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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 24, 1978
July 24, 1978

Table of Contents
July 24, 1978

Bonny Victory
Leon Spinks
Phillies
Money In Sports: Part 2
Baseball
Soccer
  • Led by Mike Flanagan, the NASL's leading goal scorer, Boston beat the Cosmos twice and happily found itself, expansion club or no, in first place in its division

Cycling
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Edited by Jerry Kirshenbaum

NANCY'S NAVY
Sir:
After spreading her charisma from Rochester to Sarasota and winning seven LPGA championships in the process, the only way lovely Nancy Lopez (Nancy with the Laughing Face. July 10) could top it would be to part the Red Sea with a nine-iron.
RON JACKSON
Franklin, Ohio

This is an article from the July 24, 1978 issue Original Layout

Sir:
Nancy Lopez' caddy says that people try to grab objects she has used. At the LPGA tournament in Noblesville, Ind., I grabbed a tee she had played with. It brought me my lowest round ever, a four-under-par 68, and three other subpar rounds.
LEE TALLMUD
Merrillville, Ind.

GREG & SHEP
Sir:
Those swimsuit photos in the July 10 issue of Greg Louganis (They're Pooling Their Talent) and Shep Messing (Support Your Local Keeper) prompt the question: Why not a whole issue on men's swimwear? We women deserve equal un-coverage.
MARILYN LANEY
Austin, Texas

Sir:
In 1971 Wesleyan was awarded a penalty shot against Harvard Goalkeeper Shep Messing. As the shooter lined up for the kick, Messing crossed his arms and turned his back. The ball was kicked so high over the goal that it still hasn't been found.

At the time, Shep liked to dress all in black on the field, topped off with a black leather hat. Given a mask and cape, he would have looked like Zorro.
MIKE MCKENNA
Middletown, Conn.

KNUCKLER JIM
Sir:
Jim Bouton (A Magnificent Obsession, July 3) is a man of truly generous nature with an absolute inability to be anything except the baseball-loving, non-picture-book reading nut that he is. What a marvelous lesson Bouton is for all of us who feel we are under pressure to conform to what society expects of us. Bouton recognizes that he is just going to do what he has to do—what he enjoys doing—and who among us wouldn't be better for that realization?

No matter what league Bouton plays in, whether he rides in a bus or flies, he will always be a major-leaguer to me.
LEANN ZUNICH
West Covina, Calif.

Sir:
In mentioning three kinds of ovations at sporting events, Frank Deford overlooks a fourth kind. It's the sympathetic one given a losing quarterback who gets hurt late in the fourth quarter. Jim Bouton should wake up and face the music before he hears this cheer.
STAN HARDEGREE
Fort Bragg, N.C.

OUTDOORSMEN
Sir:
I write in praise of Al Feuerbach and Mac Wilkins (Some Babes in the Woods, July 3). They dare to be themselves and the world is the richer by their example. Judging from their photographs, their life-style is not exactly injurious to health!
ROBERT FARRIS THOMPSON
North Haven, Maine

TRADE WINDS
Sir:
Some interesting trades might occur after the season is over.

For instance, if the Twins traded Dan Ford to the Expos for Gary Carter, would critics claim it was a political deal? Would the Braves be going in the right direction if they sent Jamie Easterly to the Dodgers for Bill North? A trade involving Pete Falcone of the Cards and Doug Bird of the Royals would deserve some watching. And how about a culinary swap—Woodie Fryman of the Expos for Dusty Baker of the Dodgers?

Would a three-way trade involving the Blue Jays' Jesse Jefferson, the White Sox' Claudell Washington and the Twins' Glenn Adams go down in history? If the Rangers sent Bobby Bonds and Bump Wills to the Brewers for Don Money, who would profit?

Would you believe Geronimo going to the Indians? How about Stein to the Brewers? Smalley to the Giants? Suppose Gamble were dealt to the Cards? Or Devine to the Angels?
JEFFREY G. HAFF
Cohoes, N.Y.

DAM NONSENSE
Sir:
Your June 26 SCORECARD contains two such glaring examples of the old trick of constantly repeating a lie to make it appear to be the truth that I finally have blown my stack.

Michael Bean of the Environmental Defense Fund repeats that group's everlasting contention that the Little Tennessee River is "one of the last free-flowing and clean rivers in the region," but nowhere does he explain how a river can be "free flowing" that already contains seven major dams (one is among the biggest in the Eastern U.S.—Fontana) on it and its tributaries.

He also says that Tellico Dam was planned 10 years ago. It was planned in 1939, but its construction was postponed early in WW II when labor and material were allocated to Douglas and Cherokee dams because they would provide more electricity more quickly. The power was needed for the then secret Manhattan Project at Oak Ridge, Tenn.
A. M. SMALLEY
Lenoir City, Tenn.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, New York, 10020.