BOATING—MOXIE, a 51-foot trimaran, skippered by Philip Weld, 65, of Gloucester, Mass., won the singlehanded transatlantic race from Plymouth, England to Newport, R.I. He finished the 3,387 miles in a record 17 days, 23 hours and 12 minutes (page 24).

BOXING—ALAN MINTER successfully defended his world middleweight crown with an eighth-round TKO of Vito Antuofermo in Wembley, England (page 18).

GOLF—ROBERTO de VICENZO shot a one-over-par 285 to win the $100,000 U.S. Senior Open in Mamaroneck, N.Y. He beat amateur Bill Campbell by four strokes (page 42).

Nancy Lopez-Melton shot a nine-under-par 283 to win a $125,000 LPGA tournament by one stroke over Pat Bradley in Rochester, N.Y.

Lee Trevino, who finished with a 16-under-par 272, defeated Tom Purtzer by a stroke to win the $300,000 Memphis Classic.

HARNESS RACING—NIATROSS ($2.20), Clint Galbraith in the sulky, extended his unbeaten string to 19 races by winning the $321,365 Cane Pace, the first leg of pacing's triple crown, at Yonkers Raceway. In the final heat, the 3-year-old colt covered the mile in 1:57[4/5] to outpace Trenton Time by 1¼ lengths.

HORSE RACING—BOLD 'N DETERMINED ($4.40), Eddie Delahoussaye up, won the $140,000 Coaching Club American Oaks at Belmont by a head over Erin's Word. The 3-year-old triumphed in the third leg of the filly Triple Crown in 2:31[4/5] for the 1½ miles.

Tyrnavos, Anthony Murray up, beat Prince Bee by a length and a half to win the $380,000 Irish Sweeps Derby in The Curragh, near Dublin. The 3-year-old colt ran the 1½ miles in 2:43.8.

Driving Home, ridden by Bill Parsons, beat Someolio Man by 1½ lengths to win the $183,930 Queen's Plate Stakes at Woodbine in Etobicoke, Ontario. The 3-year-old gelding finished the 1¼ miles in 2:04[1/5].

MOTOR SPORTS—ALAN JONES of Australia averaged 126.073 miles per hour in a Williams-Ford to win the 66th French Grand Prix by 4.5 seconds over Frenchman Didier Pironi, driving a Ligier-Ford, over the 3.6-mile Paul Ricard circuit near Marseille.

SOCCER—NASL: In a week marked by eight overtime games, including five shootouts, and numerous high-scoring performances, Seattle won its 10th straight home game, beating Minnesota 3-2 in overtime on a Frank Barton goal at 92:33. Sounder Forward Roger Davies scored his second hat trick of the season in a 3-0 victory over Atlanta to increase his league-scoring lead to seven points over Giorgio Chinaglia. Chinaglia wasn't the only member of the National Conference East-leading Cosmos who couldn't score. The whole team was shut out 2-0 by Los Angeles; it was the first time in 56 games, since July 5, 1978, that the Cosmos were held scoreless. San Diego couldn't score either, as it continued an 0-4 road trip by losing 2-0 to Tampa Bay (11-8), whose Steve Wegerle assisted on both goals to give him a league career record of 51, surpassing the mark of former Rowdy Rodney Marsh. And after an NASL record 11 shootout rounds, San Diego then lost at Detroit 1-0 for the Express' first shootout win in four tries. Dallas got two shootout victories. In Portland the Tornado snapped its seven-game losing streak by hitting on all five shootout attempts for a 1-0 win over the Timbers (5-12). Then Al Miller, the only remaining American-born coach after Atlanta's Dan Wood was fired this week, got his 100th career win as Dallas beat Tampa Bay 1-0, again in a shootout. In Wood's last game, his Chiefs lost 5-1 to Tulsa, which was sparked by a pair of goals by Billy Caskey. New England's Bob Newton and Los Angeles' Luis Fernando each scored a hat trick—Fernando as the Aztecs beat Edmonton 6-2 and Newton, who set a team record for the quickest three-goal binge (26:52), as the Tea Men defeated Philadelphia 4-0. Earlier in the week Edmonton beat Fort Lauderdale 3-2 on two Edi Kirschner goals, and New England Goalie Kevin Keelan shut out Rochester 2-0. ASC Central leader Chicago (15-3) won twice, shutting out Memphis 2-0 and three days later edging Minnesota 2-1 in overtime. Arno Steffenhagen scored the winner at 102:02. Washington's $1.5 million man, Johan Cruyff, who signed his monster contract before this season, scored only his second goal for the Dips as they beat Vancouver 2-0. Yet Sunday he exploded for two goals and three assists as the Dips beat Houston 6-3. ASC West leader California (10-10) is getting consistently more out of Laurie Abrahams, who had four goals and an assist as the Surf beat Houston 5-4 in overtime.

