19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 29, 1979

GRAND FINALE
Sir:
It has taken Bjorn Borg four consecutive Wimbledon titles to make a believer out of Curry Kirkpatrick (The Grand Finale, July 16). This time there were no comments about Borg's sausage-selling abilities or mocking insults about his accent. Instead, Kirkpatrick combined the awe Borg's peers have for him with a sense of history in the making. It is about time this champion's rare achievements were so richly described.
DIANE HYRA
Neptune, N.J.

Sir:
While rightly assessing Borg's supremacy, Kirkpatrick gave well-deserved credit to Roscoe Tanner. Borg is definitely a living legend, with only immortality to go. I think Vijay Amritraj said it best: "This man is a genius."
GREG GABRIEL
Uniontown, Pa.

Sir:
I would like to tip my hat to Kirkpatrick for his thoroughly absorbing and accurate analysis of Borg's exploits at Wimbledon. He deserves all the accolades the sports media can give him. Also, congratulations on that great photograph of Jimmy Connors. It captures the true spirit of the "gracious-losing" Jimbo better than words could ever do.
TERRENCE MARK
Olean, N.Y.

Sir:
Tanner was banner but Bjorn was borgeous!
JEFFREY KOSMACHER
Cedarhurst, N.Y.

Sir:
How can anyone say that Connors "needs anything he can get"? Let me remind you, Mr. Kirkpatrick, of the one tournament you failed to mention—the U.S. Open. Or is it that Borg, your hero, was the one who needed help in Connors' straight-set victory of a year ago? I believe you're letting your dislike of Jimbo's on-and off-court attitudes prevent you from making a fair assessment of his ability to play tennis.
SCOTT KLINE
Orlando, Fla.

Sir:
The photograph of Jimmy Connors caught him in an all-too-familiar pose. However, don't be misled into thinking that Jimbo is showing disrespect; he is merely indicating how many times he expects to beat Borg in their next 10 meetings.
JAMES ARENO
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

Sir:
I beg your pardon! Billie Jean King is an "old war mare"?

Tacky description! Ms. King is still a formidable adversary and may have a few more good decades before she's ready for the glue factory.
JANE A. BLICK
Mountain View, Calif.

EXPO EXPECTATIONS
Sir:
It is a tribute to the whole Expo organization (A Summer Winner in Montreal, July 16), that a sub-par Montreal team has been turned into a pennant contender. Montreal is one of the few teams to build a winner without spending millions of dollars. I think the Canadiens have some competition north of the border.
JOHN MOLORI
Methuen, Mass.

Sir:
Montreal fans are expecting too much. There is no way that the Expos can hold off power-packed teams like the Phillies and Pirates much longer. Their loyal fans will have to wait, because this isn't yet the season for our Canadian neighbors.
ROBERT ORESKOVIC
Sussex, Wis.

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND
Sir:
Frank Deford stated in his July 2 story on the nation's capital that "the only thing Washington ever lost was the Senators. Twice." He is only one-third right. Washington has lost a major league team six times. Granted, the information that follows comes in part from the dark ages of pre-1900 baseball.

In 1884 Washington was given a team in the major league American Association. Died after one season. In 1884 Washington was given a team in the major league Union Association. Team and league died after one season. In 1886 Washington was given a team in the National League. Died after the 1889 season. In 1891 Washington was given another team in the American Association. The team switched to the National League in 1892 and died after the 1899 season. Its first American League team moved to Minnesota after 60 years; its second to Texas after 11.
KERR JACOBSON
New York City

SHOW OF HANDS
Sir:
Congratulations on The Good Hands Man (July 16). Chiropractic is an untapped source of health service for both athletes and the general public. My personal experiences bear this out. Released in 1971 from the Red Sox minor league system with a sore elbow (Little League curveballs!), I finally regained use of my throwing arm in 1978 through the work of Dr. Donald Woodcock, a Guilford, Vt. chiropractor. He has also saved me knee operations that were advised by other physicians.

If Dwight Evans, a 1970 teammate, reads this, I hope he takes Carlton Fisk to Dr. Woodcock. Consider it my small contribution to the Red Sox pennant drive.
BILL BARRY
Greenfield, Mass.

Sir:
The fact that Dr. Perry has proved himself and that he is very much in demand by our own athletes only goes to show that those supposedly in charge of the athletes' well-being are in fact more concerned about their own pettiness. The people opposing Dr. Perry are so hung up on their vendetta against chiropractic that they are keeping valuable treatment from our athletes.
J. MAX WROTEN
Kenton, Ohio

Sir:
It is incredible how this profession continues to be ignored except by the people who get relief. Sports medicine must include chiropractic in its future.
EUGENE C. BOYLE
Ridgewood, N.J.

