.C.

RUNNING ON—AND ON
Sir:
Oh my gosh, where's everybody's sense of humor? I'm referring to the letters responding to the June 5 VIEWPOINT by Frank De-ford on boring articles about running. I read Deford's article one afternoon just before the kids came home and, in a quiet house, I laughed and laughed aloud. There's just one silly sentence in the whole thing: "Running is so palling that those who do it are either functional bores to start with or borderline cases with a bore wish." But when making a point, all writers occasionally overstate their case.

Deford is quite right about one thing—talking incessantly about one's progress, spiritual growth, etc., is absolutely numbing to others. That's one reason this housewife runs at dawn. (Sorry, Frank!)
BARBARA ZANI
Newton Corner, Mass.

Sir:
Frank Deford cracked me up with his caustic comments about the flood of running articles these days. I laughed especially hard when he wrote that he used to believe articles about harness racing were the most boring things imaginable but that stories on running are even worse. My father was an authority on harness horses and edited a magazine on that subject. And I'm an associate editor of a running publication. So if I can only corner Deford at a cocktail party sometime, I guarantee to double-bore him to death! Fittingly, one of several columns I write is called "Running at the Mouth."
NICK MARSHALL
Associate Editor
Runner's Gazette
Lansford, Pa.

ROD FUNSETH
Sir:
Who wants a Rod Funseth (Look for the Man Early, Not Late, June 12)? I do. I have closely followed Rod's amateur and professional career for more than 20 years. I'm excited when he's doing well and feel heartache if he fades, as in the recent Masters.

I grew up in Spokane in the same neighborhood as the Funseths. Walter Bingham's excellent article suggests that Rod is the same fellow that I knew—shy, considerate, sensitive and unsure of his incredible talent. So hang in there, Rod, for me and for the millions of others who like to see nice guys finish first.
J. DANIEL BLODGETT
Grosse Pointe Park, Mich.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, New York, 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)