ASL: Tom Reynolds, goalie of American Conference leader Sacramento, got the league's only shutout of the week and his fifth of the season as the Gold beat last-place Golden Gate 1-0. Otherwise, the scoring was prolific. Pennsylvania opened the week by trouncing California 4-1 on two goals and two assists by Adrian Brooks. Three days later the Stoners found themselves on the short end of the same score as New York won before only 1,721 fans at Shea Stadium. National Conference leader Columbus split a pair of games with Miami, losing 3-2 on two goals by Miami Forward Charley Greene and then beating the Americans on Sunday 2-1. Cleveland beat California 2-1, with Walter Schlothauer getting both Cobra goals.

TRACK & FIELD—Two American records were set in the concluding week of the Olympic Trials in Eugene, Ore. HENRY MARSH of Eugene won the 3,000-meter steeplechase in eight minutes, 15.7 seconds, breaking by 3.6 seconds the mark set in 1978 by Doug Brown. JODI ANDERSON of Los Angeles surpassed her own 1978 record in the long jump with a leap of 22'11¾", four inches farther than her previous best. Other winners were: women's 100 meters—ALICE BROWN of Anaheim, Calif. (11.32); 110 hurdles—RENALDO NEHEMIAH of Scotch Plains, N.J. (13.26); women's 100 hurdles—STEPHANIE HIGHTOWER of Columbus, Ohio (12.90); men's 200—JAMES BUTLER of Stillwater, Okla. (20.49); women's 200—CHANDRA CHEESEBOROUGH of Jacksonville, Fla. (22.70); men's 400—BILL GREEN of Palo Alto, Calif. (45.85); women's 400—SHERRI HOWARD of Granada Hills, Calif. (51.48); men's 400 hurdles—EDWIN MOSES of Mission Viejo, Calif. (47.90); men's 800—DON PAIGE of Marcy, N.Y. (1:44.53); women's 800—MADELINE MANNING of Tulsa (1:58.30); men's 1,500—STEVE SCOTT of Tempe, Ariz. (3:35.15); women's 1,500—MARY DECKER of Eugene, Ore. (4:04.91); and the 10,000—CRAIG VIRGIN of Lebanon, Ill.(27:45.61). Winners in the men's field events were: discus—MAC WILKINS of Soquei, Calif. (225'4"); shotput—PETER SHMOCK of Cupertino, Calif. (68'4¼"); pole vault—TOM HINTNAUS of San Jose, Calif. (18'4½"); high jump—BENN FIELDS of Salisbury Mills, N.Y. (7'5"); long jump—LARRY MYRICKS of Tallahassee (27'2"); hammer throw—ANDY BESSETTE of Vernon, Conn. (232'10"); and javelin—ROD EWALIKO of Seattle (291').Women's field winners were: high jump—LOUISE RITTER of Denton, Tex. (6'1¼"); javelin—KARIN SMITH OF Los Angeles (208'5"); and discus—LORNA GRIFFIN of San Diego (197'6"). BOB COFFMAN of Houston won the decathlon with 8,184 points (page 12).

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)