Sir:
We M.D.s aren't mystified by the "success" of chiropractor Perry. Any educated person realizes that we humans—athletes, M.D.s, everyone—have bodily anxieties and are prone to suggestibility. It works for anyone in the healing arts. Then what is the harm? First, if one's healing approach is 99% suggestibility and fraud like chiropractic, the harm one can do is immeasurable as compared to the "success." Secondly, this is 1979—we've come a long way from belief in witchcraft, "laying on of hands," etc. (Though after watching TV faith healers you may not think so.) I think most educated, scientific-thinking people believe that, ultimately, humans will be happier and more effective in their lives if they can tolerate unpleasant facts with as little self-delusion as possible. Of course, none of us can ever become exempt—"wishing" will still "make it so." But athletes can't get by on "psyching" forever. We all have our self-delusions. But let's try to keep them to a minimum. And never exalt them as scientific.
JOHN W. HARDEBECK, M.D., F.A.A.F.P.
San Diego

Sir:
I foresee in the near future (barring an all-out smear attack by the AMA and its affiliates) doctors of chiropractic being the most important physicians on the staff of every team—pro, college and Olympic.
FRED L. KINGSBURY, D.C.
Somerset, N.J.

Sir:
My professional colleagues and I are proud of our profession and indeed proud of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for ignoring the prejudiced AMA and printing this interesting and factual story.

Our clinic is located in the golf capital of the U.S., Pinehurst, N.C. Many golfers, amateur as well as professional, rely on our services and chiropractic to fulfill their desire to play and win.

We commend SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and Herman Weiskopf for this outstanding story. We are certain it has opened new doors for many athletes who have been misled or prejudicially influenced toward the chiropractic profession.
GARY P. DACKOR, D.C.
Southern Pines, N.C.

Sir:
Historically, athletes (and lesser humans, too) will believe anything they are convinced will benefit or provide that extra edge. The Good Hands Man clearly indicated that the most effective manipulation was between the ears of those world-class athletes.

Unfortunately, embellished testimonials allude to promised benefits that have no basis in scientific fact. Folk medicine and voodoo live on.
ROBERT E. VANNI
Assistant Professor
Health Sciences Department
Western Illinois University
Macomb, Ill.

Sir:
For as many years as SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has been published, I have witnessed my surgical colleagues struggling to rescue fallen athletes. Smashed bones have been repaired, deranged joints mended and ruptured muscles rejoined. For the most part, their efforts have been met by the ignominy of silence, perhaps deservedly so, because their results are not always that successful and their fees are sometimes a bit too high.

Dr. Leroy Perry is a miracle. This is not a master "psyching up" champion athletes who are themselves acknowledged experts in "out-psyching" their rivals. As is clearly shown in your photographs, he is making athletes taller, lengthening their strides and making old bodies into new by just knowing where' to lay on the hands. What better use can your office have than to serve as a shrine for the canonization of this great man—Saint Leroy of the Cinders!
E. B. CAMPBELL, M.D.
St. Petersburg, Fla.

Sir:
In espousing the virtues of chiropractic Mr. Weiskopf encourages young impressionable athletes and desperate coaches to turn their backs on scientifically proved modalities and replace them with gimmicks.

The only comment I can make on the technique of "acupressure" is that it prepares me for the shock of future articles on prayer cloths and voodoo.
ROBERT J. SYNOVITZ
Macomb, Ill.

TO ARMS
Sir:
After reading Up in Arms about My Arm (July 16), I am still puzzled. Why can't women accept the fact that physiologically they aren't the equivalent of men? While the female's body mass is centered around the hip region, the male's is in the chest area, thus making him more athletically adept. Perhaps Ms. Ackermann-Blount could take the issue to the ERA lobbyists—meanwhile, I'd advise enrolling in a belly-dancing class.
PHILIP C. JONES
Decatur, Ga.

Sir:
I totally agree with Joan Ackermann-Blount's conclusion that there is no difference between male and female arms. A simple test: just have those Yankee superstars throw with their opposite arm; 90% will look like Joan at her first Little League tryout.
ARNOLD LEVINE
Park Ridge, N.J.

OLD PRO
Sir:
Despite the accomplishments of Alan Page (Don't Kick Sand in His Face, July 16) outside the nation's NFL arenas, his best days inside them are behind him. One need only review the Viking record over the past decade to conclude that Bud Grant must certainly know what he is doing.
ROY HEINRICH
Madison, Wis.

Sir:
In this day of the spoiled athlete, it is refreshing to read about a true professional who is mature enough to deal with criticism and continue to produce the way Alan Page has.

If what was described in the article about Grant and his politics is true, it would seem that Page is much better off in Chicago.
KEVIN SHELDON
Glen Ridge, N.J.

Sir:
Alan Page is shown as a football player. Alan Page is shown as a lawyer. Alan Page is shown as a runner. Alan Page will always be shown as an outstanding human being.
JOHN O. ANTIGNANO
New Haven, Conn.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, New York, 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
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Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
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