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CONTENTS

Oct. 01, 1979
Oct. 01, 1979

Table of Contents
Oct. 1, 1979

Buccaneers
Shavers
Barta
College Football
Baseball
Horse Racing
Harness Racing
  • By Douglas S. Looney

    Hot Hitter, the $6 million colt, looked as if he'd rather nap than race in the Jug, but Herve Filion, the $27 million driver, aroused him for an eye-opening straight-heats win

Big Wheels
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

CONTENTS

Down to the Wire 18

This is an article from the Oct. 1, 1979 issue Original Layout

In the National League West, Houston needed a three-game sweep to catch Cincinnati, but it came up one win shy
by Ron Fimrite

In the league's Eastern Division, Montreal and Pittsburgh went up and down, back and forth in a ding-dong battle for the lead
by Larry Keith

Kicking and Clawing at Maryland 24
Paced by a walk-on who leads the nation in field goals and a back who's the NCAA's top rusher, the Terps are undefeated
by William Nack

Time for Good Times in Tampa Bay 26
Once the NFL's sorriest team—and losers of 26 games in a row—the Bucs are 4-0 after routing the Rams
by Joe Marshall

Pilgrimage to Mecca 32
It was a long trek, but heavyweight Earnie Shavers made it to his dream house. Will Larry Holmes help pay for it?
by William Nack

Oh, the Joys of Losing Fish 36
Tred Barta lost 110 yellowfin before landing a record fish on six-pound test, but he's still hooked on light tackle
by Dan Levin

"Let Those Big Wheels Sing to Me" 66
Tyrone Malone listened to the melody, and now, with some help from a whale, he has truck racing revving up for the big time
by Frank Deford

The Departments

Scorecard 15
College Football 43
Baseball 50
TV/Radio 56
Horse Racing 59
Harness Racing 62
For the Record 91
19th Hole 92

Credits on page 91

Cover photograph by Walter Iooss Jr.

Next Week

Hockey's lost decade is Ken Dryden's view of the 70s. The retired Montreal goaltender, now a full-time law student, assesses the NHL's shortcomings and discusses life as a Canadien. And as E. M. Swift sees it, Les Canadiens' reign is finis.

Not an everyday tour, but every day the entrants in the Great Hawaiian Footrace ran until the 500 kilometers—nearly three times around Oahu—were done. Kenny Moore tells of life on and off the road, of tropical serenity and street gangs.